Diesel Lag

Diesel Lag

This is a discussion on Diesel Lag within the FCA/EPA 3.0L Diesel Settlement and AEM (Approved Emissions Modification) forums, part of the FCA/EPA 3.0L Diesel Settlement and AEM category; I had my truck at the dealer today to confirm the lag when accelerating when the engine is cold. They checked and confirmed my complaint. ...

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    RAM Rookie troubleshooter's Avatar
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    Diesel Lag

    I had my truck at the dealer today to confirm the lag when accelerating when the engine is cold. They checked and confirmed my complaint. Technician contacted star(Chrysler Engineering Department) The technician was told that this is a normal condition when vehicle is cold. Technician was told that power is cut from the engine until the engine coolant temperature reaches 150 degrees. This is to stop Rod Bearing from being damaged. Technician found all ok at this time. Vehicle is operating as designed after recall. Recheck ok. I was told by the technician to let the truck warm up for 10 minutes before driving it. Amazing

    Dave

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    Administrator 97hmcs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by troubleshooter View Post
    I had my truck at the dealer today to confirm the lag when accelerating when the engine is cold. They checked and confirmed my complaint. Technician contacted star(Chrysler Engineering Department) The technician was told that this is a normal condition when vehicle is cold. Technician was told that power is cut from the engine until the engine coolant temperature reaches 150 degrees. This is to stop Rod Bearing from being damaged. Technician found all ok at this time. Vehicle is operating as designed after recall. Recheck ok. I was told by the technician to let the truck warm up for 10 minutes before driving it. Amazing

    Dave
    Yep. Good advice from the tech.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Diesel Lag-2.jpeg  

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    RAM Jr Member vettelover's Avatar
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    So what you are saying is that your vehicle is experience a change in performance after the AEM, which was not supposed to affect performance at all.

    Diesel Lag-vehicle-performance.jpg

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    RAM Jr Member vettelover's Avatar
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    But hey who really cares if you can't merge into traffic now because your bearings are FINALLY being protected like they should have been from the FCA factory to start with.

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    MAS
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    Curious what it is with the ecodiesel specifically that makes the bearings so vulnerable till warmed up?

    I almost never let the truck run for more than 20 seconds before driving unless it’s really cold and not plugged in. The UOA I had done was from my winter oil and showed very low wear metals. I Am easy on the gas till it’s warmed up but I get on a 70 mph road within a mile. Just don’t pull out in front of people.
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    RAM Professional phprof's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAS View Post
    Curious what it is with the ecodiesel specifically that makes the bearings so vulnerable till warmed up?

    I almost never let the truck run for more than 20 seconds before driving unless it’s really cold and not plugged in. The UOA I had done was from my winter oil and showed very low wear metals. I Am easy on the gas till it’s warmed up but I get on a 70 mph road within a mile. Just don’t pull out in front of people.
    There are some areas in this country where people can't get onto their road on the way to work without pulling out and putting the pedal to the metal. They live where I would never live. Poorly designed roads, traffic controls, and a local/state government that is too fat to care. Or they don't have enough patience. Or both.

    Regardless, I'm bothered by FCA claiming this is to protect the main bearings. Is this some kind of ruse? What is this engine made with ... tinker toys?

    The reality is its a design failure if this is true.
    Last edited by phprof; 08-15-2019 at 02:43 PM.
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    RAM Ninja shaggn85's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAS View Post
    Curious what it is with the ecodiesel specifically that makes the bearings so vulnerable till warmed up?

    I almost never let the truck run for more than 20 seconds before driving unless it’s really cold and not plugged in. The UOA I had done was from my winter oil and showed very low wear metals. I Am easy on the gas till it’s warmed up but I get on a 70 mph road within a mile. Just don’t pull out in front of people.
    There are a lot of theories about the bearings. One recently brought up someone here mentioned the possibility of a driveline induced harmonic oscillation that shreds the bearings. I think this is plausible given that many of these are not showing any signs of trouble before they nuke.

    Can also be assembly issues..

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    RAM Sr Member Kyler's Avatar
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    I had a problem with the particulant sensors. Took it to the dealership and also complained about the lag. The head mechanic checked it and had them replace the catalytic converter as well as the sensors. Have been drinking it s week and just hauled a load of logs (which normally sucks due to the lag). Truck ran fine. No lag. Just as preppy as new.

    I hope that was the fix.
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    RAM Diamond Member Captainmal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kyler View Post
    I had a problem with the particulant sensors. Took it to the dealership and also complained about the lag. The head mechanic checked it and had them replace the catalytic converter as well as the sensors. Have been drinking it s week and just hauled a load of logs (which normally sucks due to the lag). Truck ran fine. No lag. Just as preppy as new.

    I hope that was the fix.
    That answered the question I had on your other thread. DPF was the issue.

    All diesels are slow when cold. My old 6.5, the Duramax and even my Cummins suffered when cold. I learned that even idling for a while does not heat them up enough. Then there is also a cold transmission issue if you have an automatic, as all the Ecodiesels are. Always afraid to push the engine much until it is warm. I watch my oil pressure also. When it drops below 50 it seems the coolant temperature is finally above 150*. Then I will try to accelerate to highway speeds. Before that - let the traffic pass. Once warm I just pass them back.

    Never push a diesel hard when it is cold. If FCA sets up the AEM to do that they are just accelerating the learning curve for slow learners and maybe saving engines. Think they should also be publishing that to educate the owners and help them learn to adapt to road situations when cold.
    If you wrestle with a pig you'll both get dirty and the pig loves it. .

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    RAM Regular GRIFF4's Avatar
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    My question about the FCA claiming they are purposefully derating the engine until oil temps reach 150 to protect from bearing failure. Then wouldn't that mean the GDE tuned trucks have a higher failure rate because they remove that lag out of the tune. If so why do you not hear people with the gde tuned trucks failing when it's the opposite of that. Is there something else at play with the gde tune helping from failure then ?

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