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I just had one of our salesmens 1500 eco diesel burn down while I was on the phone with him. From the time he called to report a CEL to complete destruction 3.27 minutes while coasting to a stop on the I17

FCA knows the EGR coolers leak and on Oct 19th, 2019 issued a voluntary recall VB1 to replace the coolers because in "rare" circumstances engines have cougth fire. As of today, they do not have parts a available to perform this recall, but the Tony's are trying.

If your truck is losing small amounts of coolant with no sign of a leak, carry a fire extinguisher. If you see white smoke out the tail pipe, prepare to nail out.

Good luck all
 

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I just had one of our salesmens 1500 eco diesel burn down while I was on the phone with him. From the time he called to report a CEL to complete destruction 3.27 minutes while coasting to a stop on the I17

FCA knows the EGR coolers leak and on Oct 19th, 2019 issued a voluntary recall VB1 to replace the coolers because in "rare" circumstances engines have cougth fire. As of today, they do not have parts a available to perform this recall, but the Tony's are trying.

If your truck is losing small amounts of coolant with no sign of a leak, carry a fire extinguisher. If you see white smoke out the tail pipe, prepare to nail out.

Good luck all
Theres been plenty of them. Theres a facebook group specifically for fires. No one is gonna try to put their truck out if it burns. I called my insurance company, they would pay it and go after FCA for the money. Info about the recall and the fact they catch on fire is old news. The 2019 and 2020 2500 and 3500 with the cummins and auto trans is now on the recall fire list due to trans fluid dipstick popping out with the chance of fluid landing on the turbo. Promasters also are recalled for fire.

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Its still ironic that fca has not disclosed the real reason for the engine fires. Egr coolers have been cracking and leaking for a very long time coolant doesn't burn. But when the stupid egr bypass valve malfunctions and pumps 800 F plus exhaust into the intake that can start a fire.
 

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We never heard of an ecodiesel fire until after the AEM recall started in May 2019. Maybe there was one here or there, but the instances since the recall have increased significantly. We maintain the fires are due to very poor engine calibration and not the egr cooler.
 

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Its still ironic that fca has not disclosed the real reason for the engine fires. Egr coolers have been cracking and leaking for a very long time coolant doesn't burn. But when the stupid egr bypass valve malfunctions and pumps 800 F plus exhaust into the intake that can start a fire.
I thought that too. Google it, coolant will burn.

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I just had one of our salesmens 1500 eco diesel burn down while I was on the phone with him. From the time he called to report a CEL to complete destruction 3.27 minutes while coasting to a stop on the I17

FCA knows the EGR coolers leak and on Oct 19th, 2019 issued a voluntary recall VB1 to replace the coolers because in "rare" circumstances engines have cougth fire. As of today, they do not have parts a available to perform this recall, but the Tony's are trying.

If your truck is losing small amounts of coolant with no sign of a leak, carry a fire extinguisher. If you see white smoke out the tail pipe, prepare to nail out.

Good luck all
Welcome to the forum - First post.

Yeah. Unfortunately this report just adds to the body of information available on the topic. Thanks for the alert.

That GDE comment bears some thought. I thought surely there were fire reports before the AEM. I mean the AEM just started in maybe May of 2019. Just doesn't seem to me that the frequent fire reports only started after that. There are many on here who can confirm or deny the timetable.
 

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Its still ironic that fca has not disclosed the real reason for the engine fires. Egr coolers have been cracking and leaking for a very long time coolant doesn't burn. But when the stupid egr bypass valve malfunctions and pumps 800 F plus exhaust into the intake that can start a fire.
Might find this interesting.
 

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Here's what FCA had to say - see attachments.
Knowing coolant is flammable and the failing cooler sets up the potential fire I have to agree with FCA.
 

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I am not sure that you are going to see white smoke at all prior to the fire. Yes, that is a normal thing for people to say about coolant leaks that pass through the engine and exhaust...

In my case, I did not detect any white smoke prior to complete shutdown. It was ~8:40pm on Friday, January 03, 2020... hard to see white smoke at night. My 2015 Limited threw a familiar CEL/MIL on the dash about 6 minutes before it gave me a "Service Electronic Throttle Control" message on the EVIC. Vehicle immediately shut down and I coasted to a stop on the side of a rural two-lane road, still not even considering it could be on fire. It did not overheat (coolant/trans/oil/intake) as I was monitoring all of those temps. Immediately upon stopping, I smelled and saw smoke in the cabin. I pulled the hood release and opened the door almost simultaneously -- before even putting it in Park. Back from my private pilot training... you want to make sure you can get out of a 'hard landing,' so you pop the door open just before touching down. I was alone, thank God. Had it been 36 hours later, my entire family would have been inside with a loaded up truck for a 6 hour round trip on Sunday.

The reason I say all that is because mine had full-on flames under the hood, close to the firewall, passenger side of the engine compartment -- in less than 90 seconds from stopping the truck. At that time, I stopped all efforts to remove property from the cabin (I was able to get everything out of the bed of the truck and toss it 30' behind the vehicle). Then I pulled out my phone and started filming as I huffed and puffed and got away from the vehicle.

This photo is about 120 seconds after I started filming... because my wife call me 90 seconds after filming started -- to find out if the vehicle fire reported over the fire department's radio was me!
85225


Even though I thought I was prepared for this eventuality, you cannot be fully ready to be exposed to this and witness just how fast and violent this fire grows. Do not try to fight this fire. My fire department's incident report estimated 350 gallons of water were used to put out this fire. It took less than 15 minutes for them to put it out.. and their response was within 10 minutes of the 911 call. Those stats are extremely impressive if you ask me.

Unless this is the white smoke you are referring to being warned about?
B1E005A8-F4C6-478F-B6E3-8C09651F09C6_1_105_c.jpeg

Well, by this point, it is way too late.

I am thankful for this forum and others with those who had reported their experience of 'about two minutes' is all you get to get out of the vehicle. For me it was less than that. If you had 2 or 3 children (in car seats?!) or anybody who could not easily get out of the vehicle on their own at a moment's notice, it would be life-threatening for sure. If somebody cannot get out of the vehicle, it will not be survivable. In the picture of the interior, you can imagine my daughter's booster seat, which I had moved to the center seat with my snowmobile helmet sitting on the booster. I was not able to everything out of the back seat.... my snowmobile suit and my hockey coach's jacket were on the floor of the back seat. You can see the stuffing from my snowmobile jacket at the bottom of the photo along with an orange/black piece of plastic sticking up. I had gone to Harbor Freight to buy that inspection camera. HF did not have pity on me at all, I had to repurchase the camera at full price, and they tell you that their extended warranty covers 'everything.' Ha! Well, not everything.

EA4FBE89-9403-48C5-85E8-B75E817DFDEC_1_105_c.jpeg


Since I am still waiting to hear from FCA about the possibility of action on my truck, I have decided not to release my video publicly yet. Two fire inspectors have had the opportunity to view it, and I believe that is why FCA called me back finally.

I urge everybody driving an EcoDiesel prior to 2020 to seriously consider their situation. Get the vehicle in for inspection immediately if there is any sign of coolant being used (meaning, is it below the full mark when cold... or is it below the seam at all? Then get it in NOW. Document it. Mine is documented from 12/12/2019. I topped off the overflow the morning prior to this fire happening.. as I was preparing for our road trip on Sunday. Luckily, I did not fill it up with fuel before trying to return home from town the night it burned. What a waste.
85226

This is at the seam... too low. Fill to the cold mark when cold.

85227
 

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I've had occasional white smoke, but it finally crashed last week. I drove the truck home (only semi-hoping for a fire) and parked it. It sounds like a real fix may be a while out so I went and bought another car in the meantime. Now I'm trying to decide between waiting and having FCA fix everything EGR related, then deleting it, or just deleting it and severing ties. I'm not quite ready to cough up $1k to tune, but could do the delete at home in an afternoon and deal with codes in an emergency. The dealer is urging me to just delete and call it good, but who knows what their real interests are at this point.

Honestly I think it's pretty crappy of FCA to string us along like this over a purchase between $30k and $70k. I love the truck, but could do without the James Bond style smoke screen and flame effects.
 

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Just an fyi for all thise saying coolant is flammable that is correct but it needs oxygen to combust and the exhaust gasses in the egr have very little to no available oxygen which is how the egr works. The oxygen is not introduced until the intake which by then temps are well below whats needed to ignite coolant. The only reasonable explanation is the egr bypass valve malfunctions and the poor calibration does not catch it because there is a temp sensor in the egr after all.
 

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The dealer is urging me to just delete and call it good, but who knows what their real interests are at this point.
A Ram dealer said that? Interesting.

Your bio says you drive a 2015, is it still under warranty?
 

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Just an fyi for all thise saying coolant is flammable that is correct but it needs oxygen to combust and the exhaust gasses in the egr have very little to no available oxygen which is how the egr works. The oxygen is not introduced until the intake which by then temps are well below whats needed to ignite coolant. The only reasonable explanation is the egr bypass valve malfunctions and the poor calibration does not catch it because there is a temp sensor in the egr after all.
Not trying to start something, nor hijack this thread, but I think this is worth discussing and perhaps some knowledgable people can chime in.
First, this is speculation, I am not a mechanic and I am basing my reasoning on only what I have read.
FCA claims that coolant is being leaked into the intake system via the egr. It mixes with the hot egr gases and the oxygen inside the intake manifold and can, under the right conditions, result in an auto- ignition of the coolant.
It would be interesting to see if most of these fires occurred at highway speeds when exhaust gases could possibly be hot enough to cause auto-igniton? Or perhaps it could happen during a regen when temps spike?
I pose these questions because I don't know the answers.
Second, I would think if the egr failed in the open position then the intake would be flooded with exhaust gases depriving the engine of fresh oxygen. The result would cause rough idling and problems with acceleration.
These are just thoughts for discussion and I want to thank everyone here for their knowledge in helping me to understand more fully the truck I drive.
 

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Not trying to start something, nor hijack this thread, but I think this is worth discussing and perhaps some knowledgable people can chime in.
First, this is speculation, I am not a mechanic and I am basing my reasoning on only what I have read.
FCA claims that coolant is being leaked into the intake system via the egr. It mixes with the hot egr gases and the oxygen inside the intake manifold and can, under the right conditions, result in an auto- ignition of the coolant.
It would be interesting to see if most of these fires occurred at highway speeds when exhaust gases could possibly be hot enough to cause auto-igniton? Or perhaps it could happen during a regen when temps spike?
I pose these questions because I don't know the answers.
Second, I would think if the egr failed in the open position then the intake would be flooded with exhaust gases depriving the engine of fresh oxygen. The result would cause rough idling and problems with acceleration.
These are just thoughts for discussion and I want to thank everyone here for their knowledge in helping me to understand more fully the truck I drive.
The majority of fire pics I've seen are highway with trailers in tow. Not all but most. The rest are on open roads/highway just the truck.

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Not trying to start something, nor hijack this thread, but I think this is worth discussing and perhaps some knowledgable people can chime in.
First, this is speculation, I am not a mechanic and I am basing my reasoning on only what I have read.
FCA claims that coolant is being leaked into the intake system via the egr. It mixes with the hot egr gases and the oxygen inside the intake manifold and can, under the right conditions, result in an auto- ignition of the coolant.
It would be interesting to see if most of these fires occurred at highway speeds when exhaust gases could possibly be hot enough to cause auto-igniton? Or perhaps it could happen during a regen when temps spike?
I pose these questions because I don't know the answers.
Second, I would think if the egr failed in the open position then the intake would be flooded with exhaust gases depriving the engine of fresh oxygen. The result would cause rough idling and problems with acceleration.
These are just thoughts for discussion and I want to thank everyone here for their knowledge in helping me to understand more fully the truck I drive.
Just a fyi the egr should be closed and not flowing during regen other wise it would be putting fuel into the intake. Intake manifold temps should never exceed 300 F which is well below auto ignition temps for coolant. Egr flow is normally no more than 30% of total air so the other 70% comes from the intercooler and should be within 30ish degrees of ambient temp. All this is generalized and not specific to this engine of course .
 

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Theres been plenty of them. Theres a facebook group specifically for fires. No one is gonna try to put their truck out if it burns. I called my insurance company, they would pay it and go after FCA for the money. Info about the recall and the fact they catch on fire is old news. The 2019 and 2020 2500 and 3500 with the cummins and auto trans is now on the recall fire list due to trans fluid dipstick popping out with the chance of fluid landing on the turbo. Promasters also are recalled for fire.

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The 2007-2011 Wranglers has the same problem catching fire due to burping trans fluid from the dipstick on the exhaust manifold. Their solution, a ‘hot oil’ warning on the instrument cluster.


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The 2007-2011 Wranglers has the same problem catching fire due to burping trans fluid from the dipstick on the exhaust manifold. Their solution, a ‘hot oil’ warning on the instrument cluster.


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FCA should just give up. They only out sell gm due to their pricing. Cant compete any other way.

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