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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I am driving down to CA to pickup a 25' travel trailer with ATV's/UTV in it. Total weight is about 7600 which is at my trucks mfg limit.
I did buy air lift 1000 spring bags so should I install them or go with a WDH setup instead? Which unit would fit my situation?
I have 40k left on my AEM warranty. Truck is at 117k and I have not had any issues to date.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks good video. I am going to go with the Husky center line TS 32218
 

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I'd do both. Air assist or air bags don't replace a good WDH. Some states require them if towing over a certain length/weight, so I'd look into that. Insurance also wont' cover a wreck without a WDH in some cases. I have timbergrove airbags and still use a WDH every time.
 

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Yep, run both. You can run just the WDH if you like, you'll get just a little sag when the WDH is set up properly.

I tow the same weight in my 30' toy hauler. Keep your oil temp gauge on the dash and keep an eye on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I believe you want the oil temperature to stay under 240F when towing? Not sure on the transmission temp
 

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Run both!! I cannot comment on towing with the ecoD but I an vouch for the 1500 chassis. Bags, 3.92 gears and E rated tires and I crushed much greater weight with my gasser.

The real limit is your cooling system and how fast you want to tow.
 

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Toddod, Best explanation I know for how the WDH works is the wheel barrow. Front WB tire represents your steer axle. WB legs represents the trucks drive axle. Load the WB with dirt or imaginary trailer hitch, most of the weight is on the WB legs. Your arms lifting the WB handles represents the WDH/spring bars. As you lift the handles weight gets transferred from the WB legs to both the WB front tires and your legs which represents the trailer tires. Get it? :)

The Husky Centerline is quality and gets good reviews. The in coil bags you already have will work fine. Meh the video is good for those thinking about one or the other WDH vs bags. Most with 4th gen Ram 1500s are thinking about both WDH plus bags which is what I would do if I were you towing a 7,800 pound box Toy Hauler with an ED.

Assuming it’s not windy and you are not driving fast on rough roads the difference between the potential of that load being “white knuckle” or two fingers drivable is in the set up. CAT scales have a free app you can download that gives turn by turn gps directions to the nearest or on path CAT scales & details. Cost is usually about $12 & $2 per additional weigh. Cheap for safety, insurance of and a low stress towing experience. It weighs steer drive & trailer axles separately & at the same time to see what the eye cannot.

In coil bags you are supposed to air up before loading. That does not completely work with how I want to set up my tow but we can work with it. I’d air them to 15 psi, get the front & rear truck bumper heights, then set the trailer on the ball and latch it, run the trailer jack up until the back bumper is 2” taller than before, set the spring bars, usually a little stiffer than as hitch Mfgrs recommends, lower jack. This should get your trailer about level if you have selected the right height adjustment on your hitch - you can tape measure trailer frame to ground front and back of trailer to know how close to level you have it. The front truck bumper height should not have changed a lot if it has that means you will noticeably benefit from CAT scale adjustments. You may add another 15 psi to the bags at this point to get a slight rake in truck stance with the trailer being about level. This should be in the ballpark and safe to tow to the scales.

Scale it pull off and get your scale slip. Ideally you have weighed just you and your truck prior to getting the trailer. If you are not carrying anything excessive in the cab n bed your steer axle should be around 3,240 & drive around 2,500. I’ll use those numbers for example purposes. You would compare this to your scale slip with trailer attached.

You can see how much the trailer tongue weight added to your truck weight. Add this to the trailer axle weight numbers and you have the gross trailer weight.

I adjust my WDH, trailer & truck loading toward A replacing my unloaded steer weight. B 12 percent tongue weight of gross trailer weight. Usually by the time I get these close all the other numbers such as drive axle weight has fallen in line.

So if you’re trailers gross weight is 7,800 you adjust toward a seen in your drive & steer weight combination an actual WDH tongue weight of 940 pounds IE 12 percent of gross trailer weight.

Distributed as 3,240 steer (unloaded steer weight replaced by WDH) and a drive axle weight of 3,440. (For truck weight with 940 TW) Naturally trailer axles would show about 6,960 IE 7,800 less the 940 transferred to the truck. Maximum stability safe & stable. Often two fingers drive-able. All truck specs can be checked against your weight slip. Great if you were in an accident you can prove you were responsible and in compliance.

Now I know somebody is thinking but wait we have not talked about the payload sticker or stacked up weight guesstimates. That’s right because it’s largely irrelevant information with respects to setting up a safe stable within the limits tow. BTW if you added the 3,240 & 3,440 axle weights you will find that the trucks GVW is 6,680 IE below the 6,950 GVWR rating. Now you are in the know and can tow like a pro. Instead of being lead by blind parrots that infest TT forums.

FWIW Generally gearing & trailer tires are set up to tow to 65 mph not more. Keep it below that she will run cooler and use measurably less fuel. Computer will start to derate and pull fuel at 266 oil or 245 water. Generally if you let it shift itself and just keep sustained rpms to 3k or less no derate. Easy to manage but like Bounty I like to watch my temps when I tow.

Ok for fun I have one more wheel barrow example. Suppose the front wheel on the WB was really tall to where the front WB axle was above your hands on the handles. How stable would that WB steer? How long before you wore out from carrying most of the weight? It’s the same with your truck steering stability and rear suspension. Next what if you had a tiny front tire and all the weight is on it? There is no weight on your hands & feet its lifting you up some and all the weight is on that tiny front axle so if the WB starts to tip around a corner or wiggles from grooves in the pavement you have no weight or traction to stop it or control the wiggle or sway as it would be with a truck & trailer. Capeesh? At speed it could be occilating sway and take WB and control away from you.
 

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@VernDiesel Thank you for the wisdom, as always. Have you broke the 700k barrier yet?
 

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YW guys. 654
 

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Discussion Starter #14

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YW. If you have questions now or if & when you go to follow this to set up your Truck & Trailer just ask. The idea is here is the formula the process and the two primary goals. You just plug your numbers in then make adjustments to your hitch or loading and re weight until you get where you are satisfied & reasonably close to your goal weight distribution. She will be stable & safe as can be.

If you weigh your truck $12 same day as you pick up the trailer & return to weigh it you attach those slips to your first slip so that they are only $2 a piece. Theoretically you could do it with 3 weight slips in reality it will probably be 4 or 5. Even at 5 slips this example cost you $20 and an hour or so to have a safe stable tow home. If next time you load the toy hauler etc the same you should not need to return to scales.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
So my trailer is a Royal Cargo 25' (5' v-nose) combination car hauler/snowmobile that I bought last fall. My buddy took it to Glamis with his 3500 chevy and it has been in storage for 4 months. I only pulled it empty after I purchased it (pulled fine). It is 4200# empty, has 5200k torsion axles and rated at 9999lbs. The problem is I do not believe there is room to mount the Husky WDH hitch I want as it needs 28" minimum. With the v-nose there is not much open frame space.I cannot measure until I look at it on March 16th. I do know the trailer has tabs mounted on the frame but the original owner said it did not come with any type of WDH hitch.
Could be an interesting 2000 mile drive back to Wisconsin!
 

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If its empty on the way back to Wisconsin it should tow fine. I can sure see how that design could limit weight distribution options though.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Not empty. I am driving from WI to CA without a trailer and taking the one mentioned above back with me. 4 ATV's standing up in the front of the trailer and a CanAm X3 in the back (backed in for weight above axles as the motor is in the rear of the UTV). I estimate about 7800# (4200 trailer 3600 items)
 

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I have the Airlift 1000 in my truck and I’ve pulled 9000lb+ for at least 5000 miles now with just the hitch pull no problem. The key is correctly balancing the trailer, and I have a Weighsafe hitch ball to measure the tongue weight. I have never had any issues from the south of Arizona to the cold of the Pacific Northwest.

For me, a WDH is a lot more work for not that much benefit on a trailer that frankly isn’t that heavy. Plus the first time you forget to disconnect them and make a tight turn or try and back up and you’ll be bending those bars. The trailer dealer told me themselves: There are only two people who need weight distributing hitches. People who tow massive trailers, and people who drive like assholes.

Having put thousands of miles on it, I’m inclined to agree.
 

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I have the Airlift 1000 in my truck and I’ve pulled 9000lb+ for at least 5000 miles now with just the hitch pull no problem. The key is correctly balancing the trailer, and I have a Weighsafe hitch ball to measure the tongue weight. I have never had any issues from the south of Arizona to the cold of the Pacific Northwest.

For me, a WDH is a lot more work for not that much benefit on a trailer that frankly isn’t that heavy. Plus the first time you forget to disconnect them and make a tight turn or try and back up and you’ll be bending those bars. The trailer dealer told me themselves: There are only two people who need weight distributing hitches. People who tow massive trailers, and people who drive like assholes.

Having put thousands of miles on it, I’m inclined to agree.
Is that trailer dealer name George Parker and does he have a bridge in Brooklyn to sell you too? So are the rest of us assholes, because +9000lbs behind 1500 is a massive trailer.
The laws of physics apply to everyone, even at 8% tongue weight that's still over 700 lbs on the tongue. That will shed a few hundred pounds off the front axle, even more so using airbags (If you don't know what I'm talking about, watch the video referenced).
Just because the truck and trailer is level, doesn't mean it correct.
I've yet to bend a set of WDH bars. I'll turn a trailer hard coming within inches of the truck's bumper in either direction.
 
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