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I own a 2015 4x4 Outdoorsman. Love the truck and my good old GDE tune. I've got 50k mile on it. Driving during the Colorado winters and a little off-roading, I have grown to love my Borg-Warner 44-45 transfer case. This is the version that is actually a real 4WD transfer case. My dash selector has three options - not four: 2WD, 4WD, and 4WD low - no 4WD auto.

With the 44-45 when you are in 4WD you really supply power to all 4 wheels and if you drive it on dry pavement in this mode you will get wheel hop if you turn it sharply, since all 4 wheels are locked together. The truck performs great in snow, ice, mud etc... better than the 44-44 version which has a clutch and is more similar to an AWD car.

My neighbor has been looking at the Gen 3 2020s and I have been helping her with some advice. I can't find any info on the RAM site about any option mentioning transfer case style. Do any of you know about the 2020s or own one that only has the three options vs. the four, indicating a 44-45 transfer case?
 

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I don't see that they advertise it anymore like they did with the gen 4 trucks. But if you use the build and price tool on the website and look at the interior picture, the tradesman clearly shows 2wd, 4wd hi, 4wd low. And the laramie clearly shows 2wd, 4wd auto, 4wd hi, 4wd low, so they are still using both the 44-45 and 44-44. IIRC with the gen 4 trucks the 44-45 was only available in tradesman, express, slt and outdoorsman, 44-44 was used in everything else. My bighorn has the 44-44.

My guess is gen 5 will be similar with 44-45 only available in tradesman and rebel, and 44-44 in everything else. It also doesn't appear that selecting the off-road group has an affect on the t-case, as building a laramie with the off-road group still shows the buttons for the 44-44 in the pictures.
 

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I had seen this info a while back but havn't done any more research on it.

Auburn Hills, Michigan, March 27, 2018 – BorgWarner debuts its Electro-Mechanical On-Demand (EMOD) transfer case on the 2019 Ram 1500 4x4 pickup truck. Building on BorgWarner’s proven Torque-On-Demand® clutching system, the new EMOD technology delivers faster response and higher torque output for better on- and off-road performance. For automakers, the scalable system offers easy traction calibration and integration for a variety of vehicles, from small SUVs to heavy-duty pickup trucks.

“BorgWarner’s new EMOD transfer case features unmatched clutch control and actuation capabilities,” said Dr. Stefan Demmerle, President and General Manager, BorgWarner PowerDrive Systems. “BorgWarner has supplied on-demand transfer cases to Ram since 2010. We are proud to introduce our latest advancements in the next-generation Ram 1500.”

The heart of BorgWarner’s new EMOD transfer case is a motor-driven rotational cam mechanism which provides both robust clutch control and range shift function. The active clutch actuation technology delivers higher torque output, linear clutch response and pre-emptive clutch locking torque with zero rear wheel spin. For hill parking, the system offers the capability to hold front/rear locking torque when the ignition is off. In addition, the EMOD transfer case is equipped with BorgWarner’s HY-VO® driveline chain, optimized for high efficiency and durable performance.

And also this posting again from a different forum;

Transfer cases get upgrades Buyers who equip their 2019 Ram 1500 with a four-wheel drive drivetrain can choose between two electronically controlled transfer cases: the BorgWarner 48-12 for part-time 4WD operation with Hi and Low ranges; and the BorgWarner 48-11 for on-demand 4WD. Both transfer cases engage via a push-button control mounted underneath the rotary gear selector on the instrument panel.

The transfer cases are upgraded internally for more robust performance in conjunction with the increased payload and towing capabilities of the new truck. Changes include a larger-diameter main shaft, relocation of the chain and sprocket for improved bearing support, and improved lubrication. Also, the on-demand system is enhanced for quicker response and higher front output torque capacity.

The 48-12 part-time transfer case provides three operating ranges 2Hi (2WD), 4Hi (4WD) and 4Lo (low-range reduction 4WD) plus a neutral position. 2Hi is designed for any road surface at any time, while 4Hi and 4Lo are for offroad use or slick surfaces. The driver can switch between 2Hi and 4Hi while the truck is in motion. To engage 4Lo, the transmission must be in neutral.

The low-range reduction ratio (crawl ratio) for 4Lo is 2.64:1, which provides increased low-speed torque capability for pulling power and improved driver control in off-road conditions.

The on-demand transfer case has 4Auto, 2Hi, 4Hi and 4Lo selections. 4Auto provides full-time 4WD, responding automatically to provide maximum traction in all road conditions. 2Hi, 4Hi and 4Lo function equally to the part-time transfer case."
 

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It's been a few months since I researched this; but to the best of knowledge, the Rebel still has the clutchless transfer case (locking in 100% power to both front and rear driveshafts via gear engagement) and the rest have the clutch type transfer (which will "modulate" power to the front driveshaft via a clutched engagement). If you watch some of the first gen3Ecodiesel release videos too from Mopar, they talk about how the rebel has a slightly different DEF tank because of the transfer case packaging.

And just to clarify, the transfer case sends power to either the rear drive shaft, or both the front and rear driveshafts. The driveshaft then goes to the differential in the axle housing which modulates power to each axle shaft/wheel.

The front differential is an standard/open differential, it's splits power between the two wheels and gives 0-100% to either tire. When traction is poor, the wheel with the least resistance typically gets the power and the other wheel barely spins (example is 1 tire burn outs).

The rear differential comes standard as open, you can upgrade to anti-spin (posi, limited slip, whatever you want to call it) or you can get an electronically locking diff in the rear.

Again, open differential performs as described above.

A limited slip differential has a mechanical or friction locking mechanism that tries to apply power evenly to both tires, but still can unlock under certain conditions to allow the wheels spin at different speeds, like going around a turn. Depending on the design, they can either lock up more frequently or less frequently depending on the intended application. But at least you still get two wheels spinning usually.

A locking differential does just that, 100% locks the two axles/wheels and they both receive full power. Both tires will spin 100% at the same speed and never lose power.

Your truck likely has a limited slip rear differential. All 4 wheels are not each getting 100% power. Your front diff is still open, and your rear is just staying locked in when it's hopping.

I only explain this because though the clutch type transfer case was a negative check on my list, you can upgrade to an electronic locking rear (3.92 ratio only) from the factory. Having a fully locked rear axle will give you a guaranteed 100% power to both rear wheels, and then whatever else is being modulated upfront by the transfer case. Hopefully the upgrades described above ("Also, the on-demand system is enhanced for quicker response and higher front output torque capacity.") will be a significant improvement on how much power goes to the front shaft.

Just food for thought.

I've been doing extreme off roading for 2 decades; the single best (and cheapest) upgrade you can do for traction on any vehicle is to weld the rear differential completely together in the rear axle locking both axle shafts 100% all of the time. So to be able to get the factory electric locking diff upgrade is a huge improvement for traction in my opinion. A limited slip diff is only so effective.

On gen4 trucks, there was a mod where you could override the computer to give 100% lock up of the transfer case clutches to the front driveshaft.

Oh and I drove several Gen5 trucks, Limited, Longhorn, Rebel, and Laramie (no big horn or tradesman), but the Rebel definitely has the clutchless transfer and the other's have the clutch system. Don't rely on the ram build page and using the interior view design, the rendering is not always 100% accurate, i've seen several flaws when bouncing between the builds and options.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the super informative posts. Gives me a better understanding of why I like my non-clutch transfer case (I find the part-time terminology confusing) and the role that the F/R differentials play in the performance. It also gives me some hope that if I buy a 2020 or 21 that I might enjoy one of the new transfer cases with the electronic locking rear diff.
Seems to be an awfully important part of the truck yet it gets little discussion or mention by Ram.
 

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Differentials always send 100% of the avalible torque to both tires its just the torque output is limited by avalible traction, they dont send it one way or the other. All a limited slip or locker does is raise the available traction by locking the gears internally which increases the maximum torque output by increasing traction, aka the tire with less grip spins more but allows the tire with more grip to get the torque it needs. Yes it works and works well I dont want to own another truck with an open diff but lots of people have no clue how a diff actually works.
 

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Having a full locker differential is great if your dealing with mud, sand and snow but they can be a handful to deal with trying to drive on slick surfaces. Your turning can be greatly reduced and subsequent reaction of the vehicle of sliding out while turning happens.
Depending on the typical type of driving a limited slip may be useful more often.
 

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My 2020 has the Borg Warner 48-11. It has 4-High, 4-Low, Neutral, and 2-High...BUT it also has a 4-Auto selection. So, EVERYONE can have what they want with this t-case.

It very much reminds me of the old "Selec-Trac" t-cases in the Jeeps about 15-20 years ago. There is every setting you could possibly need for every situation. I LOVE it.
 

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I have The locking differential in my 2019 North Edition 1500 and it should only be used in 4 whl low in off road conditions, getting out of mud, sand, etc in a straight line..
If you're not off roading a lot suggest a limited slip rear end.

Owners manual:
"This vehicle is equipped with an electronically locking rear differential. This differential, when engaged, mechanically lock together the axle shafts forcing the wheels to spin at an equal rate. The locking of the rear differential should only be engaged during low-speed, extreme off-road situations where one wheel is likely to not be in contact with the ground. It is not recommended to drive the vehicle with the differentials locked on pavement due to the reduced ability to turn and speed limitations. Do not lock the rear axle on hard surfaced roads. The ability to steer the vehicle is reduced and damage to the drivetrain may occur when the axle is locked on hard surfaced roads. • Do not try to lock the rear axle if the vehicle is stuck and the tires are spinning. You can damage drivetrain components. Lock the rear axle before attempting situations or navigating terrain, which could possibly cause the vehicle to become stuck.The locking rear axle is controlled by the AXLE LOCKER button. Under normal driving conditions, the rear axle should be unlocked. During the command to lock the rear axle, the indicator light will flash until the axle is locked. After the lock command has been successfully executed, the light will remain on solid. Operating in 4WD LOW the locker can be engaged up to 40mph (64km/h) and will remain engaged throughout the 4WD LOW speed range.Operating the locker in 2WD, 4WD AUTO, and 4WD LOCK/HIGH the locker can be engaged up to 20mph (32km/h). While driving with the locker engaged, if speed exceeds 25mph (40km/h), the locker will automatically disengage, but will automatically reengage at 20mph (32km/h). NOTE: Left to right wheel speed difference may be necessary to allow the rear axle to fully lock. If the indicator light is flashing after selecting the rear axle lock mode, drive the vehicle in a turn or on loose gravel to expedite the locking action. The axle locker could become torque locked due to side to side loads on the rear axle. Driving slowly while turning the steering wheel from a left hand turn to a right hand turn or driving in REVERSE for a short distance may be required to release the torque lock and unlock the axles. To unlock the rear axle; push the AXLE LOCK button. The AXLE LOCK indicator light will go out when the rear axle is unlocked."
 

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Differentials always send 100% of the avalible torque to both tires its just the torque output is limited by avalible traction, they dont send it one way or the other. All a limited slip or locker does is raise the available traction by locking the gears internally which increases the maximum torque output by increasing traction, aka the tire with less grip spins more but allows the tire with more grip to get the torque it needs. Yes it works and works well I dont want to own another truck with an open diff but lots of people have no clue how a diff actually works.
I'm going to disagree with you.

"Differentials always send 100% of the available torque to both tires"
-Not Equally. And that was my explanation. The pinion sends 100% of the torque to the ring gear. The differential is bolted to the ring gear and that's what regulates what power goes to each axle.

A standard differential is bolted to the ring gear. It has 4 spider gears inside that allow the left and right axle shaft to potentially spin 100% INDEPENDENT of each other. Meaning the right axle could travel 100% that the ring gear does, and the left axle could travel 0%. Even if you've never pulled a diff apart, the example of a 1 tire burn out completely solidifies this. Or just google it or you tube standard/open differential.

"All a limited slip or locker does is raise the available traction by locking the gears internally which increases the maximum torque output by increasing traction"
-a limited slip has clutch packs that are mated with the side spider gears and the axle shaft; interlocking steel plates connect it to the diff housing with is connected to the ring gear; the wheel with more traction puts extra torque through the axle which loads the side spider gear and it pushes the clutch pack on that side tighter together. So there is a standard load on each clutch pack from an internal spring, and then dependent on which wheel has more traction, more torque is applied through that wheel, loading the spider gear and locking up the clutch on that side tighter. And the clutches still have a torque limit and can slip.

"lots of people have no clue how a diff actually works."
i agree
 

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Having a full locker differential is great if your dealing with mud, sand and snow but they can be a handful to deal with trying to drive on slick surfaces. Your turning can be greatly reduced and subsequent reaction of the vehicle of sliding out while turning happens.
Depending on the typical type of driving a limited slip may be useful more often.
Yea it definitely depends on application and what situation you're in. I wouldn't run it locked unless i was really struggling or trying to get out of tough spot.

A fully locked rear will try to push you in a straight line, correct. both rear wheels are spinning at the same speed. so you need to front axle to pull you for steering.

I only explained differentials because the OP said all 4 wheels had power in reference to the t-case. But it's not the t-case that fully determines that. Hence my above explanations. And he referenced mud, snow, etc for when he wants traction, so i figured if he was torn about the most traction possible, or thinking he was losing out with a clutch t-case, there was more for him to consider, since he only mentioned t-case and not differential.

In my opinion, if you put the vehicle in 4wd, even with a clutch pack t-case, it'll be get along just fine. The only videos I see of guys giving examples of them have bad traction and the t-case being slow to lock up is in slow moving deep snow or mud. In that situation i'd just engage the rear locker and get to where i need to be. If the t-case is load dependent (which i think the electronics modulate and it is), it takes a little before it sees the load and then locks the clutches. And that's what some guys complain about in the slow moving stuff. But in reality, if you're just moving along and that slip starts to occur, the front should lock up before you come to a stop. Then you're just left dealing with the open front differential and 1 wheel peel.
 

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I'm going to disagree with you.

"Differentials always send 100% of the available torque to both tires"
-Not Equally. And that was my explanation. The pinion sends 100% of the torque to the ring gear. The differential is bolted to the ring gear and that's what regulates what power goes to each axle.

A standard differential is bolted to the ring gear. It has 4 spider gears inside that allow the left and right axle shaft to potentially spin 100% INDEPENDENT of each other. Meaning the right axle could travel 100% that the ring gear does, and the left axle could travel 0%. Even if you've never pulled a diff apart, the example of a 1 tire burn out completely solidifies this. Or just google it or you tube standard/open differential.

"All a limited slip or locker does is raise the available traction by locking the gears internally which increases the maximum torque output by increasing traction"
-a limited slip has clutch packs that are mated with the side spider gears and the axle shaft; interlocking steel plates connect it to the diff housing with is connected to the ring gear; the wheel with more traction puts extra torque through the axle which loads the side spider gear and it pushes the clutch pack on that side tighter together. So there is a standard load on each clutch pack from an internal spring, and then dependent on which wheel has more traction, more torque is applied through that wheel, loading the spider gear and locking up the clutch on that side tighter. And the clutches still have a torque limit and can slip.

"lots of people have no clue how a diff actually works."
i agree
I've rebuilt plenty and understand how they work. They always send 100% of available torque to both you should research more and the actual physics of whats going on.
 

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I've rebuilt plenty and understand how they work. They always send 100% of available torque to both you should research more and the actual physics of whats going on.
Sir, explain to me 1 wheel burnouts then. How is 100% torque going to both tires, when 1 is spinning and the other is standing still?

Go ahead and find me factual documents that support your claim and post them here.

Or just google something. like this.

You also haven't explained any mechanics of the system. So i wont' just take your word.

I gave factual information on the mechanics and also the physics of how the torque load on the axle with traction trys to push the spider gears apart which loads the clutch pack more in a limited slip.

Thanks.
 

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Sir, explain to me 1 wheel burnouts then. How is 100% torque going to both tires, when 1 is spinning and the other is standing still?
This statement:
Differentials always send 100% of the avalible torque to both tires its just the torque output is limited by avalible traction
The torque is there, it's just not going where you want it
 

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This statement:
The torque is there, it's just not going where you want it
I said how is torque going to both tires?
You're telling me both tires are seeing 500 ft/lbs of torque out of that powerstroke and 1 is just gripping the road and the other is just peeling away?

100% torque is going to the RING gear and the differential determines what split of 100% goes to each axle.

Did you even watch the youtube explanation?
 

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I said how is torque going to both tires?
You're telling me both tires are seeing 500 ft/lbs of torque out of that powerstroke and 1 is just gripping the road and the other is just peeling away?

100% torque is going to the RING gear and the differential determines what split of 100% goes to each axle.

Did you even watch the youtube explanation?
In a roundabout way, yes all the torque is present at both wheels but the friction coefficient or there a lack of determines where it escapes. If the vehicle has traction control, that applies ABS braking to the spinning wheel to force torque to the other wheel.
Think of torque going to the rear wheels through a differential as water, it will find the path of least resistance. Traction Control, LSD and Lockers would be like dams forcing the torque where it needs to go.
 

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In a roundabout way, yes all the torque is present at both wheels but the friction coefficient or there a lack of determines where it escapes. If the vehicle has traction control, that applies ABS braking to the spinning wheel to force torque to the other wheel.
Think of torque going to the rear wheels through a differential as water, it will find the path of least resistance. Traction Control, LSD and Lockers would be like dams forcing the torque where it needs to go.
I agree on your explanation of traction control.

Again, I can't understand how you just told me you believe how all of the torque is present at both wheels. That does not happen in an open diff, because it can split that 100% between each axle however it wants; 50/50; 85/15; 100/0. Opposed to when a diff is locked up; if it really is seeing all of that torque at each wheel and one wheel isn't moving because of extreme traction, guess what happens: either the tire breaks lose, the axle shaft snaps, or the ring and pinion blow apart. That's why a locker can be harmful.

Using your water analogy; the differential is simply a proportioning valve. 100% of water is flowing in to the differential; and it can proportion what percent of that 100% goes to each axle dude. If 100% is going in and you're saying 50% is always going to each tire, then THEY WOULD ALWAYS SPIN AT THE SAME RATE. That's what a locker does, it's a proportioning valve set at 50/50 no matter what.

"Think of torque going to the rear wheels through a differential as water, it will find the path of least resistance. "
Right, the past of least resistance. So 100% of the water goes to one wheel, not both, when 1 wheel is on ice. So they both don't see equal torque.

I'm not going to comment anymore on this. Appreciate the discussion. (y)
 

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ya know, i think i might understand where we disagree. and i'm wrong depending on how you read things. So i apologize.

In an open diff, there is always equal torque to each axle shaft (yes, I stand corrected), but unequal rotational force can be present. But that torque varies depending on traction. So it could be very little torque to both wheels if one is slipping.

I was trying to focus on what torque is always applied to each wheel as that's is what is the power to the ground.

I'll follow up later but wanted to say I stand corrected on that concept of terminology.
 

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Well I learned something. And i'll be the first to comment that i'm an idiot.

When it was said that an open differential spreads the input torque between each axle 50/50, that was correct. The issue that comes in to play is what amount of force can actually be put to the ground. If one wheel is on dry road and the other on snow, the wheel on snow can only hold X amount of torque (where this is a low number because of the lack of friction). And that means the wheel on dry also only receives that low amount of X torque. And once the wheel starts to spin, it receives even less torque, putting less torque on the dry wheel also (the same amount).

I was hung up on what amount of that power actually goes to the ground. And also what amount of input torque is actually carried through as output Force to the ground (which i was calling torque).

It makes sense that the locked differential is the one that splits the torque it whatever ratio. So when one wheel spins, the wheel on dry can see much more torque, and well, that's what breaks stuff.

This video explained it all. My bad for misunderstanding the concept.

Sorry to get off topic.
 

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In regards to deciding on the truck because of the t-case and or adding the e-locker; my thoughts for traction weren't cruising down the road at 50mph in 5 inches of snow. I think an open diff will be just fine then.

I envisioned pulling my boat out of the water at the launch. I fish in the winter, and sometimes the ramp is partially snow or ice covered. And after some high water, the ramp gets mud on it. With both tires locked via an electric locker, i know I have the best chance of applying the most force to the ground for traction out of the rear axle.

Or if the ground is wet or there is some snow down and I'm towing my jeep trailer up through my steep yard. Both rear tires locked would be my best chance for traction.

Here's a video i found of a 2016 laramie limited; so it should have the clutch type system. The video shows the comparison of wheel performance in each mode. it looks to me like the computer does a good job of locking the t-case clutch system to put power to the front shaft. the new version is claimed to be improved also...
 
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