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Just joined to share my story. I bought my 2021 Limited with the EcoDiesel on May 7. I average 1k miles per week which is why I got rid of my 2019 2500 with the 6.4 gas Hemi. My truck has been absolutely flawless and averages 26.5mpg unloaded and 22mpg with 5k trailer. 2 days ago I was sitting a stoplight and when it turned green I went to accelerate and looked down at the dash. It said push the brake and press the start button. I just assumed it just shut off. It fired back up and sputtered a few feet before shutting off. I called Chrysler Roadside and had it towed to Orlando Dodge. I had driven 150 miles on the last fill-up so I was hoping they wouldn't try to blame the fuel. Dealer texted me yesterday saying the pump sent metal into the injectors and they would be replacing the entire fuel system including the fuel tank. Not sure when they will get the parts to fix it, I would assume a week at least.

I assumed I wouldn't have issues until a few years. I drive 50k+ miles a year and this has me concerned, especially since my warranty will be over in less than 2 years. The fuel savings makes this purchase worth $500/month, but I don't want to save it for fuel system problems on year 3+

I will keep this post updated as I find out more about the failure. Service advisor says this is the first he's heard of this. I'm not sure he's BSing or not.
 

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2015 Outdoorsman EcoD CC w/6.4' 4X4
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Your not the first to have a HPFP failure but it's rare occurrence. There's probably been a handful reported since this forum started. There have been quite a few on the other hand that have racked up 100s of thousands of miles without issue. With so few miles I would suspect it was more of an initial manufacturing defect than a fuel related failure.
 

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The Ram 2500 eats these pumps like candy. Thankfully they nipped it in the bud and went back to the old CP3 style pump for 2021.

The Ram 1500/Jeep Gladiator don't seem to blow them as often.
 

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The Ram 2500 eats these pumps like candy.
And is based from actual facts or something that's been perpetuated from rumor, hearsay along with the bad rap from the VW days when the original CP4 design was ran without a lift pump?
 

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And is based from actual facts or something that's been perpetuated from rumor, hearsay along with the bad rap from the VW days when the original CP4 design was ran without a lift pump?
Based upon the fact that you can't swing a dead cat without hitting a "CP4 failure" thread on the Ram HD forums, complete with the full story and pictures and the accompanying sob story about waiting 3-5 months to get the parts to fix the truck.

I mean, that's hands down the #1 topic on every Cummins forum I've been on.

I suppose all those guys could be lying. That's possible. But I doubt it.

And why would Cummins switch to a completely different fuel system for two model years, and then switch back without even mentioning it? That's a ton of money to reverse course. And to do it quietly? Hmm.. Yep, they knew there was a problem. A big problem. And from what I heard, they basically told FCA that they would no longer risk ruining their hallowed brand name by using that CP4 garbage on their engines. Remember, the CP4 was a manufacturing money saving ploy from the start. So, the rest is history...
 

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If your pump failed that early, there are a few possible reasons. Most obvious is that you had contaminated fuel but sounds like the dealer didn't check or at least didn't argue about it. You may still want to contact the last place you got fuel and see if there were any other reported failures.

Second option is that there was crap left in the lines or tank from assembly. Not as common but it does happen from time to time.

Third option is that maybe the dealer put DEF into the fuel tank when they prepped the truck and it's taken this long to fail.
 

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Based upon the fact that you can't swing a dead cat without hitting a "CP4 failure" thread on the Ram HD forums, complete with the full story and pictures and the accompanying sob story about waiting 3-5 months to get the parts to fix the truck.

I mean, that's hands down the #1 topic on every Cummins forum I've been on.

I suppose all those guys could be lying. That's possible. But I doubt it.

And why would Cummins switch to a completely different fuel system for two model years, and then switch back without even mentioning it? That's a ton of money to reverse course. And to do it quietly? Hmm.. Yep, they knew there was a problem. A big problem. And from what I heard, they basically told FCA that they would no longer risk ruining their hallowed brand name by using that CP4 garbage on their engines. Remember, the CP4 was a manufacturing money saving ploy from the start. So, the rest is history...
its not that they are lying. It is however an example of sample and confirmation bias.

Most cummins owners are not running to the boards because their pumps didn't fail. the absolute majority don't have these issues. like >98% most likely. Are there more failures? Yes. CP4 is a bit problematic for sure. is it a sky falling issue? no. Eat pumps like candy? nope. not really. Bring up some actual stats rather than just perusing the forums and maybe this would be more credible.

this place is a great example. We have a failure thread going. for a while it seemed like the EcoD world wa ending. it didn't and failure rates are somewhere in the 3-6% rates. Thats bad. don't get me wrong. But its not eating engines like candy.

Point is, gotta moderate what you read on forums. Impressions tend to get painted with a 10 mile wide brush.
 

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its not that they are lying. It is however an example of sample and confirmation bias.

Most cummins owners are not running to the boards because their pumps didn't fail. the absolute majority don't have these issues. like >98% most likely. Are there more failures? Yes. CP4 is a bit problematic for sure. is it a sky falling issue? no. Eat pumps like candy? nope. not really. Bring up some actual stats rather than just perusing the forums and maybe this would be more credible.

this place is a great example. We have a failure thread going. for a while it seemed like the EcoD world wa ending. it didn't and failure rates are somewhere in the 3-6% rates. Thats bad. don't get me wrong. But its not eating engines like candy.

Point is, gotta moderate what you read on forums. Impressions tend to get painted with a 10 mile wide brush.
oh and for the record... 3-6% fail rate is not acceptable and i think FCA should get a kick in the gonads for this.
 

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Sorry to here, Christian Dionne. The good news is that CP4 pumps failures are very rare. We've seen EcoDiesel engines with 400,000+ miles with the factory CP4 pump. It's hard telling what caused your CP4 pump to fail (fuel related or manufacturing issue). If you haven't already, I would encourage you to fill-up at reputable fuel stations. I fill-up at Love's Truck Stops as I travel across the country since they are known for good fuel plus they have biodiesel blends at most of their stations nationwide. Both of my trucks get a minimum of B5 with every fill-up and sometimes as high as B20. According to independent studies, B2 will outperform any fuel additive on the market in lubrication. The CP4 pump needs good lubrication.
 
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All the research I've done says that Eco and Cummins pump failures are rare. The exception is the 2019-20 Cummins (requiring higher fuel pressure) have a failure rate of approx 1% (certainly not like eating candy). And, of the 1%, mostly due to contaminated or low quality fuel.

My dealership has not seen a pump failure on the Ecos or the Cummins, and they sell and service a lot of trucks. My Service Manager showed me the bottle they have for any pump failure. If they get a pump failure they must first take a fuel sample, seal the bottle and send it to FCA for analysis after which they are directed on how to proceed. He was also a VW Service Manager and said most of the VW failures were because at some point gas was introduced to the fuel system.
 

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All the research I've done says that Eco and Cummins pump failures are rare. The exception is the 2019-20 Cummins (requiring higher fuel pressure) have a failure rate of approx 1% (certainly not like eating candy). And, of the 1%, mostly due to contaminated or low quality fuel.

My dealership has not seen a pump failure on the Ecos or the Cummins, and they sell and service a lot of trucks. My Service Manager showed me the bottle they have for any pump failure. If they get a pump failure they must first take a fuel sample, seal the bottle and send it to FCA for analysis after which they are directed on how to proceed. He was also a VW Service Manager and said most of the VW failures were because at some point gas was introduced to the fuel system.
That's in Europe. Here in the U.S., I've seen that number from 7 to 9%. Think about that...SEVEN percent of your product going out the door will fail. That's horrible business. Which is precisely why GM scrapped the Bosch system completely and found a new vendor, and Ram ditched the CP4 and went back to a CP3 derived version with even more updates (sometimes referred to as the CP-ISB). <1% failure rate is pretty common in mass production of any kind. When you start creeping up on 10% failure rate, that's not good.

I call it a case of the trucks eating the pumps like candy.

Crazy thing is, Ford continues to use the CP4, despite being involved in numerous lawsuits over it.

"Today’s Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD) does not contain the lubricity needed to fully protect our vehicles. The Bosch CP4 fuel pump has an unusually high failure rate in the U.S., upwards of 7%, when compared to 1% failure rate in Europe."

"The lack of lubricity in ULSD is the main factor in the catastrophic failures of the CP4 Fuel pumps. High rates of wear introduce metal shavings into the fuel system, creating wear that damages your injectors, cylinder walls, pistons and rings costing several thousands of dollars to repair."
 

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We all know that CP4 failures are attributed to fuel quality, primarily lubricity. And, the pump was designed for Europe's fuel standards which are higher than USA's. And, standards vary among the states.

The obvious answer, to prevent failures, is to use an additive that increases the fuel's quality, especially adding lubricity. That’s what I do.
 
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The obvious answer, to prevent failures, is to use an additive that increases the fuel's quality, especially adding lubricity. That’s what I do.
That's why I try to run biodiesel in every tank. When not running biodiesel, I use Hot Shot's Secret.
 
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Just wanted to jump on here because I had a pump failure at 44k miles on my 2020 RAM Rebel ED. Took about a month to get parts in to even fix it. They basically replaced the whole fuel delivery system. Hoping when I go to pick it up ill have more answers WHY it happened since FCA did not give me any info when dealing with this. (they also were terrible to deal with on getting the parts in)
 

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They will never tell you the whole "why". Heck, they may not even know why yours failed but the ones of the line before and after yours did not. As biodiesel mentioned above, make sure you're getting fuel at a reputable station with high diesel turn over. I don't use Love's downhere becasue they are typically at dime or maore higher than other stations. I use a QT that always has a lot of service trucks and landscapers filling their diesels. I only use an additive in the winter if heading north.
 

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They will never tell you the whole "why". Heck, they may not even know why yours failed but the ones of the line before and after yours did not. As biodiesel mentioned above, make sure you're getting fuel at a reputable station with high diesel turn over. I don't use Love's downhere becasue they are typically at dime or maore higher than other stations. I use a QT that always has a lot of service trucks and landscapers filling their diesels. I only use an additive in the winter if heading north.
My last tank of gas was from chevron. Usually I’d say that’s pretty good station but shoot maybe I just got the short straw. When the pump failed I was at a 1/4 of a tank.
I got some amsoil all in one diesel for future fill ups. A buddy of mine suggested it.
 

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Make sure the label says that it's good for 2007 and up diesels. Some stuff out there was developed before the switch over to ULSD and commonrail diesels. If it's not developed for the DPF, you can create issues.
 
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