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I posted this paper on diesel additive lubricity back in 2014 and it is quite old now, but I believe that the information presented is still pertinent.

https://www.jatonkam35s.com/DeuceTechnicalManuals/Diesel_fuel_additive_test.pdf
As you point out Gene, the study is old. It sure would be nice if someone somewhere would test modern day pump ULSD for lubricity and determine if the products that were tested and still exist with the same name are indeed the same formulation. If I were going to use a lubricity additive using the data in this test I would try and get the manufacturer to tell me if it still is the same product today as it was in 2007.

Everytime I reread this study I am amazed that some products resulted in worse wear than untreated raw ULSD.
 

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As you point out Gene, the study is old. It sure would be nice if someone somewhere would test modern day pump ULSD for lubricity and determine if the products that were tested and still exist with the same name are indeed the same formulation. If I were going to use a lubricity additive using the data in this test I would try and get the manufacturer to tell me if it still is the same product today as it was in 2007.

Everytime I reread this study I am amazed that some products resulted in worse wear than untreated raw ULSD.
Yes, since that 2007 test many new additives have appeared using updated or new modern-day components/chemicals. A re-run of that or a similar unbiased test would be revealing.
With CP4 pumps on so many trucks, a valid lubricity test would really help us.
 
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Hi I am new to the group, so Hello! I have a question. My Dad has a 2006 Cummins and when I bought my 3.0 2015, He suggested that I add a pint of oil when I filled up. He said that it adds lubrication to the injectors. Will this help or hurt the 3.0? By the way He has almost 600K on His Cummins. Thank you for your expertise.

As other have said, don't do it. You will kiss your warranty (if you have one) and emission system good bye. You might even kill the injectors/injection pump.
 

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As you point out Gene, the study is old. It sure would be nice if someone somewhere would test modern day pump ULSD for lubricity and determine if the products that were tested and still exist with the same name are indeed the same formulation. If I were going to use a lubricity additive using the data in this test I would try and get the manufacturer to tell me if it still is the same product today as it was in 2007.

Everytime I reread this study I am amazed that some products resulted in worse wear than untreated raw ULSD.
The most interesting things for me were that some additives reduced the lubricity, so one should be careful about adding 2 stroke oil, etc. and that simple bio diesel was the best lubricity enhancer. That likely still holds true.
 

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Yes, I know about Amsoil's claims here. In fact I have somewhere between $1000 and $1500 of various Amsoil products on my shelves in the garage for my own use. I like their products and think their technology is first class. Nowadays I am moving away from them since proper synthetic gas and diesel engine oil is marketed at competitive price by the major oil companies and Shell, XOM and CHevron sell first class products and have a name brand and reputation to protect. However I still prefer Amsoil for greases, transmission and rear end lubricants, 2 stroke oil, their old car flat tappet oil and their 0W40 ATV/Snowmobile oil. ANyhow, my problem with their technical data is it is often unreferenced and typically features one (that advantages their product) of multiple tests that are required to qualify a product. I have asked their technical department to provide the full suite of technical tests required to qualify a specific oil vs their competitors and they have always declined to do so.

ANyhow, ref the chart you posted it has been on their website for several years so who knows how it compares to pump fuel today. I am always suspicious of marketing claims, especially when they lack appropriate references and are unwilling to share complete results.

We really need either an independent organization to do the tests or an ASTM type test where every manufacturer lists the results of those tests in their product literature.

All the best,
 

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Oil Analyzers did the testing.
You can easily have base fuel tested by sending them a sample. Same with additive added in proper dose. Cost is always the issue.

Yes, I know about Amsoil's claims here. In fact I have somewhere between $1000 and $1500 of various Amsoil products on my shelves in the garage for my own use. I like their products and think their technology is first class. Nowadays I am moving away from them since proper synthetic gas and diesel engine oil is marketed at competitive price by the major oil companies and Shell, XOM and CHevron sell first class products and have a name brand and reputation to protect. However I still prefer Amsoil for greases, transmission and rear end lubricants, 2 stroke oil, their old car flat tappet oil and their 0W40 ATV/Snowmobile oil. ANyhow, my problem with their technical data is it is often unreferenced and typically features one (that advantages their product) of multiple tests that are required to qualify a product. I have asked their technical department to provide the full suite of technical tests required to qualify a specific oil vs their competitors and they have always declined to do so.

ANyhow, ref the chart you posted it has been on their website for several years so who knows how it compares to pump fuel today. I am always suspicious of marketing claims, especially when they lack appropriate references and are unwilling to share complete results.

We really need either an independent organization to do the tests or an ASTM type test where every manufacturer lists the results of those tests in their product literature.

All the best,
 

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Oil Analyzers did the testing.
You can easily have base fuel tested by sending them a sample. Same with additive added in proper dose. Cost is always the issue.
Yes, I use Amsoil's Oil Analyzers to do my oil analysis. I find their results consistent and they are less expensive than Blackstone and many others. I have also talked to their techs many times and they seem knowledgeable and some of the technical papers on their site are good.

I am not going to do an additive test myself, especially since my new truck has a Pentastar engine and my Volvo, Cumminx, Perkins and Mitsubishi diesels in other things I own do not have the emissions issues of a modern onroad engine, thank goodness.

If a thousand people contributed $50 each a new study could probably be done. I'd contribute $50 to the effort just as a matter of interest. Perhaps one of you young tech savy guys will do one of those go fund me campaigns and get one going. It would be of far more value than many of the things I hear them doing
 

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ONe thing that would be interesting in such a study is fuel supplied by different brands, They all have their own additive package so it would be good to know which one's really do the best job for todays diesels.
 

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To make it really simple

Don't add any additives to the fuel; just use regular diesel fuel, nothing more or less.
Same advice as the owners manual. Also the simplest, cheapest and easiest.

'Some' additives are beneficial, some aren't and some are harmful. Make your world alittle easier and just walk by that section of the auto parts store. :)
 

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To make it really simple

Don't add any additives to the fuel; just use regular diesel fuel, nothing more or less.
Same advice as the owners manual. Also the simplest, cheapest and easiest.

'Some' additives are beneficial, some aren't and some are harmful. Make your world alittle easier and just walk by that section of the auto parts store. :)
You are with the majority of the diesel owners who never add an additive. Additives are a personal choice for whatever reason. I would like to know why you say some are harmful. Not to challenge you only because I am an additive dealer and have done considerable research and have never read or heard of any additive being a problem or harmful.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Thank you all for your comments/recommendations they are greatly appreciated! Another question I have is, is it better to buy my fuel at a truck stop or a gas station? I am weary of buying from a gas station, such as Hucks etc., because I am afraid their diesel has been in the tank and may be bad, whereas the tanks at the truck stop are fueled more frequently due to the volume of fuel that is sold. Thanks for your advice
 

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As long as the station has good trun over, it doesn't matter where you purchase. I have one station that often has lower prices but they only have one diesel pump stuck in the corner of the parking lot. There's not even a large diesel mess around the pump, so I doubt they're even going through a tanker a month. The station I use the most does a lot of business with lawn service companies. All with 3/4 or full ton diesels.
 

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You are with the majority of the diesel owners who never add an additive. Additives are a personal choice for whatever reason. I would like to know why you say some are harmful. Not to challenge you only because I am an additive dealer and have done considerable research and have never read or heard of any additive being a problem or harmful.
here is a excerpt from the report Anomaly posted. Their reference was raw untreated ULSD before the supplier/marketer had added their additives to meet US specs.

14) Lucas Upper Cylinder Lubricant Gas or Diesel HFRR 641, 5 microns worse than baseline (statistically insignificant change) 427:1 ratio 7.8 oz/tank $2.65/tank
15) B1000 Diesel Fuel Conditioner by Milligan Biotech Multi-purpose, canola oil based additive HFRR 644, 8 microns worse than baseline (statistically insignificant change) 1000:1 ratio 3.32 oz/tank $2.67/tank Copyright© The Diesel Place & A. D. Spicer August, 2007 - 8 -
16) FPPF Lubricity Plus Fuel Power Multi-purpose + anti-gel Emulsifier, alcohol free HFRR 675, 39 microns worse than baseline fuel 1000:1 ratio 3.32 oz/tank $1.12/tank
17) Marvel Mystery Oil Gas, Oil and Diesel fuel additive (NOT ULSD compliant, may damage 2007 and newer systems) HFRR 678, 42 microns worse than baseline fuel. 320:1 ratio 10.4 oz/tank $3.22/tank
18) ValvTect Diesel Guard Heavy Duty/Marine Diesel Fuel Additive Multi-purpose Cetane improver, Emulsifier, alcohol free HFRR 696, 60 microns worse than baseline fuel 1000:1 ratio 3.32 oz/tank $2.38/tank
19) Primrose Power Blend 2003 Multi-purpose Cetane boost, bio-diesel compatible, Emulsifier HFRR 711, 75 microns worse than baseline 1066:1 ratio 3.12 oz/tank $1.39/tank
 

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Howie,
That data proves nothing regards additives harming engines.
That some additives are worse than baseline doesn't equate to they cause problems. That data is 13 years old and has had plenty of time for a worse than baseline additive to cause harm, and what harm do we have reported, nada! I stand by my statement that there are no cases of any current additive made for diesel engines harming or causing a problem.

In 13 years there's been so much learned and new ingredients to produce additives that perform as advertised. Today's additive companies employ chemists & engineers and do considerable testing to assure effective and safe products.
 
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