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Not sure if others agree but it seems as though the number of engine failures have dropped off dramatically. I would like to explain why I ask, I had a complete engine replacement done at 77,000 miles. At 80,000 I got the GDE and at 140,000 I was dumb and got the "Fix" so I lost my GDE because the $3K settlement was too tempting.

If the high number of engine failures are down I would like to just get the full delete from HD Diesel and run the truck into the ground

If we are still experiencing the crazy amount of Catastrophic engine failures I may decide to get out now and sell.

I would like to hear if you recently had a engine replacement.
 

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There have been several theories to the cause of engine bearing failures. Here are a few that have been discussed over the past five years.

- Factory flaw of materials or improper assembly.

- Fuel dilution of oil caused by excessive regeneration.

- Improper viscosity. It is believed that some FCA service departments and quick change establishments mis-fill with Pentastar spec oil which is 20 weight.

- Crankcase overfill. If the crankcase is overfilled, the crank can whip the oil into a froth which fills the oil galleries up with bubbles.

- Crankcase underfill.

- Oil pump pickup slow to bleed off the air pocket pressure after a drain and re-fill of crankcase. Hence the recommendation to wait a few minutes after oil change to crank engine.

- Weak or faulty oil pump.

- Low rpm lugging of the engine, especially under load.

- Excessive idling which can cause fuel dilution of the oil.

- Running rich due to faulty sensors, injectors, or turbo which can cause fuel dilution.

- Not warming up the engine prior to hard use.

- Driving the ED like it was a Hemi Hellcat.

- Tunes or being non-tuned.

- And, I think the number one theory is soot saturation of the oil caused by an over active evil EGR.

Any of the above could be the cause of engines failures depending upon the expert you are talking to at the time. Many of the above have probably been the cause of engine failures, and in some failures I expect a combination of the above.

Without inspection of the failed engines and diagnostics of the vehicle systems, we will never know the major cause of ED bearing failure.
 

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Let’s just say I know what the rumor going around at the Chrysler Training centers was, based on what Engineering was telling them.
And the oil viscosity change effectively acts as a Damper. It’s likely a harmonic frequency, it typically occurs at around 1200 RPMs, and it becomes a significant problem under a load, when it reaches a certain amplitude at the resonant frequency. The thicker oil helped raise the amplitude required.
 

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Let’s just say I know what the rumor going around at the Chrysler Training centers was, based on what Engineering was telling them.
And the oil viscosity change effectively acts as a Damper. It’s likely a harmonic frequency, it typically occurs at around 1200 RPMs, and it becomes a significant problem under a load, when it reaches a certain amplitude at the resonant frequency. The thicker oil helped raise the amplitude required.
Yep, number 8 on my list above.
 

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A very large number of the trucks, when the failure occurred, were under significant loads, at low RPM - Towing while not being in Tow-Haul was deemed the most likely cause of them seeing the significant loads.
Someone here posted recent, his was experiencing a driveshaft failure at the time it spun the bearings. I saw a guy post in a Facebook group, yesterday, about a sudden failure - he’s concerned with being able to tow with the replacement truck - and I strongly suspect that is the cause of the majority of the failures....

Then, there’s the ones who are going too far on their oil changes.... but that’s not a design issue either!

So, again, much like the 44-46RE Overdrive unit failures in the 90s, the majority of the failures are owner induced by lack of proper maintenance, or misuse, if I had to guess. I only had my first one for a little over 60K, but spent a good bit of time towing a 24’ Enclosed, 27’ with the V nose, and never had any issues. But I wouldn’t tow my lawn mower trailer empty without being in tow/haul, because I had been warned!
 

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When I did IT work, before deciding on Automotive Technician as my chosen profession, we had a saying for that -

We would document that the customer was having an ID10T Operator error!

Most never got it, except for a few that were writing out the call for documentation purposes as well! Kinda self explanatory, I thought, that they didn’t realize.
 

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I think the current transmission calibration is helping the lugging issue. I notice that mine will downshift at the slightest hint of extra load. I’m perfectly fine with that. It doesn’t ever feel like this engine is working too hard. I don’t use tow/haul a lot but I generally tow pretty light. I have a pretty good feel for when a vehicle is working harder than I think is normal And I don’t ever push it harder than I think the vehicle can handle. I must be doing something right. I have A 2007 hemi that I’ve owned since new that has 345,000 miles on it now.
 

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I think the current transmission calibration is helping the lugging issue. I notice that mine will downshift at the slightest hint of extra load. I’m perfectly fine with that. It doesn’t ever feel like this engine is working too hard. I don’t use tow/haul a lot but I generally tow pretty light. I have a pretty good feel for when a vehicle is working harder than I think is normal And I don’t ever push it harder than I think the vehicle can handle. I must be doing something right. I have A 2007 hemi that I’ve owned since new that has 345,000 miles on it now.
Good to see an owner who noticed they changed that! It still won’t compensate 100%.
 

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A very large number of the trucks, when the failure occurred, were under significant loads, at low RPM - Towing while not being in Tow-Haul was deemed the most likely cause of them seeing the significant loads.
Someone here posted recent, his was experiencing a driveshaft failure at the time it spun the bearings.
if memory serves me correctly that a vast majority if not overwhelmingly number of engine failures that we've seen reported were trucks with the 3.55 gearing
 

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My engine hasn't had an opportunity to fail lately because I don't use it as we are more or less hanging out at home.

3/4 if a tank of diesel in it and I filled it over 3 weeks ago.....

I am waiting for all of this to calm down to walk into my dealer and offer them 30/40k off of that new 2020 limited they have on the lot...


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if memory serves me correctly that a vast majority if not overwhelmingly number of engine failures that we've seen reported were trucks with the 3.55 gearing
That could easily contribute! It adds load compared to the shorter gears!

I liked the changes they highlighted on the training for the Gen3 - a good bit of stuff was bulked up and stiffened up in some strategic areas around the crank - basically, the changes look aimed at changing the resonance frequency, and minimizing flex - which lends itself to the above observations as well.

As I said, I don’t think it was incorrectly designed, just unable to handle parameters not intended.
I also see a lot of people that run 10K on T6, and have never had an analysis, when others have posted UOAs from T6 showing it used up in 7K...

Myself, I run Red Line, or AMSOIL Signature, and other high end proven oils that will easily make the factory interval.

And I’ll be the first to say, there’s a small percentage that would failregardless. That’s been true of everything ever made by man! But I gotta think this issue is primarily caused by owners too stupid to own their truck!

Any of you around for the 90s would remember the horror stories about Chrysler transmissions - the trucks were notorious for burning up transmissions. Idiots were towing in O/D, and the O/D unit was not made to tow!
Chrysler shot themselves in the foot, calling ATF+3 fill for life - it needed to be changed every 30K.
Same story - owners killed them by the thousands, because they didn’t follow the recommendations....
Over 90% of all 40/41/42TE transmissions called back for testing had an additive, or the wrong fluid in them - so was there really a major problem with those?
 

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I made a thread about it earlier. My 2017, bought new in Jan of 2018 had a failed engine at 27K miles last month. official statement on the repair ticket was "excessive rod bearing wear". Truck was a daily driver, taken on a few trips, never used for towing. All maint was done at the purchasing dealership, no mods on the truck.
 

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That could easily contribute! It adds load compared to the shorter gears!

I liked the changes they highlighted on the training for the Gen3 - a good bit of stuff was bulked up and stiffened up in some strategic areas around the crank - basically, the changes look aimed at changing the resonance frequency, and minimizing flex - which lends itself to the above observations as well.

As I said, I don’t think it was incorrectly designed, just unable to handle parameters not intended.
I also see a lot of people that run 10K on T6, and have never had an analysis, when others have posted UOAs from T6 showing it used up in 7K...

Myself, I run Red Line, or AMSOIL Signature, and other high end proven oils that will easily make the factory interval.

And I’ll be the first to say, there’s a small percentage that would failregardless. That’s been true of everything ever made by man! But I gotta think this issue is primarily caused by owners too stupid to own their truck!

Any of you around for the 90s would remember the horror stories about Chrysler transmissions - the trucks were notorious for burning up transmissions. Idiots were towing in O/D, and the O/D unit was not made to tow!
Chrysler shot themselves in the foot, calling ATF+3 fill for life - it needed to be changed every 30K.
Same story - owners killed them by the thousands, because they didn’t follow the recommendations....
Over 90% of all 40/41/42TE transmissions called back for testing had an additive, or the wrong fluid in them - so was there really a major problem with those?
Can you point me to the posts of people running T6 and having run a test that showed that the 10k intervals was not sufficient?

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Can you point me to the posts of people running T6 and having run a test that showed that the 10k intervals was not sufficient?

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Early on when fca switched there paid endorsement there was a lot of samples showing the t6 shearing into 5w-30 viscosity within 5-7k. But when the oil switched from cj to ck t6 got a lot better and now usually tests good to around 12k.
 
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