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This will be my first diesel engine. Are all diesel stations the same? We have Krist Oil, BP, Mobil and Holiday diesel stations locally. I always used Shell in my Hemi thinking it was a better grade of gas. What are your thoughts?
 

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BP Diesel SUCKS big time.

They advertise as a premium diesel, with a bunch of additives mixed in to help lube the pump. But, I've always lost 2~3 mpg on my Cummins. Glassmar works the best. But, I never had issues with anything other than BP.
 

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This is a great thread!! Here in canada shell sells a regular and premium deisel... all I want is best milage, so let's hear it from you guys who have shit tons of diesel experience....
 

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I have only known one type of diesel and that is diesel, never heard of a premium or regular. I have always filled up at truck stops ( QT, Loves, etc. etc ) due to the fact that they go through a lot of it. If diesel sits in a tank too long algae can form in the fuel. No mom and pop stations for me.
 

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I have only known one type of diesel and that is diesel, never heard of a premium or regular. I have always filled up at truck stops ( QT, Loves, etc. etc ) due to the fact that they go through a lot of it. If diesel sits in a tank too long algae can form in the fuel. No mom and pop stations for me.
Then you haven't looked around much. (lol)

In the USA... the concept of "Premium" diesel is really a misnomer. It's truly just a label that BP has slapped on the description of their fuel. In every other country (since the rest of the world actually likes diesel in the public sector)... they have a true regular/premium diesel. Just like we have regular/mid/premium gas. (in most places)

The reason it's not a true rating is... in the USA... we don't have a set standard for the cetane rating of Diesel.

In the USA... we have diesel #2, and Diesel #1. At the pump... you will generally only find Diesel #2. It has a lower Cetane number, and has more BTU's/gal. In turn... you get better MPG's. BUT... it takes a little more heat to get it to light off... and it has more paraffin in it. Because of that... it's harder to start, and will run rough in the winter... and it can gel up easer.

Diesel #1 is lighter, and carries less BTU's. It's less likely to gel, starts well... and runs smooth, with more "Umph". The down side is the loss of mileage.

In the winter, the fuel companies will blend #1 and #2 to help fight gel issues, and ease starts on cold mornings.

FYI... #2 is in the 50 Cetane range.... and #1 is in the 55~65 range.


If public Diesel catches on in the USA... I'm sure we will start to see the split again. (back in the 70's, you could get #1 or #2 at some stations)


A final FYI... Mixing Kerosene, Jet-A, JP4 or JP8 will also help with winter fuel issues.


If you have an older truck, and think you have an algae issue.... go buy 10 gal of Bio-Diesel, and 3 or 4 new fuel filters. The Bio will kill the algae, and clean the tank. The filters are just to catch all the junk that will come out after.
 
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This is a great thread!! Here in canada shell sells a regular and premium deisel... all I want is best milage, so let's hear it from you guys who have shit tons of diesel experience....
Best MPG's will come from "Standard"... but best power will come from "Premium"
 

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Perfect thanks....this. thread reminds me a few years back, things were pretty lax at our airport fuelling and the workers for years had been stealing selling on the side jet fuel for people who had diesel trucks, I remember thinking wow I didn't know you could run that stuff in trucks..... this was maybe 8-9 years ago now, someone caught on and ratted them out lol
 

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Perfect thanks....this. thread reminds me a few years back, things were pretty lax at our airport fuelling and the workers for years had been stealing selling on the side jet fuel for people who had diesel trucks, I remember thinking wow I didn't know you could run that stuff in trucks..... this was maybe 8-9 years ago now, someone caught on and ratted them out lol
Well.......


If you know anyone who works on aircraft... they normally will have to de-fuel jets to work on them. OR... they may have to take samples to check for contamination. The fuel drained CAN NOT be put back into the aircraft, and the repair shops normally have to pay to dispose of the fuel. I've worked out a deal with a buddy... and I can help "Dispose" of the fuel. The official use is for heating oil, and/or running model jet engines. I'm not allowed to burn in in my truck, because of one simple fact.... There is no road use TAX paid on the fuel. But, there has been a few times where the barrel leaked, and some how went right into my tank. (LoL)

But honestly.... our model jets burn a butt load of fuel. One of my engines carry almost a gallon of fuel, and that equates to about a 6 min flight. (and it's not even a big engine) If I take 20 gal to a jet rally, and give out some free fuel... the guys can burn that in about an hour. Some of the engines are rated for Diesel... but it's actually a dirty fuel, and it can cause issues with the bearings, and fuel needles.





 
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Dr Honda, congrats on getting the truck status, hopefully you will be driving soon. Also I appreciate the info on diesel differences.

Question on the #2-D gelling propensity, do any of the after-market fuel treatments help and, if so, is that year round or just in the winter ?
 

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I wish the newer diesels would run on 100% bio diesel. My 00 Cummins ran great on processed Canola oil which is supposed to be the best oil to run. Cotton seed, sunflower and peanut oil were good too so was chicken and pig fat. Cotton seed oil was darker and thicker than the others which required a healthy lift pump to get it from the tank to the engine. All the bio I ran was processed in a process called transesterification which removes most of the parrafins that will clog filters and get gooey in cooler weather. I ran that truck every summer on 100% bio and a 50/50 bio/ diesel mix in winter and never had an issue, the exhaust smelled good too.
 

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Truck is rated for B20. Anyone know of any issues running B20?


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They down rate the oil change intervals (OCI) from 10k to 7,500 if using anything over B5 or B10 can't remember which. Other than that the DPF doesn't like bio but the injectors do since bio has more lubing properties than ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD)
 

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They down rate the oil change intervals (OCI) from 10k to 7,500 if using anything over B5 or B10 can't remember which. Other than that the DPF doesn't like bio but the injectors do since bio has more lubing properties than ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD)
Does it improve or decrease mpg? Power? Emissions?


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Decreases MPG because bio contains less energy per uint than #2 diesel but it's also cheaper 20-40 cents cheaper depending where you are for B100 vs pump diesel which still contains B5-10 most places. Power stays about the same but just uses more fuel as stated although some say they notice the difference.

Over all there are less emissions like CO2, nitrogen, etc but it has an oily residue type stuff, not sure how to explain it, that the DPFs don't like. I've read some stuff that says use of B100 across the board and if the exhaust systems and cats were designed for it than things like DPF and DEF wouldn't be need to meet current emission standards we have for Dino diesel

Overall it's a cleaner fuel that when used in higher concentrations B50+ is known to clean out fuel systems. In high mileage engines that have never seen B100 it's been known, but not scientifically proven per say,to clog up fuel filters with all the crap it gets out of the fuel system. Which is why it's recommended in high mileage applications slowly increase from B20ish up per tank and keep an eye on fuel filters.

Not sure if B20 would have this same effect at that concentration but for sure you'd have no problems on a new motor.
 

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Hi, some good posts here. Especially for the winter blends, which you will want in the winter in the UP.

IMHO, The best advice I can offer for your diesel purchases, is to always purchase from a high volume station. Truck stops are your best choice. Large fuel stations, that you see diesels fuelling at often. And ask about the winter bends, or run a winter anti gelling additive - always, if you do not know.

Large, established Trucks stops, are generally the safest places to get good diesel fuel.


As for the others suggesting JetA and JetA1, yes it will run it, and I have run equipment on it for 30 years, but be very careful! It does not have any lubricating qualities. Long story short, with out a long technical discussion!, I wouldn't recommend it in newer diesels in today's trucks. I run a large amount of ATF for lubrication, and marvel mystery oil, in the heavy engines (Detroit, Cummins, IH, etc etc) it will ruin your pumps and injectors very quickly. Hope this helps. (Ps I run it because I have access to it better than I do diesel for all of our heavy equipment, it is cheaper for me because of that, and all off road operations - I don't run it in my pick up trucks)
 

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Jeff...

Without a doubt, JP and Kero are "dry" fuels, and lack lube. Anyone playing with those fuels need to run a lubricant in the fuel. (Powerservce, Biodiesel, TC-w3 2-stroke, etc) DO NOT USE ANY LUBE WITH METAL SALTS OF ANY KIND !!!! They will plug/destroy the DPF.
 
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