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I have a 2003 C5 Corvette that I seldom use. It's a summer toy, and can sit for one or two years on occasion. Many modern gas engines will crank and not fire when the accelerator pedal is on the floor. I do this and watch the oil pressure build up on the gauge before I start it. When I was a kid, well over 50 years ago, an old WWII mechanic told me they used to pull the coil wire and crank to build oil pressure when it was extremely cold. He said it reduced the number of engine re-builds required.
 

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A few people in Canada use the Webasto or Espar coolant circulation heaters with either the remote start or programmable feature. They require a tune modification to the ECU to disable a temperature trouble code. GDE does this. Many CTD owner use these heaters as well.
 

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well I guess I'm with the so called minority again;
I like block heaters, oil heater, transmission heaters and I would like a pre/post lube system for all my engines.
So far I have only had them in two and that was many years ago.
 

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I don't know why they don't put a circulating heater in the system right from the factory.
needs to be much larger and wastes a lot of electricity when not really necessary. It doesn't seem to me the current heater causes any problems.
 

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I wasn’t trying to offend...sorry you took it that way.
I think you’re only seeing one side of a two sided coin. Additionally, unless my google-foo is failing, no one makes a pre-oiler for this motor. Since you seem to be saying I’m wrong, perhaps you could point me to a prelube pump?
I surely wasn't offended, I have very thick skin. I was just amazed at how you knew what I have read in my lifetime. ;)

The pump doesn't have to be specific to the engine. I don't know if anyone has a pre-engineered kit for our engines or not...I suspect not. There are numerous prelube pumps available, I found three when I was writing my initial response to you, but it is up to the purchaser to pick the volume and type for their vehicle and then find the appropriate locations to connect it into the system. To do that takes some knowledge of the oil circulation system for the engine and where to connect the supply to do the most good. Search using this phrase-'engine oil prelube pumps' and you will find several. Perhaps one of the pump suppliers can help with the details.

In the past I have seen an accumulator system as well where when running the engine pumps up the accumulator with oil and when shut off an electric solenoid valve is closed storing the pressurized oil and the starting sequence then requires triggering the solenoid valve on the accumulator to begin releasing the pressurized oil into the lube system and beginning turning the engine over to start 5 or so seconds after the valve is opened. My recollection is they stored one to 2 qts of oil depending upon size of the engine. I haven't searched for or seen this type in use for many years.

I would like to understand what the other side of the two sided coin says though.

All the best,
 

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Now that temps have turned cold in my area, I've been experimenting with my block heater, and I'm finding I'm disappointed with it's effectiveness. As some background, I have a pilot's license and my own plane, and engine preheating is IMPERATIVE on aircraft engines at temps less than freezing.

It would be be handy to know where you operate and in what sort of extremes that would make you think you need more/better heating? I am at N48.5, W80.5 and for the two winters that I ran my ED I had zero issues with it starting, and I've seen the alcolhol disappear in the thermometer ..... and it started fine with the block heater that is standard on the truck. Adding heat won't hurt, but when a .22 SHP puts the groundhog down .... why buy a howitzer?

??

PS .... I've been a private licensed pilot with a night rating since the mid '90's, and I think the ED has enough block heater to do what it's supposed to.
 

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'18 Laramie CC 4x4, '03 Ram 3500 Laramie Sport QC 4x4 Cummins Smarty, built 47 series trans
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I've lived in AK over 40 years, owner of '18 EcoDiesel and '03 Ram w/Cummins. I run block heater, pan heater and battery heater blankets on my '03 and have always used that combo on my previous Cummins trucks,prefer the engines to fire up like they do in warm weather. This is the first winter with my EcoDiesel and not impressed with the block heater, do have it set on timer 4 hours prior to needing the truck. I haven't decided to add second higher wattage block heater
(if possible) or going with a pan heater. We had couple days with
-13 below zero and wished for the pan heater to have the heater blowing warm air faster. I let it idle 8-10 minutes to melt the ice on windshield. With my Cummins heater combo, the ice melts off the windshield about same amount of time. If I don't use the oil pan heater, makes a noticeable difference in the warm-up times. My first Ram Cummins was still running strong with over 1 million miles, your guess is good as mine if the heater combos helped the cold start wear & tear.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
I've lived in AK over 40 years, owner of '18 EcoDiesel and '03 Ram w/Cummins. I run block heater, pan heater and battery heater blankets on my '03 and have always used that combo on my previous Cummins trucks,prefer the engines to fire up like they do in warm weather. This is the first winter with my EcoDiesel and not impressed with the block heater, do have it set on timer 4 hours prior to needing the truck. I haven't decided to add second higher wattage block heater
(if possible) or going with a pan heater. We had couple days with
-13 below zero and wished for the pan heater to have the heater blowing warm air faster. I let it idle 8-10 minutes to melt the ice on windshield. With my Cummins heater combo, the ice melts off the windshield about same amount of time. If I don't use the oil pan heater, makes a noticeable difference in the warm-up times. My first Ram Cummins was still running strong with over 1 million miles, your guess is good as mine if the heater combos helped the cold start wear & tear.
I've noticed the EcoDiesel is a very cold blooded engine. Yesterday, we had seasonably warm temps here (about 50F, which is 20 degrees over normal) and even then, I think it took my not-plugged-in Ecodiesel about 20 minutes of idling in the driveway before it was putting out warm air with the heater. My Ford SUV warms up the interior after only 5 minutes in similar temps.
 

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Discussion Starter #34 (Edited)
Update to an old thread:

I ended up installing a thermostated Keenovo 250 watt oil pan heater, run to a 2-to-1 plug junction with the block heater, then to my NOCO plug in the front bumper. So the total going to the engine is now about 675+- watts. I also recently added a winter grill cover. All I can now say is, "Wow! What a difference!" This morning it was the coldest day since I've had my truck: -12F at my house, but the truck was plugged in overnight. On start up, the engine showed 120 degree engine coolant (about normal for plugged in) but also now 114 degree oil temp (instead of my normal reading of "about equal to ambient temp"). Of note, after the AEM, my truck has throttle lag when warming up. Whenever engine coolant/oil temps are below about 150 degrees, I have throttle lag, but once above that, it goes away. I live down about 5 miles of country road from a highway, and normally on a cold morning, I'm still a little below 150 degrees when I reach the highway even after having the block heater plugged in, making pulling out into traffic a challenge. Not this oh-so-cold morning! I was at 160 and it pulled out without throttle lag! (It actually caught me off guard, lol.) Success!

Anyone else thinking of doing this: the only company I found making an oil pan heater narrow enough to fit on the weird-shaped Ecodiesel oil pan was Keenovo. You have to call them and "custom order" the heater, which isn't as big a deal as it sounds. Just make sure the heater you get is no wider than 2", or longer than 11". They could have made one 300 watts, but at that output the size was "pushing it" width-wise, so I went with 250 watts instead. But, 250 watts seems to do the job anyway. I also had one made with a thermostat, even though it costs more. I went with the thermostat because I'll plug in nearly all fall/winter/spring, and I didn't want things getting too hot. The thermostat shuts it off at 180 degrees.
 

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It's nice that you are getting decent heating for your Ecod. I have often thought that heating the oil along with heating the antifreeze would make sense, but I have yet to see it get cold enough that we "needed" to do that.

This morning was -34C (-29F), and we've had a warm easy winter ....

My Ecod is parked this winter, but the two winters that I drove it were colder than this one and it had no issues at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
@ timmytime : did you get the new V07 AEM version , it does not show as a recall on thre Mopar site ,
it is suppose to take care of the '' lag when cold '' , :giggle:
.....
see what Muddrow2 posted in post # 55 in here :
Sounds like a V08 update is in the works...
No, not yet. I scheduled with my dealer the repair for the VB1 recall, and as soon as the part is available, they'll call me. When getting that update, I'll get the V07 done (not sure if it will matter though, as I'm also planning, ahem, something else with the ECM just after that).
 

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You will love the ahem solution .......nice to have stock tune for the VB1 visit ,
and after I get the VB1 recall done with the ''already discribed new beefier EGR '' (( looking identical from outside )),
I'm putting back the ahem in , best of both worlds .
the EGR even with new design was said NOT to be the only thing responsable for
engine fires , the ahem takes care of the other reasons for fires .
......
all this based on post # 67 in that thread :
Ecodiesel Fire
 

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I know my block heater works, I can hear it make a "sizzling" noise when plugged in.

But I agree it is a weak beast. My 2017 never shows any extra heat at startup due to the engine temp gauge bottoms at 100 F. But the transmission temp sensor does go low, and after it is started, will show some small amount of heat above ambient, not much, but some, maybe an extra 10-15 F degrees above ambient.

But small as it is, it makes a world of difference on the engine noise. Yesterday, it wasn't too cold, in the mid 20,s F, and I was plowing the drive. I cold started my truck, backed up 50 feet, and turned it off.

Man does that engine make ugly sounds when cold and in drive/reverse. I don't hear those sounds when I use the block heater.

IF I was any closer to the interior of Alaska (Wasilla), I would have the oil pan and battery heater also. -40 is not kind to anything living or not.
 

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At -9 F , plugging the block heater in for only one hour gave me an indicated coolant temp of 60F. Started quickly with minimal diesel clatter. Seems to make a big difference to me, and I really don't think you need to plug it in longer unless it gets a lot colder, like -25 or so. I use the winter front when ever it's 40F or colder, but if I'm towing, take it off. I do believe the winter front and the block heater save some fuel as well.
 
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