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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was towing an empty tandem axle 16’ flatbed trailer this past weekend and experienced a blowout about halfway through the 1400 mile trip. The blowout occurred on the rear axle and I did have the hitch set a little higher than I normally tow with (had it set for my boat trailer, not the flatbed) and the guy who replaced the tire speculated that having it higher may have led to higher temps on the rear tires which led to the blowout. So with that in mind I dropped the hitch down until it was level (which was all the way down on my adjustable bracket) but now it seems way less smooth than it did before. I can feel every little bump in the road and sometimes it even feels like the trailer is trying to push the truck. So I guess my two questions are 1 - is it plausible that having the trailer nose high caused the blowout, and 2 - is it too low now and that’s the cause for the rougher ride. The “before” pic is from a bad angle but it’s the only one I had from before I adjusted the hitch. The after is from how it’s sitting now with the load (about 2,500 lbs) on it. Thanks in advance for any help.

Before:

A340A859-4F1C-4E26-A173-B77980FC572B.jpeg


After:

A5EA465A-4ED8-4857-898F-3E3D87AF6BE8.jpeg
 

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Slightly nose down, just below level, is usually best and depending on the suspension style it can effect axle loading. But I cant see that causing a blow out unless the tire is wrong load range or the trailer is overloaded.
 

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If those are regular leaf spring axles with the center pivot, it would really have to be very nose high for the rear tire to take that much more weight. They are made to float going over bumps and through potholes. Now if they were separate torsion axles it might be a different story. I'm going with Brokendown's comment too.
 

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2015 Outdoorsman EcoD CC w/6.4' 4X4
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I'll third what they said^^^
Doubt the nose high caused the rear tire blow out even with that little of a load. I'd say bad tire or road hazard would be more suspect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the replies. Yes, it is a leaf spring setup with an equalizer. The tires were all new a few years ago with maybe a few thousand miles on them, it’s stored outside but under cover and up on those plastic RV leveling blocks to help prolong the tire life. Like you all think I’m guessing it was just a bum tire or some sort of road hazard. It was mighty convenient that the next exit had a tire guy right at the off ramp… :)
 

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To me a trailer tire is a disaster coming at you all the time. You say that tire was a "couple years old". Well I have never been able to get more than a "couple years" out of my toy hauler tires without blowouts. Sometimes they have less than a few thousand miles on them. Rarely more. The tires sit and flat out rot from no use.

Just look along the roadways of America. Campers, RV's., boats, semi's, utility trailer tires blown everywhere. Trailer tires are a joke. If you pull a trailer, expect trouble and you will meet your expectations shortly.
 
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