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I'm looking at a Rockwood Roo 235S
Rockwood Roo 235S | Forest River RV - Manufacturer of Travel Trailers - Fifth Wheels - Tent Campers - Motorhomes

Hitch weight 725, total weight 6885

I've got a 4x4 3.55 CC 5'7 box. Ram says 1320 payload and 7580 max tow

So me, wife, kids and dogs and crap in the cab 600# plus 725 hitch weight puts me right at max payload.

Assuming I get D or E rated tires a good WDH and I don't drive it like I stole it.

Can I pull it?
easily... Set the hitch up correctly. If you are not sure ask someone who knows.. Not something to guess at.

Mark
 

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Yep. Get a good WDH that has sway control. Load the camper accordingly to be mindful of tongue weight.

You don't need D or E rated tires. D or E are heavy and will kill your mileage and ride. I run Michelin Defender M/S which have a higher load rating than the stock tires without all the added weight of a D or E tire.
 

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Yep. I’ve towed it but dry. I used the Andersen WDH with built in sway control and despite the flat box front it pulled straight with no sway at 65 mph. Fuel economy won’t be remarkable due to the aerodynamics but my truck would easily average 14 mpg hwy at that speed. Fuel economy would drop sharply above that. Honestly it was light enough I didn’t even bother rolling over a CAT scale to set it up right. But I would advise that for a fully loaded trailer with family etc.

If you have to store heavy stuff in your bed you additionally would benefit from some rear spring support from one of the many ways of going about that. Axle to frame air bags, in coil bags, polyurethane foam springs, timbren bump stops, aftermarket springs. All with some pros & cons. I’m spoiled I would “spring” for the Timber groves. All that said it would not be a requirement with enough weight transfer from your WDH.

https://timbergroveenterprises.com/
 

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Agree with the others. You can tow it if you set it up right. Take your time building speed and keep your distance. You know the drill. Don't drive others on the road like they drive you.
 

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On our travels I often saw rigs set up with way too small of spring bars. One guy I passed this spring, his spring bars were so tight, they were curled at the ends. I surmised they were using the "dry" tongue weight.

Take that tongue dry weight, add a battery, or two, propane, a WDH, and not even counting what's in the back box (It counts too!) you;re pushing a 1000 lbs before you know it.

We have a small, total length is 21 feet, rv tt. But all loaded up for our trip, truck, people, pets, etc, total weight was 13,200 lbs. And the Eco all pulled it nicely, my point being is to be aware of the "balancing act" that goes on pulling trailers. If you have air bags, turn them off until you got the bars set right. If your rear tires, or inversely, your spring bars are wearing hard, you have an issue. My rears were wearing hard on our 14,500 mile trip. Replacing the worn out WDH took care of that, but not before wearing half the rubber off the drivers. Since the new Curt WDH, all is well again. I didn't even blink at using 1000-1400 lb bars. Now it tows and rides super, and quiet.

I used to pull the same trailer, with a 1994 GMC C1500, with a Yamaha Grizzly quad in the box. I had coil overloads on the shocks, and 1000 lb bars, and drove it to Mexico and back, twice. It all rode well with just me and the cat. But I was right to the nibs.

Watch the weight, it adds up fast.

Califoria 014.jpg
 

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Yep. Get a good WDH that has sway control. Load the camper accordingly to be mindful of tongue weight.

You don't need D or E rated tires. D or E are heavy and will kill your mileage and ride. I run Michelin Defender M/S which have a higher load rating than the stock tires without all the added weight of a D or E tire.
I ran Cooper LTs, e rated and twice the weight as the SRA's, and expected to see a hit on mileage.

I was pleasantly surprised to not see any negative effects on mileage. I still get 14-15 mpg towing the same rig, same setup as with the stock OEM tires.
 

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That trailer is 5400 lbs "dry". Now you can add your propane fills, water ( could be 500 lbs or more) and all your food, clothes, gear etc. All that is where you must be coming up with that 6,800 lb weight. Now if that were the "dry" weight, I would say NO. You should figure your truck can tow tops something like 7,500 lbs with your 3"55 rear-end ratio.

I would not want to tow that much with my Ecodiesel, at least not very far or hard. Many do and you may be comfortable doing it. Many tow heavier and longer and do not report issues.
 

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I'm sure that you'll be fine. I'd keep an eye on oil, coolant and transmission temps. There are aftermarket improvements for cooling and depending on your grille, you may want to swap for one that cools better.
 

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I had a very similar trailer, a Rockwood 2604 WS. My main caution is the tongue weight was a lot higher than the brochure said. I think mine was almost 900pounds. Couple that with the low payload of the ED (my Laramie door sticker said 1200 pounds) and you need to be careful about loading the front storage on the trailer and piling stuff in the truck. I highly recommend Timbergrove air bags. Adjust your WD hitch per the manufacturers instructions first, then put just enough air in the bags to lift the back of the truck less than one inch. My theory is this is like adding stiffer springs in the back to help reduce porpoising and bottoming out. The truck had no trouble towing 6,300 pounds through the Adirondacks. One other recommendation; after you adjust your hitch, go to a CAT scale and get your weights checked. In my case moving only about 100 pounds more to the front axle made a big difference in the stability of the rig.
 

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I'm sure that you'll be fine. I'd keep an eye on oil, coolant and transmission temps. There are aftermarket improvements for cooling and depending on your grille, you may want to swap for one that cools better.
I've got a 2017 Laramie, so the the chrome grill with the holes in it. Looks like it should flow well, is there one that's supposed to flow the most. If I did need extra cooling what are most people using oil and trans coolers?? Swapping radiators??
 

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I've got a 2017 Laramie, so the the chrome grill with the holes in it. Looks like it should flow well, is there one that's supposed to flow the most. If I did need extra cooling what are most people using oil and trans coolers?? Swapping radiators??
I swapped my Laramie grille for the Laramie Longhorn grille.
 

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I have a flagstaff micro-lite 25BDRS(Rockwood 2509s) and in comes in at about 5100lbs dry (average 5500-5700 loaded) I've towed with it on 5 trips and my Eco diesel pulls it with ease. Just make sure get a good hitch and you'll be fine.
 

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Well I just looked at the sticker in the door jamb. Says payload 1092!?! I was going off the tow chart from Ram for the 1320#. Assuming I setup wdh correct, should the 300# difference cause worry. We were planning on going to get or order the trailer this weekend.
 

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I idon't have the numbers in front of me but in a thread here somewhere Vern mentioned that a comparable Hemi 1500 has payload ratings quite a bit higher than the EcoD - and of course it's the same frame, brakes, etc. The reductions for the EcoD are primarily due to the cooling system for the engine, especially the oil. An aftermarket oil cooler like Bounty Hunter has installed takes care of the oil temps which may also reduce coolant temp since there is a reduction in heat transfer from oil to coolant through the stock oil cooler.

All that to say that the capacity of our 1500 ED's is reduced not because the truck itself can't handle the loads but because FCA is quite conservative with the payload and tow ratings thanks to the ED's cooling system design. Don't go crazy with payload or tow weight but recognize that being mindful of your coolant and oil temps will enable you to push the boundaries a bit on your GVWR. Again, be careful and smart about how you load your rig and you'll be fine.

Bob
 

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You might peruse some old threads for examples. Payload more accurately availabile gvwr (6950) is a secondary consideration to axle weights and tongue weigh with respects to safety & stability. You would not be able to feel the difference between being a couple hundred pounds over or under gvwr. Just get your weight distribution IE axle and tongue weights right. The CAT (triple) scales is your friend and can quickly & concretely help you adjust your WDH and loading towards accomplishing this.

You want to A replace your unloaded steer weight which should be around 32/3300. B adjust towards 12 percent TW (tongue weight) often broadly stated to be within 10 to 15 percent of gross trailer weight.

When using a WDH you find TW by subtracting the unloaded TV (tow vehicle) weight from the loaded TV weight seen in your weight slip printouts.

Say your wet trailer is 6,800 12 percent equals 800. So if truck weighed 6k unloaded it would be 6,800 loaded. Trailer axle weight would be seen as 6k since it transferred 800 pounds to the truck.
 
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