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https://time.com/5679741/epa-california-regulate-pollution-trump/

Heard on the radio this morning that the EPA now controls emissions standards across the country. According to the radio news and this one article I found CARB is no longer allowed to create emissions regulations tougher than what comes out of the EPA. Think there are 13 states following California emissions standards right now. It has been a joke but looks like the joke is over.

Not sure if they now have to "roll back" their onerous regulations. No clue how that affects tuning sales, tuning regulations and California testing. Common sense is getting interesting.
 

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Best news all year -Trump is my hero!
 

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https://time.com/5679741/epa-california-regulate-pollution-trump/

Heard on the radio this morning that the EPA now controls emissions standards across the country. According to the radio news and this one article I found CARB is no longer allowed to create emissions regulations tougher than what comes out of the EPA. Think there are 13 states following California emissions standards right now. It has been a joke but looks like the joke is over.

Not sure if they now have to "roll back" their onerous regulations. No clue how that affects tuning sales, tuning regulations and California testing. Common sense is getting interesting.
It should have zero effect on emissions and tuning rules.

my understanding is they are revoking a waiver on fuel economy rules - which knowing cali - is probably some insane and unreasonable level.
 

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Since most new cars already meet the current CARB regulations, it would make the most sense to just put a stop to any future CARB changes.
 

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Of course the Ninth Circuit Court will rule the move unconstitutional and the Supreme Court will give them another black eye and rule in favor for the United States.

A businessman will always weigh practicality against the bottom line. The restrictions that CARB places on manufacturing does almost zero to offset carbon and only accomplishes higher prices for the consumer.

Electric vehicles would be great, but the cost, range, and charge time are all outrageous. Battery powered electric vehicles are very impractical; however, create your electricity with hydrogen fuel cells and you eliminate all the disadvantages of electric vehicles. Hydrogen fuel cells will be the path to carbon free emission vehicles. The problem with hydrogen is the production cost. A gasoline gallon equivalent cost about $5.00. As long as fossil fuels are abundant and cheap, hydrogen will not be accepted by the consumer. So, the trick is to utilize methods of hydrogen production that lowers hydrogen to the gasoline equivalent cost. Currently, nuclear energy is the only viable method that can produce hydrogen at a gasoline equivalent cost.
 

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Well, not sure how the supreme court will rule. There is a question in the clean air act in the sense that, it gives the feds the right to grant waivers, but does not specifically give them the right to revoke them. One might argue that power is implied, but SCOTUS may very well rule that if you want to change it, you need some legislation.

No chance of that happening w/ the enviro-nuts in the house.
 

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Of course the Ninth Circuit Court will rule the move unconstitutional and the Supreme Court will give them another black eye and rule in favor for the United States.

A businessman will always weigh practicality against the bottom line. The restrictions that CARB places on manufacturing does almost zero to offset carbon and only accomplishes higher prices for the consumer.

Electric vehicles would be great, but the cost, range, and charge time are all outrageous. Battery powered electric vehicles are very impractical; however, create your electricity with hydrogen fuel cells and you eliminate all the disadvantages of electric vehicles. Hydrogen fuel cells will be the path to carbon free emission vehicles. The problem with hydrogen is the production cost. A gasoline gallon equivalent cost about $5.00. As long as fossil fuels are abundant and cheap, hydrogen will not be accepted by the consumer. So, the trick is to utilize methods of hydrogen production that lowers hydrogen to the gasoline equivalent cost. Currently, nuclear energy is the only viable method that can produce hydrogen at a gasoline equivalent cost.
the other problems with hydrogen are the cost to transport and store it and the ability to carry a sufficent amount for a decent range on a typical passenger car.. It will be decades beffore a nationwide network of hydrogen refill stations exists across the country.
 

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So sick of winning all the time... :D
 

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You really think the auto manufacturers are going to redesign and retool to accommodate a change in standards that could be reversed with an upcoming election?
 

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I'm 100% hoping this means GDE will sell me a tune, now!!!

Won't matter too much longer anyway... I'm leaving this ****tard state next year.
 

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So the EPA put on their big boy pants and are no longer allowing the tail to wag the dog eh?

For the last couple decades if you wanted to see what was coming down the EPA pipeline all you had to do was look towards California.

OK so great they recognized how retarded CARB has gone...full retard. I don't see this reversing anything going forward, but merely putting a halt to the rediculously increasing standards at increasing rates.

If the EPA roles back it's requirements it's going to be on an industrial scale (reintroduce clean coal burning power plants... Even though restart costs would be prohibitive, it's just an example).

Your diesel trucks are still going to be ladened with the BS they have now. The hope is though the EPA can have some sense and allow development of "improved emissions" that do in fact not require an EGR (cummins) rather than saying "the equipment is there, and will be regardless" (a la CARB).

Possible fallout is they scale back their stance on offroad products, but with their recent actions that seems unlikely. Not that government agencies don't flop 180 on issues all the time.


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In my opinion. CARB has been reaching beyond there state.
I heard on the news, other states have somehow been adopting there guidelines,
Should the other states need a federal EPA waiver to adopt CARB
If you move to a state that has adopted CARB, would you legally be required to modify your car to comply.
would be nice for EPA to at least clear up some of there questions
 

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^^^^^ In my opinion. CARB has been reaching beyond there state.

I heard on the news, other states have somehow been adopting there guidelines,
There are 13 other states using CARB rules

Should the other states need a federal EPA waiver to adopt CARB
IMO no. States can use whatever they want as long as it complies with Federal rules

If you move to a state that has adopted CARB, would you legally be required to modify your car to comply.
Yes, if you re-register in that state. None of this changes current registration and emission compliance rules

would be nice for EPA to at least clear up some of there questions
 

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^^^^^ In my opinion. CARB has been reaching beyond there state.

I heard on the news, other states have somehow been adopting there guidelines,
There are 13 other states using CARB rules

Should the other states need a federal EPA waiver to adopt CARB
IMO no. States can use whatever they want as long as it complies with Federal rules

If you move to a state that has adopted CARB, would you legally be required to modify your car to comply.
Yes, if you re-register in that state. None of this changes current registration and emission compliance rules

would be nice for EPA to at least clear up some of there questions
I'll add to your second point. No state can pass regulations/restrictions that are looser than the EPA regulations. That's the point that CARB has been operating under. They can be more restrictive. Other states have followed those rules simply because they do not have to reinvent the wheel. I work in the paint industry and although South Coast (LA Basin) is the most restrictive by a factor of 3-5x in some cases, the industry is using the South Coast regulations because it's easier to produce a product that can be sold and shipped nationwide.
 

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I'll add to your second point. No state can pass regulations/restrictions that are looser than the EPA regulations. That's the point that CARB has been operating under. They can be more restrictive. Other states have followed those rules simply because they do not have to reinvent the wheel. I work in the paint industry and although South Coast (LA Basin) is the most restrictive by a factor of 3-5x in some cases, the industry is using the South Coast regulations because it's easier to produce a product that can be sold and shipped nationwide.
The new rule just signed by the Pres says the states can no longer be more restrictive than EPA. That should curb CARB's power a bit.
 
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