RAM 1500 Diesel Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So my recently new-to-me Laramie has a tire with a slow leak since I drove it off the lot 5k miles ago. Losing about 1/2 psi in a day, no help from the dealer. Not like I would go back there anyway.

Tires are Michelin Defender LTX M/S standard load rating, with about 40k mi on them--have the receipt from when the original owner ditched the SRAs less than 6 months into owning the truck.

Anyone have secrets/tricks for hunting down a slow bleed? Best I can think of is unmount and slather sealant on the bead area and cross my fingers. Would like to keep the tires for as long as possible, plenty of meat left on this long wearing tread, and I've seen elsewhere that they're decent performers (for an all season) in the heavy snows we get here. It's just a pain to keep airing one tire up every week or so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,302 Posts
I find the TPMS to be wildly inaccurate and change with the wind. How long does it take to leak down to too low to run? How low does it go?

Take the valve stem cover off and drip some soap water on the valve stem end to see if its leaking, look for bubbles.

Take the tire off and lay it on its side and cover the bead with soap water and look for bubbles. Flip over and repeat.

If still nothing go over the whole tread with soap water again looking for bubbles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
392 Posts
I find the TPMS to be wildly inaccurate and change with the wind. How long does it take to leak down to too low to run? How low does it go?

Take the valve stem cover off and drip some soap water on the valve stem end to see if its leaking, look for bubbles.

Take the tire off and lay it on its side and cover the bead with soap water and look for bubbles. Flip over and repeat.

If still nothing go over the whole tread with soap water again looking for bubbles.
This will find most leaks, I have seen and had tires with porous sidewalls.
My last slow leak was this summer on my RAM the valve core was leaking around the base,
had to get a new stem and tpms maintenance kit, it would loose 4-5 pounds in a weeks time.
I find my tpms to be quite accurate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,302 Posts
My TPMS don't agree at all with tire gauges. They sometimes have significant fluctuations from cold to hot and sometimes barely change at all. Sometimes the driver front will read 5 PSI over the passenger front and the next day it will be the opposite. My take they are good enough to tell you that you have a flat going down the HWY before your riding on the rim but that's about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the suggestions, I'll try the soapy water trick this weekend when I have time. Depending on miles and now the weather, it takes between 1 and 2 weeks to drop from full ~42psi hot to TPMS alarm (30psi cold in the early AM).

I have to agree that my TPMS seems very accurate, my hand guage aways seems within one psi of what the TPMS reports.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
My money is on the valve stem where it fits into the wheel. Bend it back and forth slightly a few times, should be fairly flexible. If thats it you'll probably hear some air leaking or just spray it with some soapy water like was mentioned earlier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,540 Posts
pointy little rocks can be impossible to see without the soapy water trick , a nail , a screw , seen them all ,
valve stem , even seen air come right thru my motorcycle aluminum wheel , it was welded to make it 2 inches wider
and welded aluminum can let air thru the metal depending on aluminum alloy fancy welding requirements.
once you see bubbles you'll know where to fix ,
next question will be ; a plug , or take tire off rim to put a patch from inside .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
744 Posts
Always a patch before a plug. Most times you have to make the hole bigger and sometime it cuts into the cords making the tire less safe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,597 Posts
The actual tire pressure monitors (TPM's) on mine developed a leak that somehow got out around the valve stem or through the valve core. I had two of them do that and it was not easy to find. Replaced all of mine with some aftermarket ones that were cheap and worked well. Of course it cost me to have all the tires taken off, down and the new TPM's replaced.

Just an idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
There are some pretty decent tire sealants out there these days. not sure how sensors will like it.
I saw a review on you tube (project farm or something like that)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Whoops, noticed I forgot to update this with my resolution. Turns out it was quite easy--3" framing nail buried square in the center tread valley. Perfect application for a patch, no signs of belt damage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
744 Posts
For future reference, TPMS's are metal stems and not flexible. There is a rubber seal where it come in contact with the inside of the rim. Also if you have to replace one, use the tire jack on the edge of the rim and use the weight of the truck to break the bead. Push the tire in and remove the valve and replace. To re-install the bead, remove the valve stem and hit with full pressure of compressed air and seal the bead in place. Re-install the valve stem and inflate to running cold pressure. FYI, the shape of the jack base is designed to fit around the edge of the rim. It was designed this way, way back to make it so one could change a tire when on the road away from any service centre. All it takes is your jack, 2 pry bars and a source for air and you can remove and install a tire where-ever you are. It is a knowledge base that has been forgotten over the years. I have actually done this a number of times. It is a handy skill for those that do back roads offroading.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,785 Posts
For future reference, TPMS's are metal stems and not flexible. There is a rubber seal where it come in contact with the inside of the rim. Also if you have to replace one, use the tire jack on the edge of the rim and use the weight of the truck to break the bead. Push the tire in and remove the valve and replace. To re-install the bead, remove the valve stem and hit with full pressure of compressed air and seal the bead in place. Re-install the valve stem and inflate to running cold pressure. FYI, the shape of the jack base is designed to fit around the edge of the rim. It was designed this way, way back to make it so one could change a tire when on the road away from any service centre. All it takes is your jack, 2 pry bars and a source for air and you can remove and install a tire where-ever you are. It is a knowledge base that has been forgotten over the years. I have actually done this a number of times. It is a handy skill for those that do back roads offroading.
I don't disagree with you but it is very difficult to do this with alloy wheels without damaging the wheel visually. It works fine on steel wheels but not so good on alloy wheels. Since the 30s or so Chrysler product wheels had an bulge on the rims to help prevent the tire from coming off the rim and flopping around when you had a blowout or flat tire. I am not sure if the new wheels have this but the old ones were very hard to break the bead compared to Ford or GM wheels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,540 Posts
..... It is a knowledge base that has been forgotten over the years.""""""" I have actually done this a number of times.""""""It is a handy skill for those that do back roads offroading.
Respect , that is rough job to do on the side of the road with small air pump to conclude the swap ..
I would not attempt this at my age anymore .
did the swap before , I have an old tool to break the Bead , don't see those
for sale much anymore .
84413
84414
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
744 Posts
Kaz, I don't have the clamping bar, but the pry bar you have I used this past summer to remove tire off of my aluminum rims from my Avenger. I also don't have the 2 specialty bars that you have. I too am getting older, 65 in a month and a half. Too cheap to pay someone for something I can do. Can't afford their rates on a pension. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,540 Posts
Tire spoons , Even Walmard has them ,
------------------------------
I made a " wheel station " between a couple of wall studs in the garage ,
lever principle with weak lever to break bead on motorcycle rims....
( not strong enough for working on our truck's wheels ):rolleyes:
84416
84417
84418
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top