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Hi all-
I just registered on the forum, and I am a newbie in the world of diesel. I currently have an '05 Ram 1500 w/HEMI. Love the engine, hate the fuel consumption (13/17). I'm lucky to get 11-12mpg when towing my 2500 lb boat/trailer. Towing is where I imagine I would really see the fuel savings rack-up! Needless to say, this new diesel intrigues me. However, I hear certain people warn about any diesel engine's short comings.

Such as:
1. "Diesels are terrible for short trips. It's the worst thing for a diesel!"
Is this really still a problem with diesels, or are these naysayers living in the past? I ask because my short commute to work is 5 miles each way (10 round trip).

2. Another problem I've heard is the "gelling" of diesel fuel in cold temperatures. Living in WI, the winters can be brutal. So what about it? Does diesel fuel still gel up in freezing
temperatures? Are there any special considerations required because of the climate? I figure it can't be all that bad since so many Canadians are running diesel.

3. I've also been told maintenance is more expensive. Like, diesel repairs are 2 or 3 times more expensive. True or false?

I'm trying to convince myself that this new 3.0L engine is the way to go. Thanks in advance!
 

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Smallmouth guy; a few considerations, mileage will definitely be better, if your primary towing is the boat, then no problem. On cold weather, I know Wisconsin is cold, but you see tractor trailers in that weather. Sure there are times such as we had the polar vortex last week, that sent 20 year record cold through the central US, that's hard on any motor, but the Ram glow plugs are tested to -24 F, and block heaters work well, so I don't expect cold would be an issue.
Maintenance, I would have to ask what specific maintenance you are referring? If you look at maintenance over the life of the vehicle, I would not know. I know for a fact some of the maintenance on this motor in particular will be best done at dealer because of location of turbo, and that will add some costs, however most maint will be fuel filter, oil and filter etc.
Overall, I would not base my decision on maintenance or perceived maintenance cost.

Go drive a Jeep at your local dealer with the diesel and 8 speed, it will be very similar to the truck in how the motor performs and shifts, understanding the truck will be set up a little differently in shift mapping, but it is the same motor and same transmission.

I read in the current issue of Truck Trend, Truck Trend states "the Fuel economy will be at least 8 mpg highway better than any current pick up', and the testing was done at the tire test center in Texas, The Laramie 4 x 4 with 3.92 gears Truck Trend got 26 mpg, in the 2 wheel drive with 3.55 gears Truck trend achieved 28 mpg.... pretty good numbers

A purchase is a personal decision, some good info and experience here on the forum, many of the guys have a lot of experience, the ultimate call will be yours, and would suggest you go drive the jeep.

I had 2, 3/4 ton diesel pick ups, Duramax and Cummins, and I'll likely buy a Ram 3.0 diesel
 

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Gelling is not a problem in places that experience cold temps. Winter diesel is less prone to gelling because they mix #1 diesel into the #2. The down side, it hurts fuel economy due to less BTUs per gallon.

As far as short trips, you won't get full fuel economy until the engine is warm. On my Jeep, before I put the new thermostat, I lost almost 5MPG because the engine was no where near operating temps. Then I get the Ram, I am still keeping the Jeep for my everyday vehicle, but will be putting a 195 degree thermostat in so I can get the most MPG as I can. For you, where the short trips hurt is the DPF. Read up on DPF engines, and this may convince you not to get one.

Maintaining any vehicle is expensive. Some places charge more for a diesel, probably because they can. I will avoid the stealership at all costs. I have a long time diesel mechanic that treats me right. With this truck, due to the DPF, I would probably have an Engine Oil Analysis done to figure out how to get the most of the oil. Problem with DPF is that it injects extra fuel into the exhaust stroke to burn off the soot in the filter when it is in Regen Mode. Some fuel has been known, especially in the 6.4L powerstrokes, to get by the rings and into the oil. There have been cases where you empty out quarts more of thin down oil than the engine is supposed to have. I did read in the owners manual, available online, that some oil in these could get by the rings. That is why I will be having EOAs done to see if and how much it is happening.
 

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Hi all-
I just registered on the forum, and I am a newbie in the world of diesel. ...
Welcome, I'm a diesel noob, too. The long-time truck owners here have valuable experience. And the internet is great for researching this new (to North America) engine. I have looked at automotive diesels with interest since around 1970 but always found them too obnoxious and polluting to tolerate. The Sprinter diesel was the first light truck motor that had some appeal, and the 3.0L diesel in the Grand Cherokee and Ram 1500 ticks off all the boxes for me: quiet, clean and sized right for the job. I would expect low 20s mpg when towing your boat, maybe a little less in the mountains.

This modern engine is designed for passenger cars and light trucks such as delivery vans and it should work fine for short trips and cold weather. The caveat is that you need to allow for occasional trips at highway speed for up to 20 minutes because of the way the particulate emissions system works. There is plenty of warning when this is required. You also have to fill a special diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) tank every so often.

I live in the snow zone so cold weather is a concern to me. Ram appears to have equipped the truck with adequate protection including heaters for the DEF and fuel filter. A block heater is recommended for cold starts below -10°F and required below -20°F.

From what I have read maintenance is more expensive but less frequent compared to a gas engine. In the end it is a wash for regular maintenance, and diesel durability can show significant gains over the long-term if you keep up on the routine maintenance.
 

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In the latest cold snap I had my duramax sitting outside for 10hrs in -15*F. Wind chill was -34. When I got in the truck I was running late and on the phone. I turned the key not stopping for the glow plugs. She didn't like it and cranked a little hard but she fired up. It kicked and bucked for a few seconds but ran fine. I almost never run any kind of additives.
As far as maintenance I think its a wash.
We will not be able to tell for a few years but resale on diesels are higher. So the $2850 up front will be made up in resale especially if you have over 100,000 miles. So to me even if your saving is not huge on fuel, you will still end up with a cooler, better towing truck for the years you have it.
 

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You really must look at your situation. If you drive 20km to work and mostly in the city and only tow 3 or 4 times a month this is probably not for you. I would love the diesel but for me it does not work. Mpg will be low 20s for 5 months in cold weather. Short drives equals bad fuel economy. Also diesel where I live is 14 cents a litre more. Almost 60 cents a gallon. I did a lot of research and the eco would cost me more to own. If I had a trailer on the back most of the time the eco would be for me. Most people don't need the eco but sometimes it's nice to just buy something you want. Most diesel owner just like diesels. They never use them to there true potentials.
 
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For me the big thing is the highway fuel economy, diesel here is usually 25-40 cents more a gallon than mid-grade. The few guys I've know with the 5.7 have all run mid-grade and said they could tell between mid and regular in their trucks. My commute is 45 miles each way at highway speeds so I think I could make back the difference back as I will most likely hold onto this truck 12-15 years. Currently have a 95 Suburban getting close to 200k the family has had from new, it's definitely ready for replacement and gets a GREAT 15 mpg highway on premium, knocks like crazy on even midgrade now.
 

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For me the big thing is the highway fuel economy, diesel here is usually 25-40 cents more a gallon than mid-grade. The few guys I've know with the 5.7 have all run mid-grade and said they could tell between mid and regular in their trucks. My commute is 45 miles each way at highway speeds so I think I could make back the difference back as I will most likely hold onto this truck 12-15 years. Currently have a 95 Suburban getting close to 200k the family has had from new, it's definitely ready for replacement and gets a GREAT 15 mpg highway on premium, knocks like crazy on even midgrade now.
Holding the truck that long changes the numbers for sure. I commute 1 hour 15 mins each way to work. I don't keep a vehicle for more then 5 years so numbers were not in my favour. When my 2014 ram is 5 years old I might look at the diesel again.
 
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I'm going by the local dealer tomorrow to check out a '12 Outdoorsman they have leftover. Don't want the older model without a steep discount, shorter bed and no RamBoxes but want to see what the Mossy Oak treatment in person. I don't use it as much for bulk hauling, can get my dad's superduty if I need to move the planet, and with the boxes it's still 4' wide. And I might be a little off for saying it, but it's almost too quiet in the videos I've seen on Youtube. Mock my sister for her 'off-road' exhaust on her V6 Mustang but this might need something to give it a better exhaust note down the line
 

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Hi all-
I just registered on the forum, and I am a newbie in the world of diesel. I currently have an '05 Ram 1500 w/HEMI. Love the engine, hate the fuel consumption (13/17). I'm lucky to get 11-12mpg when towing my 2500 lb boat/trailer. Towing is where I imagine I would really see the fuel savings rack-up! Needless to say, this new diesel intrigues me. However, I hear certain people warn about any diesel engine's short comings.

Such as:
1. "Diesels are terrible for short trips. It's the worst thing for a diesel!"
Is this really still a problem with diesels, or are these naysayers living in the past? I ask because my short commute to work is 5 miles each way (10 round trip).

2. Another problem I've heard is the "gelling" of diesel fuel in cold temperatures. Living in WI, the winters can be brutal. So what about it? Does diesel fuel still gel up in freezing
temperatures? Are there any special considerations required because of the climate? I figure it can't be all that bad since so many Canadians are running diesel.

3. I've also been told maintenance is more expensive. Like, diesel repairs are 2 or 3 times more expensive. True or false?

I'm trying to convince myself that this new 3.0L engine is the way to go. Thanks in advance!
Answers:

1. Yes. That is actually more true now with DPF on diesel engines. A current generation diesel engine is ill-suited for short commutes and stop and go urban driving.

2. No. Areas with cold weather are supplied with "winter-blend" diesel that should not gel. The problems usually occur when "summer fuel" is left in the tank going into winter, or a vehicle drives into cold country with summer-blend fuel. Additives like PowerService can also be added to eliminate gelling problems. The big issue with diesel in winter is that winter-blend diesel contains less energy per gallon than summer blend, so the fuel economy of the vehicle may be reduced--often by as much as 15% or more. Winter-blend diesel also often costs more per gallon than summer blend--a double whammy. Now, if temperatures drop REALLY low, say below -35° F. or lower, then gelling can be a problem, as can cold-weather starting. A diesel can be extremely difficult or nearly impossible to start at those frigid temperatures without a block heater.

3. Diesel engines typically cost more to repair, but generally need repairs much less often. Current model diesel engines also usually require more expensive synthetic motor oil and often have larger oil sumps than gasoline engines. That said, diesel engines when properly maintained will often way outlast a gas engine. That can "soften" the maintenance costs if one drives lots of miles and keeps a vehicle for a long time.
 
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