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Enjoying the hell out of this truck, just wanted to point out the break in recommendations. Manufacturer says no break in period is needed due to construction of this engine, as long as you follow simple guidelines.
Warm up engine.
No prolonged idle.
Use appropriate gear.
Watch oil press and temp.
Check coolant.
Vary throttle position under load.

The interesting part is "light duty operation such as light trailer towing or no load operation will extend the time before engine is at full efficiency"
Reduced fuel economy and power may be seen at this time.

Drive the crap out of it for the first 1000 miles to make it happy!!!
I'm already showing 26.2 mpg at only 200 miles, how good is it going to get??
 

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I've always broke in all my vehicles the same way be it a car, truck ,motorcycle or snow machine. Stop and go city driving to vary the RPM but don't baby it off the line but not to the floor for the first 200 then some highway again varring speed and load. After that drive it like you stole it this has worked for me for over 40 years!
 

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I've always broke in all my vehicles the same way be it a car, truck ,motorcycle or snow machine. Stop and go city driving to vary the RPM but don't baby it off the line but not to the floor for the first 200 then some highway again varring speed and load. After that drive it like you stole it this has worked for me for over 40 years!
Actually... that's not good for the engine.

I own a motorcycle shop... and when I do an engine for a customer... I take it out, put it in a high gear... and go WIDE OPEN THROTTLE !!!!! (up to about 70 mph) Then, follow it will a closed throttle de-cell. Then, make sure that everything is OK. After that... do it at least 3 times.

Basically, the high cyl pressure from WOT, and the heavy Vac from the deceleration, force the rings to seat faster. In turn... causing less oil burn later. AND... I want to know if there are any issues with my work. (Want it to explode on me, and not on the customer)

I do the same thing with boat and PWC engines.


With that said... an air cooled engine will run very hot until the rings fully seat, and the piston skirts polish. (But I think this engine has molly coated skirts)

That's my story, and I'm sticking to it.

FYI... your new truck has seen the same thing, as it's put on the dyno, at the end of the assembly line. (several full throttle runs)













 
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Doc is right again. Most rings are broke in and seated during cam break-in. Every engine I've built was wot and closed throttle decel pretty much right away. As Doc said, it is ready to go after a few cycles. If it's going to break, it would have done it by this time.
 

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One of my friends that owned a shipping company said he broke each truck in the same way. Personally, I go a-little easier but he didn't. As soon as the truck came in, he would max-out the load of the trailer for a long haul. He even said the longer the haul the better. He claimed that's the way his whole family did it. I just do not know but they did have millions of miles on those trucks. Of course, this could be apples and oranges here as well.

 

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The "Doctor" sure has some stuff. Knows his stuff too. Mostly agree.

Do think a little normal running is a good thing at first then run it hard. First few miles or an hour will beat down the rough spots on machine work. Then hammer it to seat the rings.. It will run cooler with the rough spots initially worn in a little.

Now race car and motorcycle engines don't get an initial break-in. they fire them up and hammer them into the ground. Of course they only last a race or two and get re-built. I say be gentle and then firm. My 106 mph run was probably a good thing.
 

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Normal running is fine. These engines have already been run hard at the factory. So... from day one... just drive them like normal.

The nice thing about this new Diesel, is that it uses oil jets, to keep the pistons cool. That's really the main issue with engine break in. On a conventional engine... the bulk of the heat, that is absorbed by the piston crown is transferred to the cyl walls, via the rings. SO... until the rings fully seat... you have a hard time getting rid of that heat. Also... on old engines... you had to "Run in" the piston to cyl wall clearance, to get the proper heat transfer. The new tech on the cyl's (Nicosil, Chrome/Au, graphite/iron) expands very little, and they can now manufacture the engine to closer tolerances. (that's why we are using thinner oils now)

Going back to Shaker's comment on cam break in... everything now is roller, or hard mated surfaces... so that's all history. BUT... the important thing to know... new engine oils will absolutely KILL old, "Flat Tappet" cam/lifter systems.

On Captain's comments: Yes... race engines are broken in hard. Back in the day... I grew up in SoCal, and raced SCORE desert series. I would freshen up my motorcycle engines... run them just long enough to make sure there were no leaks... then they would get abused for +50 miles in the hot desert sun. If I did my work right... I would go all season on one engine. (using caster bean oil)


Almost forgot... the only thing that really needs a "Break in" anymore, are the rear-end gears. They are made from tool steel, and aren't really hardened from the factory. That's because they want them to wear in (to be quiet) and to work harden. That's why you aren't supposed to tow a heavy load for about the first 500 miles. The teeth simply need to be flexed enough times to get hard.
 

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Well Dr. we all have our opinions and are entitled to them but I'm sticking to my story! BTW I'm a licensed mechanic of 38 years holding an Automotive, Heavy Equipment and a Truck and Coach license and have rebuilt everything from a chainsaw engine to a 16V71 Detroit. If your method works for you and your customers great but I have never had a personal vehicle that burnt oil or was low on power or failed prematurely on me. To each his own thats the great thing about living in the land of the free.
 

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Well Dr. we all have our opinions and are entitled to them but I'm sticking to my story! ..............
absolutely !! Do what you feel comfortable with, and don't let anyone sway your thoughts !! Besides... on an engine like this... the actual "Break-in" isn't a super critical thng, since it's all modern materials. That's basically why the book even says that no special break-in is required .


Just an FYI...... If I was to build an Old-School SB Chevy engine (cast pistons, cast iron block, flat tappets, pushrods, black oxide cam... etc)... I wouldn't do more than a single full throttle blast. (just to verify things) then... after that, it would be an old style break in. (low RPM's, and heat cycle and so on)
 

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FYI... your new truck has seen the same thing, as it's put on the dyno, at the end of the assembly line. (several full throttle runs)

I know this is an old thread, but I recently received my truck so I've been curious about somethings, and if they have already done some full throttle runs, then in essence the manufacturer really has broken it in already, so does it really matter what we do from that point on?












[/QUOTE]
 

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No special babying here, I drive mine like as I would any vehicle. If I need to mash the go pedal, I do it, no matter the temps....no problems or oil consumption here.
 

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Same here. Did about 600 miles normal then loaded it up and towed 6000# about 6000 miles. Perfect then and perfect now.
 
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