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Time to walk away from that engine.

GDE turns off the EGR valve and system. None of that crap. Wish GDE made their programs for all the major diesel products. That EGR system is a joke and it's a joke in other engines also. You idle a new Cummins for a while and it's EGR trouble.

Far as I can tell the only current diesel engine running well is one that is deleted with no EGR or an Ecodiesel with GDE.
 

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Discussion Starter #83
Captainmal, it's interesting you say that about idling. The first time I had to take it to the dealer to look at the regen not working was after pounding in fence posts off the back of the tail gate for a half day --- idling, hammer in a post, move ahead 10 feet, idle engine and continue the process. The following day- it said the particulate filter was 90%, regeneration failed, and threw a code. The shop told me don't idle the truck, and run it hard to keep the filter clean. Didn't seem right for what a truck can be expected to do... idling an engine is often the rule versus hitting the starter every few feet for a 1/2 mile. Like stop and go traffic on the Long Island expressway I'd think. There are other ways to fence, but this seems to hasten the pace.
 

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2018 2500 Laramie. CTD.
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Thinking why mine has been so reliable and not tuned is it gets worked so hard and from day one off the lot.

You may want to get a gasser for your next truck. Idling and new diesels are a bad combination.
 

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Discussion Starter #86
I think it's hard to get a real solid compromise; good fuel economy, good equipment trailer towing, hay & grain wagon pulling truck, utility use vehicle, go to church on Sunday, throw chains on and go in the woods to haul maple sap on Monday, take a highway trip a couple states away, and...all these things that in my mind a general purpose truck should do.

Yes, I think the next truck will be a 3/4 ton gas . Forget the good fuel economy and nice torque in a small package.
 

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2018 2500 Laramie. CTD.
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Keep us updated on the final results. Curious after major repair how it drives vs before. I hope it all works out for you. You have a good attitude about the whole thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #88
I'll be curious too. It's the bare minimum for repairs due to the fire. The insurance company was looking for the cheapest way out, FCA wants nothing to do with it. FCA would not warranty the manifold part which IS part of the power train warranty listed parts. It looks like if a fire was the cause of a power train covered failure, they will not stand behind any mechanical listed components. So, I think that means when that fire happened, the power train warranty also went up in smoke because arguably from this point forward all parts were assumed to be of good workmanship and materials. Now the fire that is not their manufacturer responsibility has made their good work defective. There's a lot of motivation for FCA to send the "Mr. Kon" letter. FCA no longer has to warranty virtually anything on the truck.

If I keep it, I will look into bonafide service contracts with specific verbiage acknowledging the fire. My guess is this truck is going to get expensive.

I'm hoping financially I can swing it to get a different truck. Beef prices took a nose dive over the summer months ( what's new? ). Not sure if money wise I can scrape the cash together till I see what cattle costs are in late winter. I need a couple bearings and 2 seals in one of the tractors too. That just ate up a few thousand. That truck fire really was about the last thing I needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #89
As far as good attitude, life goes on... But the next time I see a Ram commercial touting some country song, rural scenes, nostalgia, wrinkled old faces of experience, and that dependable Dodge truck tradition keeps coming through sorta crap... I'm sure I will declare shenanigans and shake my fist with a hearty shout of BS to FCA. Remember the Miranda Lambert Ram commercial??

I raise my glass
I thank the Lord above
For Daddy's hands
And Mama's dreams
He gave me roots
She gave me wings
...and Fiat Chrysler gave me the f**kins.


I think that's how the commercial goes...
 

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2018 2500 Laramie. CTD.
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Not easy being in business for yourself. Paycheck doesn't come in automatically every week or so. I've been in your shoes and collected a check as well. Nothing is easy.

FCA innovated and we are the Petri dish. I love what they created, EPA is the one to blame. Its by far when working the most capable 1/2 ton pickup on the planet. I've tested it to its max, no modifications and it just does what no other can.

But, its choked up, and boys do what boys do and make it work with a tune. I get it, now understand it, but will not condone .l I still give the 2500 with 6.4, 4:10, and rear air suspension a thumbs up till they get this egr issue thing figured out.

Your a survivor, this is minor stuff, I suspect compared to your families challenges as farmers you have incredible stories.
 

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Well if you keep it, deal with the EGR system. It soots up the engine in multiple ways. Turn it off with GDE or deal with a full mechanical delete to keep it clean.

Return with an update after you run it awhile.
 

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Discussion Starter #92
Picked up the truck this morning. Started up with the usual city bus diesel sound on a 37° morning. Drove it 70 miles round trip to look at a combine. Seemed to be fine.

So here is where it's getting complicated about the fire that's still being looked at. We know the original EGR cooler does not visibly appear defective, no plugging and the valves work. No codes on the engine, and yes it does have a pyrometer sensor after the EGR cooler that should have indicated the temperature was too high. Sensors appear to all function or that's a code from self diagnostics. The engine control unit is now what is being questioned. The mechanic ran it through its paces in real world driving over the weekend and can't see what made the EGR cooler push the hot gases through and cause the melt down leading to the fire. In end, the mechanic is suspicious he replaced the broken components, but did not fix the actual problem because it's not easily apparent as to why the EGR malfunctioned on a system design to throw codes before a fire.

Thoughts?? Who in the forum has extensive knowledge of the engine control and modulation from sensor inputs??
 

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Picked up the truck this morning. Started up with the usual city bus diesel sound on a 37° morning. Drove it 70 miles round trip to look at a combine. Seemed to be fine.

So here is where it's getting complicated about the fire that's still being looked at. We know the original EGR cooler does not visibly appear defective, no plugging and the valves work. No codes on the engine, and yes it does have a pyrometer sensor after the EGR cooler that should have indicated the temperature was too high. Sensors appear to all function or that's a code from self diagnostics. The engine control unit is now what is being questioned. The mechanic ran it through its paces in real world driving over the weekend and can't see what made the EGR cooler push the hot gases through and cause the melt down leading to the fire. In end, the mechanic is suspicious he replaced the broken components, but did not fix the actual problem because it's not easily apparent as to why the EGR malfunctioned on a system design to throw codes before a fire.

Thoughts?? Who in the forum has extensive knowledge of the engine control and modulation from sensor inputs??
I'm pretty sure the GDE guys have intimate knowledge of the engine controls and EGR function. That's who I would try to get an opinion from.
 

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Discussion Starter #95
Thanks, that's a good thought to talk with GDE.

To the reference that the fire destroyed the cause: the wire harness despite being melted was all capable of functioning after the fire and was easily looked at and examined for cause. Remember that the engine system never produced a system error code. FCA denied responsibility on the fire without actually understanding any truths as to the cause of the fire. It was a culpability and victim impact assessment. The dealership was amazed that not a part was picked up or removed to be looked at by the FCA investigator. It's really leaning to be an onboard computer glitch. One can program the system to malfunction and create a scenario like what happened, but it's not supposed to do that from the factory.

The cause of the fire was from the EGR cooler allowing the hot exhaust gases to pour into the plastic manifold, which burned out the swirl flapper valves and melted a hole through the plastic intake manifold. The hole allowed the hot gases to melt wiring harness, and melt holes into the fuel lines. The temperatures caused ignition of the plastic and fuel.

The dealership is working to reduce my cost as much as they can within reason.

The fact that the consumer should pay anything for this repair as the facts add up is ridiculous. One forum thread contributor thought it interesting for me to take a (FCA) guilty till proven innocent platform. Chrysler has not offered any basis for their position beyond a letter that stated, "we are led to believe." Their investigation conclusion is proprietary and as such they reserve the right to not reveal what has led them to believe.

We purchase new vehicles to defer and reduce the risks of mechanical malfunction. The $40,000 new cost of this truck equates to a level of surety that we will not have break downs, we will not be stranded, and there is a quid pro quo of many presumed positive externalities that justify purchase.

But, I'm a dirt farmer, I'm a relatively poor average person, and FCA knows that. Litigation? Attorney costs? ( insert laughter here ). There was a comment that chimed in on a different forum thread contributor who was venting ED truck issues and the rebuttal said to the effect that: don't think FCA is any different than the rest of the auto makers in denying responsibility. It's a debatable argument ad nauseum. What struck me in my particular situation that I can with direct certainty state is that FCA did not perform a transparent, thorough investigation to establish common understanding of reasonable material values before rendering opinion and bias on the effected consumer. Establishing the facts and cause to ensure I or future purchaser drive a safe repaired vehicle that will not start on fire, according to their silence after the fire, is not their responsibility.

Translation: FCA is not a credible entity to work with when you become the fraction of consumers that have a serious issue with one of their products.

Time for me to get back to farming that dirt so I can pay for the privilege of buying an FCA machine. Thanks FCA!

I'm feeling as bitter as the dry 30° air this All Saints Day November morning.
 

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Discussion Starter #96
Someone sent me a message today talking about their EcoDiesel that burned to the ground asking about my situation.

As a follow up to my first post, I was contacted by NTSB in March, and the guy I spoke with seemed to indicate they are collecting VINs and compiling what conclusions were reached from available investigations. There have been enough Ram 1500 EcoDiesel engine fires that it's getting noticed at the federal level.

In the end I got rid of the fire-truck. Traded it in at a dealership for a new 3/4 ton gasser with an old school proven V8.
 

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Someone sent me a message today talking about their EcoDiesel that burned to the ground asking about my situation.

As a follow up to my first post, I was contacted by NTSB in March, and the guy I spoke with seemed to indicate they are collecting VINs and compiling what conclusions were reached from available investigations. There have been enough Ram 1500 EcoDiesel engine fires that it's getting noticed at the federal level.

In the end I got rid of the fire-truck. Traded it in at a dealership for a new 3/4 ton gasser with an old school proven V8.
all models and engines can have fires= would not rule out the ECOD because of that
 

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I have a 2015 EcoDiesel that caught fire last Friday. The fire occurred at night and I had it towed in to the dealer so I have not had a chance to look for the source of the fire. I was not towing anything, lost power and then smoke cam from under the hood and through the vents similar to others on this site. Dealer said they could look at it tomorrow.
 

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I have a 2015 EcoDiesel that caught fire last Friday. The fire occurred at night and I had it towed in to the dealer so I have not had a chance to look for the source of the fire. I was not towing anything, lost power and then smoke cam from under the hood and through the vents similar to others on this site. Dealer said they could look at it tomorrow.
Nasty first post. Welcome to the forum.

Start a new thread on your issue. This one is from last year. Title your issue and keep us posted.
 

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First time post, frequent reader. Sorry for the length, but I want to be accurate. Last week (10/3/17) my 2015 Ecodiesel with 46k miles engine caught on fire. While driving and towing and empty equipment trailer at highway speed ( 55mph ) the engine began to make high pitched knocking noises, followed by partial power, and the truck started decelerating as the engine rpms dropped, then stalled. I re-started the truck and the idle seemed normal, no check engine lights displayed, I was wondering if it was a fuel filter issue causing a lean air/fuel mix or computer issue and began to drive again but quickly realized there was no power, and poor acceleration. The engine began to decrease speed and again stalled, but this time gray, then black smoke came into the cabin through the air vents, and black smoke started rolling out of the front grill and hood seams. Black smoke that smelled like burning diesel in addition to plastic. Quickly adding up the senses produced the fact that I had an engine compartment fire. I happened to have a good sized fire extinguisher in the trailer hitch tool box, without much delay in realizing car fires spread quick and not wanting a fire bomb on the US Route 20 bridge overpass to NYS Route 88, I opened the hood with pin pulled extinguisher in hand and noticed black smoke and flames coming directly from under the plastic cover at the center top of the engine ( the one that covers up the fuel and injector lines). I was able to extinguish the fire in short order. Shaken up a little as this is a first for me, I called for a towing company to take the truck to the dealership. The dealership started to look at it the following morning, they were told to stop work repair until Chrysler could send an investigator. I had a short phone interview on 10/6/17 where basic questions were asked. Monday 10/9/17 an investigator examined the truck. I received a letter today from "Mr. Kon" stating that the investigation result has led them to believe that the fire was not due to manufacturing responsibility. No additional details were offered or disclosed as to cause and would not be offered if requested as that information is proprietary. The truck is entirely stock, no modifications, and has been serviced regularly at the dealership where purchased. No assistance will be offered by Fiat Chrysler of any sort and this will not be covered by the warranty. The cost is on me. I lodged a complaint at several levels today. Chrysler could care less and offers no avenue for discussion. The dealership is shaking their heads in disbelief of the letter. No parts were taken for examination or study (melted wiring harness, melted fuel hoses/lines), without any detail provided, it appears the investigation was entirely superficial. The truth is I want to know why did this happen? It is not normal order to have an engine catch on fire. If there is a 3rd party cause, then what happened? There are many thousands of Ram 1500 Ecodiesel trucks driven daily, at this point I am led to believe each of us have a genuine risk of a fire under the hood above and beyond what is deemed acceptable. Statistically this could be a real rarity or it could be just the beginning and a matter of time for all of these trucks to catch fire. Fiat Chrysler will not pay to repair this engine fire despite still being well within the power train warranty time frame, Fiat Chrysler will not pay partial expense, will not offer to pay for something as simple as a loaner car till the repair is complete, they will not buy the burned vehicle back, they will not communicate any further on the matter. If by choice I will not purchase any FCA vehicle, and based on my experience- I would seriously question anyone in the public buying their product from Chrysler. An engine fire in a 2015 model year 46,000 mile diesel fueled truck under warranty that will not be covered by the manufacturer is not normal. Any other engine fires out there???
Go to the facebook page, "ecodiesel owners information and discussion" page. there have been at least 6-10 truck fires the past few months. Also two didn't get any help from FCA until their insurance folks stepped in and demanded it. FCA Is a damn joke! I hate having a wonderful truck made by such baffoons that won't stand behind their product. really pisses me off. Thank goodness I've got a healthy 2015 with 65k miles on it right now.
 
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