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Sorry but I have to make a statement that applies to everyone who buys any vehicle, to start sorry you have the issue that totaled your truck, that is why we have insurance. But the way your post reads it also sounds like you still have two years worth of loan to pay off. I am not understanding you saying you got back $2,000 dollars then you say you still have 2 years to pay on the loan, all monies should have went to the lien holder and if the insurance payoff was not enough to satisfy the loan amount then you are liable for the remaining balance of the loan.

Here is the statement that applies to everyone, do not take out these 72 month, 84 month and yes even 96 month loans on a vehicle. You are upside down for almost the entire term of the loan, the poster I am replying to from what I can determine from his post got $2,000 dollars back on a 4 year old truck with 87,000 miles on it and again from what I can determine from his post still had another two years left on the loan so I don't really understand how he got $2,000 dollars back when there is a lien holder on the truck for the loan that he says still has two years to go before it is paid off. But let's assume that the loan was paid off by insurance and there was a remaining balance of $2,000 dollars that went to the poster.

These trucks prices have become outrageous with 1500 series trucks pricing out over $74,000 dollars for them. It is a vehicle meant to move you from point A to point B. The only way most people can afford these trucks these days is to take out loans for 6, 7, 8 and even 9 years, that is just not a smart decision financially for a vehicle.

I just bought a left over 2019 Ram 1500 Classic Laramie ecodiesel and it had an MSRP of $50,265 dollars, but I would not have paid that for it, I would have moved on to another truck. In this case being it was a left over 2019 that they had on their lot for 10 months they were eager to move it to get it off their floor plan, so out the door after tax, tag, title and extended warranty I paid just over $29,000 dollars for it. I only took out a loan for 48 months to pay it off within a reasonable amount of time as I am not in a position to just pay cash for a vehicle right now.

The point is people need to start being smarter about the vehicles they buy and the loans they take out on them. Don't get wooed by the fancy options that drive the price up into the $70,000 plus dollar range and then have to take out Long loans tying you up for the next 6 to 8 years paying on a vehicle. If you average 15,000 miles a year and have a 7 year loan you will have 105,000 miles on that vehicle before you pay it off. Stretch it out to 8 years and you will have 120,000 miles on it before it is paid off.

Compare that with only a 48 month loan and you will have 60,000 miles on the vehicle but it is now paid off. Never treat a vehicle as an investment because they are a depreciating asset that will one day not be worth anything if you keep it long enough.

I will only go to 48 months on a loan for a vehicle, if I can't make that happen then the vehicle is just to expansive for me and it is time to look for another vehicle that I can fit into a 48 month loan.
You missed the point somewhere along the line. Point is where I hold FCA responsible. Insurance did pay it off as stated above. And whether or not I took out a 4 or 6 year loan is irrelevant to the situation. Let say the fire didn't happen and I was driving down the street and I wreck my vehicle, whether it was my fault or not, that is not FCA. If a tree falls on it, not FCA. It gets stolen, not FCA. Then there is a recall for an engine part that can cause an engine fire AND there are no parts available for 7 to 9 months, no loaners or other solutions for a situation that can be deadly....that is on FCA. I did my part on maintained my truck. I took it in when recall was issued....TWICE. So yes, there is a liability on FCA because if the parts were available and fixed and no engine fire ever happened, I would still be happy. If the truck burned down after the fix, oh well, my crappy luck.
The vehicles are an investment and diesels simply last longer than gas engines. There is more maintenance but you take care of the vehicle and it lasts forever. Yes, transmission, brakes and other parts wear out just like any vehicle, but the heart and life blood of the vehicle stays strong. This is why I purchased the vehicle and the great mileage that we get from these small blocks.
Back to the point, due to the negligent actions of FCA, they are liable for producing a faulty part that can cause total loss of a vehicle and other deadlier situations. And yes, it has affected me negatively. FCA is liable. The fact that you are giving advice about 4 year loans vs 6 year loans and affordability is irrelevant. Your statement also underlines that I couldn't afford that vehicle in a loan of 48 months or that I'm an idiot for not doing it in 48 months. I could have but that is not the route I chose to take. And I state again, no matter the financial option that anyone chooses, it is irrelevant to a vehicle fire that it all could have been prevented if the parts were available. Have a great day, im off to work.
 

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I agree that the amount or length of your loans has nothing to do with the overall situation and that FCA is liable for repairing all of these trucks covered under the recall. Where you drew a line in the sand was when you acepted the insurance payout. At that point, it is no longer your fight with FCA but your insurance company's fight. Unless you are making a loss of work/business claim against FCA for the time that your truck was out of service.
 

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We all have good reason to be bitter with FCA about their handling of these safety recalls. My EGR cooler leaked just after my warranty expired after 14 months from new. FCA knew they had the issue back then in 2017. Luckily I decided to remove the EGR /cooler myself rather than pay thousands for new parts that were backordered for months and as a result have avoided all recalls, AEMs, and a litany of other issues.
Some owners are vocal about this debacle and some accept it. To each their own.
 

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We all have good reason to be bitter with FCA about their handling of these safety recalls. My EGR cooler leaked just after my warranty expired after 14 months from new. FCA knew they had the issue back then in 2017. Luckily I decided to remove the EGR /cooler myself rather than pay thousands for new parts that were backordered for months and as a result have avoided all recalls, AEMs, and a litany of other issues.
Some owners are vocal about this debacle and some accept it. To each their own.
Exactly Ecosparky. Im being vocal right now because it just happened to me. Im getting over it already....slowly but surely. I just wanted to post to show that this is really happening to a lot of ecodiesel owners. There are plenty of cases. Heck, I already signed up for the upcoming class action lawsuit. Im angry because I was almost done. It was supposed to be my forever vehicle. No more payments except for maintenance and repairs. Now I have to start over AND I don't really want to go to another brand. I love the look and features of Ram. I had the Laramie Longhorn with the air ride suspension. It suited all my needs. The timing couldn't have been worse. I do use it for work. Im in the middle of buying a home and can't do anything until the house closes. So I'm stuck borrowing a vehicle until it is all said and done and I lose money not being able to work at full capacity.
My entire point of this was to put it out there that it is happening to many ecodiesels. Hopefully as more people post, more owners are aware. It is not as public as other vehicle mishaps but the more people talk about it, the less that FCA will be able to sweep it under the rug as "engine fires happen" and "sorry for your loss". And I know this most likely FCA's path to protect themselves and a cheaper course until they are forced to deal with the many issues. That's why class action lawsuits form. They will settle, save money in the long run, and lawyers get paid. Ecodiesel owners will get the repairs made,, possible longer warranty and maybe some money. This will take years to happen all the while FCA will deny responsibility and slowly repair affected vehicles while others burn down. And like many others, we are standing around wondering WTF just happened.
Unless pictures are wanted, my purpose is done. I feel for all of the ecodiesel owners that have to go through this. I have roughly a month to think about what is the next truck I want to purchase.
 

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You still bought more truck than you could really afford, you chose to go into debt on that vehicle for the next six years of your life, that is all on you not FCA or anyone else. You got compensated by your insurance company so I am not really understanding your complaint with FCA on this matter. Are you trying to get double compensated once by your insurance company and again by FCA, if so you could be committing fraud because you already were compensated by your insurance company and once the insurance company paid out they become the lawful owners of the vehicle not you if they totaled the vehicle. So if FCA was to make any financial compensation at this point it would go to the insurance company not you. Cars/trucks catch on fire all the time for different reasons and insurance covers it.

You are making is sound like ecodiesel vehicles are just bursting into flames left and right and that is not the case, the faulty EGR cooler can result in a fire that does not mean it is going to happen to everyone.

On time parts manufacturing is a big part of the problem in getting parts, there are contracts and the assembly lines making the parts are already running at full capacity so there is no excess capacity to come up with over 100,000 EGR coolers in short order. You may not like that answer but it is reality.

I get it you were one of the unlucky ones who's truck caught on fire, sucks to be you in this case but again you have already been compensated by your insurance company but you made a bad choice when you wanted the fully optioned out top of the line truck and could not really afford it so you took out a 6 year loan and in the end that personal decision bit you in the rear end and instead of learning a life lesson from it you want to blame FCA for a financial decision you made.

I was a police officer for 25 years I worked my share of vehicle fires over the years and every single one of them was covered by insurance not the manufacture. No manufacture is excluded from vehicle fires. Fords have been known to catch fire sitting parked due to a faulty cruise control system. General Motor vehicles have caught on fire, anyone remember the old Pontiac Fiero that would catch on fire while driving, all of those were covered by insurance not General Motors.
 

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Update: Dealer mechanic started repairs, the EGR cooler overheated, melted plastic manifold and put a hole in it, hot return exhaust gases melted the wiring and fuel hoses that made a healthy fire at 55mph. FCA still not stepping up, but they did call the dealership and said to stop repairs so they can send another investigator out to look. Mechanic said he swore at the request because he was two bolts and one hose from pulling the cab (specific wiring harnesses being replaced that are easiest without a cab on). This is a total PITA. Thanks Fiat Chrysler! If after this second look they don't start to warm up to the idea that maybe... Just maybe there was a manufacturer defect they will truly register in the worthless file.

Insurance company will pay for $3100 in parts plus labor, but they are not covering(??) the EGR Cooler that caused the fire which is $1300. Back when I thought it was just the harness- sure maybe a mouse ate it, but now FCA are being obtuse (nicest word I could think of) in their denial of manufacturer's responsibility.

These days I'm thinking the Amish got it right. Horses have a statistically low tendency to spontaneously combust while driving down the road. They have a open emissions system, no exhaust gas return valves or EGR coolers to go wrong.
I know that it is statistically remote that the methane flapper could get stuck and if it did a horse may also spontaneously combust.. :rolleyes:
 
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