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and to think your '21 Cummins actually is something like 100 lbs lighter than the '18 and prior 6.7L engines. The block was changed from grey cast iron to CGI for the '19 and newer blocks, it's lighter and stronger.
And the 6.7 cummins is a somewhat significant weight savings over the 5.9.
 

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They said the truck only had 4000 miles on it, low mileage failure is normal with something wrong. Unlike the ecodiesels which run fine for tens of thousands of miles and unexpectedly and till now unexplainably toss their cookies.
 

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And the 6.7 cummins is a somewhat significant weight savings over the 5.9.
Despite the displacement increase from both the 12V and 24V 5.9, the 6.7 was about only 30 lbs lighter until the CGI block in 2019. I don't think I'd call 10% weight loss significant when it comes to a CTD, you still have 1K lbs to deal with.
 

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My memory is far far from perfect but I thought I remembered reading a dressed 5.9 was just shy of 1200 lbs and a dressed 6.7 was 900-ish.
 

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900 lbs for the CGI block or the old block?
 

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I really doubt the older non cgi block 6.7 is lighter then 5.9. The 6.7 has whole bunch of emissions equipment like egr cooler/ egr valve, piping, vg turbo, etc. Can't see how the weight was reduced if the block was made of a similar materials.
But I might be wrong here.
 

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Going off the specs on the CumminsHub website the 12V 5.9 engine is 1100 lbs, the 24V 5.9 engine is 1150 lbs, the '07-'18 6.7 engine is 1120 and the '19+ CGI is listed as 1060 lbs. Those are all listed as dry weight
 

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I found a few of those numbers also but was not noted dressed/dry etc.

I do remember reading in '07-'08 when the 6.7 started production, that it weighed less than the outgoing 5.9... but that has been some 14 years ago now lol damn nothing stops time.
 

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Going off the specs on the CumminsHub website the 12V 5.9 engine is 1100 lbs, the 24V 5.9 engine is 1150 lbs, the '07-'18 6.7 engine is 1120 and the '19+ CGI is listed as 1060 lbs. Those are all listed as dry weight
1120 pounds. That some serious engine weight. But as we look into the future what will the battery weigh for a HD truck?
 

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But as we look into the future what will the battery weigh for a HD truck?
I don't think HD trucks will be strictly BEV, they'll most likely end up as a hydrogen hybrid. Cummins has invested pretty heavily into hydrogen as a path for clean engine tech.
 

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I don't think HD trucks will be strictly BEV, they'll most likely end up as a hydrogen hybrid. Cummins has invested pretty heavily into hydrogen as a path for clean engine tech.
That will take a huge amount of solar and wind (or nuclear) generation to produce enough hydrogen! It's a good use of intermittent generation.
 

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That electric truck stuff Ford is playing with would sure be a serious handicap. Just the 400 mile run to my hunting camp, a 6 hour ride, would take at least two days.

Solo operation may make 200 miles and then you find somewhere to charge the darn thing. Wait and go again. But towing a trailer.... wonder what the range is then? Well after you get to the camp how do you charge back in the woods with little to no electricity. Oh, you need to tow the big trailer with the tractor?

Hundreds of pounds in batteries and the huge expense of the darn things sure factors in another major glitch. My stupid ( I do mean stupid) sister has a husband that forced her into a hybrid electric Honda car. We rarely talk but did hear they spent thousands to replace some kind of battery or batteries in that thing. Not sure if a warranty was involved but the thing can't be much more than four years old.

In town daily transportation of 50 miles or less is about what an electric vehicle is good for. Then only if you have a place to charge or build a charging system at the house. Now pay for the electricity. You don't get it free. If electric demand goes way up maybe you get none???
 

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All valid points and some of the same thoughts I had reading the e-F150 specs. Looks good as long as you don't plan on using it as a truck. Along the same lines as my friend that has one of the eco engines in his F150. Batteries will be changing in composition that both reduces weight, decreases charge time, and increases range. I've not seen any details on how these changes will effect towing. As for adding weight, I'm guessing that the final battery pack and associated components will be similar weight to current ICEs.
 

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That electric truck stuff Ford is playing with would sure be a serious handicap. Just the 400 mile run to my hunting camp, a 6 hour ride, would take at least two days.

Solo operation may make 200 miles and then you find somewhere to charge the darn thing. Wait and go again. But towing a trailer.... wonder what the range is then?
^^^ this exactly
None of the big three need to leave their own backyard to know what an electric truck has to be able to do to own the EV truck market.
Pick any weekend in the summertime here in Michigan and watch a bunch the travel trailers head west to the Lake Michigan recreational areas and sand dunes. Coming from the Metro Detroit area that's 3-4 hour drive while towing provided your not stuck in traffic.
They just can't pack enough energy density in a BEV vehicle to tow a trailer that far without stopping to charge.
 

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When I look at the usage of the Cummins, nothing even on the horizon can compete.
The 300 hemi? I would say 90 % of it's usage is all under 200 miles, so charging at home would work. I would miss the hemi big time, but recently drove a dual motor Tesla. Words can't describe how fast it is. Incredible acceleration.
 

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That electric truck stuff Ford is playing with would sure be a serious handicap. Just the 400 mile run to my hunting camp, a 6 hour ride, would take at least two days.

Solo operation may make 200 miles and then you find somewhere to charge the darn thing. Wait and go again. But towing a trailer.... wonder what the range is then? Well after you get to the camp how do you charge back in the woods with little to no electricity. Oh, you need to tow the big trailer with the tractor?

Hundreds of pounds in batteries and the huge expense of the darn things sure factors in another major glitch. My stupid ( I do mean stupid) sister has a husband that forced her into a hybrid electric Honda car. We rarely talk but did hear they spent thousands to replace some kind of battery or batteries in that thing. Not sure if a warranty was involved but the thing can't be much more than four years old.

In town daily transportation of 50 miles or less is about what an electric vehicle is good for. Then only if you have a place to charge or build a charging system at the house. Now pay for the electricity. You don't get it free. If electric demand goes way up maybe you get none???
Of course, you would buy a vehicle that meets your needs. Some people use a truck for deliveries around town or do work around town. Perhaps you see gardeners who work within a limited geographic area. A lot of people are happy with electric vehicles and your 50 mile range is about 6-8 years out of date. Setting up charging at home is not a big deal, especially if you have a garage.

As far as your sister's car, you may not have heard the full story: "The hybrid battery may be covered up to 10 years and 150,000 miles depending on the state in which the vehicle is registered and operated." Hybrids are well proven and successful for many applications.
 

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That electric truck stuff Ford is playing with would sure be a serious handicap. Just the 400 mile run to my hunting camp, a 6 hour ride, would take at least two days.

Solo operation may make 200 miles and then you find somewhere to charge the darn thing. Wait and go again. But towing a trailer.... wonder what the range is then? Well after you get to the camp how do you charge back in the woods with little to no electricity. Oh, you need to tow the big trailer with the tractor?
Some video blogs imply advertised EV range is dropped to 1/4 of max range when towing at max rated weight and flat ground. That's based on a Tesla X model towing an enclosed cargo trailer. So 400 miles max range only gets you 100 miles best case. That's some range anxiety!

For the real world they'll need to develop EV trailers with batteries designed into the floor frame. Lots of expense and weight but it'll extend the range somewhat. Gotta hope trailer towing doesn't go the way of the dodo bird.
 

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So 400 miles max range only gets you 100 miles best case. That's some range anxiety!
That's in good weather, now make it a deer hunting weekend where the ambient temps are hovering around and below freezing. That 400 mile range is probably cut down to maybe 300 and towing the trailer to the hunting camp is probably impossible.
Everyone thinks they want BEVs, until the recharging structure can be addressed and the batteries themselves are made a whole lot more environmentally friendly and practically completely recyclable they're just the latest fad.
 
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