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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My truck is a Longhorn, quad cab, 4x4 with air suspension.

Today I towed my 21' Ranger bass boat to and from a lake about 40 miles from me. The boat and trailer, loaded, weighs pretty close to 4000# (maybe a bit more I have never weighed it but the boat, dry, is 2000#) I averaged 41MPH there and 43MPH home in calm conditions. It's mostly rural roads, a few hills, couple stop signs, 5 or so red lights and I caught an antique show holding up my good progress, on the way there which most likely explains the lower MPH average. :mad: I reset the EVIC in my driveway and took the first photo when I arrived at the boat ramp and vice versa for the ride home. On the trip there I used tow/haul mode and did not use it on the way back.

On the way there:


On the way home:


I am coming from (2) Ford F250 6.7 diesels to this truck. I have towed with a lot of different trucks over the last 25 years, Ford 5.4 1500 in 4x4, 2wd, Small V8 ford f150s, 2500 ford gas trucks, an FX4 250 with 6.7 and most recently a Ford F250 2WD with a 6.7 and I've towed all typed of trailers, small utility, 16' landscape trailers, 21' bumper pull tow haulers, 24' enclosed race trailers, ski boats, bass boats etc. This new eco diesel, longhorn edition with the air suspension is BY FAR the best ride, while towing, of anything I have ever owned. EVER. The first thing I was impressed with was when I hooked the boat up you can see and hear the air suspension leveling the truck. My truck sat perfectly level with a 2" drop ball.

As for the towing, obviously this truck doesnt have the 800 lb-ft of torque and you can tell you have a load back there. If you're going to compare the towing of this truck to something like a big V8 turbo diesel it's not the same. Not even close. You can't just mash on it, whip in and out of traffic like you can with a big diesel. It shifts a lot. It backshifts on every incline and upshifts, IMO, prematurely but you can control that probably at teh expense of the fuel effeciency but gawddang the ride makes up for it. But it smokes any towing I have ever done with a gasoline engine. I used to cringe on rough roads in my F250 while towing, I'd get a headache if I drove a couple hundred miles around town from the rough ride. This truck isn't anything like that.

In my big diesel, on the same trip, I'd get around 12.5-13.5 MPG. I was hoping for a little better than the 16.4 I got but considering the driving conditions I guess I'm OK with it. I'd guess that I'll get 17 - 18 on the interstate without all the stop and go.

I drive about 40k miles a year and 30 of those are around town probably 10000 miles with boat in tow. I'd get 18 with the F250 in the city and I'm around 25 with the ecodiesel in the same conditions so that's the sweetness for me. If I were towing, regularly, in urban areas I think I'd pass on the ecodiesel and stick with the big v8 because of all the traffic and entrance ramps but for the recreational towing, I can sacrifice the torque for the 100 fold benefits I get with all the city driving I do. The bottomline? I'm very happy with my purchase.

Hope this helps anyone on the fence.
 

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Good info, thx. Today I moved my hitch from my F-250 to the Ecodiesel. The Ram's hitch receive is a full 5" higher, which is a problem. I was only able to fix <4" of that by reconfiguring the hitch. Grumble. Tomorrow I'm going to go fetch the trailer, load the race car in it and go for a test tow. I've been waiting for months to find out what my mpg towing will be. It's a 24' enclosed.
 

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Don't forget as well you only got like 800 miles on her so far!! I am sure in a few thousand when she is good and broke in you will get up nearer to 20mpg
 

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Thanks for the review, well done! I assume you have 3.55 gears and 20" wheels?
 

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Something tells me you were easy on the throttle either.

Thanks for the review, well done! I assume you have 3.55 gears and 20" wheels?
I know for sure 20" since he has the longhorn and I'd assume 3.55 as he picked up one of the first allotment of trucks which all had 3.55.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the review, well done! I assume you have 3.55 gears and 20" wheels?
Yes sir.

Something tells me you were easy on the throttle either.




I know for sure 20" since he has the longhorn and I'd assume 3.55 as he picked up one of the first allotment of trucks which all had 3.55.
I did make a couple of passes on some "sunday drivers". A few times I mashed on it but once I got to 65mph I tried to baby it.

Did you notice a difference between using tow/haul mode and having it off on the return trip?
I did. It doesn't shift as often, stays in the appropriate gear longer and engine brakes more.. or downshifts earlier when stopping. The truck shifts so smooth that it's not easy to keep up with the gear you're in but I dont think it uses the 8th gear in tow haul. I'll have to check the manual.
 

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Today was also my first day towing my boat (another Ranger, mine is a Reata 1850) and it weighs about the same at 4,000 lbs with gear and full tank of gas. My trip to the lake was 96 miles round trip, similar to cdill35 as well. However, my elevation is markedly different, I'm guessing. I started at 4,600 feet above sea level, up a mountain pass to a 7,010 ft summit and then down a little to the lake at 6,100 ft.. Mostly highway speeds on the Interstate. For those who may not ever drive at elevation above sea level or in mountainous terrain, the higher the elevation the lower the horsepower. In gasoline engines, 7,000 ft of elevation reduces horsepower approximately 25-30%. I've read that diesel engines experience less hit to horsepower at altitude than gasoline, and considering we have a turbo on the ED, perhaps even less.

Needless to say, all engine types are challenged in this part of the country. Glad to report that my ED handled things remarkably well. There was a point about 1/2 mile from the summit of the canyon that traffic slowed to ~ 40 mph because of several semi-trucks that have a hard time running this particular section. After passing them, trying to get back up to 65 mph was too tough and I maxed out (pedal to the floor) at 60 mph until the summit. In the truck were two people (~ 350 lbs total) and a full tank of diesel (another ~ 200 lbs?). No additional gear in the truck. Total experience driving was great. I know the weight was behind me, but less rocking/bucking than my previous large SUV tow vehicle.

Mileage per gallon was also better than my old 5.7 liter 8-cyclinder gas machine. I averaged 13.5 mpg on the way up and 17.5 mpg on the return trip. Combined average was 15.2 mpg. The old machine would averaged 9-10 mpg on this trip. I hope for higher mpg's as the truck gets more miles on it (just over 500 right now). I'll be doing more towing in a couple of weeks with an 850 mile round trip run to Lake Powell for a fishing trip. Both flat and mountainous terrain to challenge the ED engine.

If you are on the fence about this truck's ability to tow, the ED and Ram 1500 are an easy one to recommend to others. The ride is much better than any truck/SUV I've ever driven. The engine is extremely capable. The drivetrain is silky smooth even with 4,000 lbs attached to the hitch.
 

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I feel your pain with that one.

I grew up in SoCal... and our typical dirtbike trip had us going over a pass at close to 5000' msl. THEN... a few times a year we would go up to Bear Mtn for some woods riding, and the pass took us up over 8000' msl. And finally... once a year we would head out the Lee Vining for a camping trip. The pass getting out there was well over 13,000' !!!!! Even without towing, and just having a bed full of gear... it was full throttle for the last 2000' of the pass. (just no air up there)
 

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Also remember CDill your maxed out Longhorn weighs a little over 6,000# with all of your options. In comparison your lariat you just got rid of was a hair over 7,000# with the diesel in it. So your ram is not much lighter than the ford but the engine makes about half the power and is being asked to do nearly the same amount of work. The Ram does have an 8spd vs 6spd in the ford so it has more choices to keep the motor in the sweet spot but as you noticed it will keep hunting for those gears.
 

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Today was also my first day towing my boat (another Ranger, mine is a Reata 1850) and it weighs about the same at 4,000 lbs with gear and full tank of gas. My trip to the lake was 96 miles round trip, similar to cdill35 as well. However, my elevation is markedly different, I'm guessing. I started at 4,600 feet above sea level, up a mountain pass to a 7,010 ft summit and then down a little to the lake at 6,100 ft.. Mostly highway speeds on the Interstate. For those who may not ever drive at elevation above sea level or in mountainous terrain, the higher the elevation the lower the horsepower. In gasoline engines, 7,000 ft of elevation reduces horsepower approximately 25-30%. I've read that diesel engines experience less hit to horsepower at altitude than gasoline, and considering we have a turbo on the ED, perhaps even less.

Needless to say, all engine types are challenged in this part of the country. Glad to report that my ED handled things remarkably well. There was a point about 1/2 mile from the summit of the canyon that traffic slowed to ~ 40 mph because of several semi-trucks that have a hard time running this particular section. After passing them, trying to get back up to 65 mph was too tough and I maxed out (pedal to the floor) at 60 mph until the summit. In the truck were two people (~ 350 lbs total) and a full tank of diesel (another ~ 200 lbs?). No additional gear in the truck. Total experience driving was great. I know the weight was behind me, but less rocking/bucking than my previous large SUV tow vehicle.

Mileage per gallon was also better than my old 5.7 liter 8-cyclinder gas machine. I averaged 13.5 mpg on the way up and 17.5 mpg on the return trip. Combined average was 15.2 mpg. The old machine would averaged 9-10 mpg on this trip. I hope for higher mpg's as the truck gets more miles on it (just over 500 right now). I'll be doing more towing in a couple of weeks with an 850 mile round trip run to Lake Powell for a fishing trip. Both flat and mountainous terrain to challenge the ED engine.

If you are on the fence about this truck's ability to tow, the ED and Ram 1500 are an easy one to recommend to others. The ride is much better than any truck/SUV I've ever driven. The engine is extremely capable. The drivetrain is silky smooth even with 4,000 lbs attached to the hitch.
Air suspension?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Nice! When the wife and I go to Vegas we always include a striped bass trip on Mead. Never been to Powell.
 

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Never been to Powell.
One of the best Man made wonders in the world. Sunset against the canyon walls is splendid. If you can make it some day, it is worth the trip.

This is the best time of the year to visit for recreation.
 

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I just flew to Seattle and drove my truck home, getting a solid 29mpg average to Sacramento. There, I hooked up my empty 20' enclosed cargo trailer and averaged 17.6 over 350 hwy miles. Not bad,,,
 

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The enclosed cargo trailer tow tweaks my interest. Most of the time I tow something with the wind resistance of a parachute. From past experience it does not seem to make much difference how much it weighs, within reason. It's the design of the front of the trailer that makes the difference in fuel mileage.

Prior tows I read about were open trailers hauling equipment or boats. They don't have frontal block that creates lots of wind resistance.

Sure waiting to hear of someone pulling a 5 - 8 K camper.
 

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The enclosed cargo trailer tow tweaks my interest. Most of the time I tow something with the wind resistance of a parachute. From past experience it does not seem to make much difference how much it weighs, within reason. It's the design of the front of the trailer that makes the difference in fuel mileage.
The big enchilada is the rear of the trailer not the front. Teardrops are sloped at the rear, not front, because a gently sloping rear is the optimum shape. The shape of the front isn't that important.
 

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The big enchilada is the rear of the trailer not the front. Teardrops are sloped at the rear, not front, because a gently sloping rear is the optimum shape. The shape of the front isn't that important.
Exactly although the front is important too. You don't want a parachute, but the rear is incredibly important. Google "Bowlus Road Chief" if you want to see a really aerodynamic travel trailer. It looks like a big tadpole. The discussion here is interesting regarding cargo trailers, but they typically aren't much higher than the roof of most 4WD pickups. I had to haul my kids belongings in a U-haul that was about 6x6x12 feet. It weighed 2000 pounds empty and probably 3000 pounds full. Over about 250 miles I was able to get about 15.5 miles per gallon in my Tundra. My travel trailer is a Forest River R-POD. You would think it is aerodynamic because it has a severely sloped front and back profile. It isn't though. It is like a parachute. It also weighs in at around 2000 pounds empty and 3000 pounds full. I'm happy to see 11mpg with that behind me. It sits well over ten feet tall but is only about 6 feet wide. Aerodynamics are complicated and pretty much absent in travel trailer design, mainly I guess because making a living space out a tear drop design isn't that easy.
 
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