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My truck hits 215F coolant temp without a trailer. This is too warm for my liking. I couldn’t dream of towing with my ED. The Cummins trucks will get tow duty.
 

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My truck hits 215F coolant temp without a trailer. This is too warm for my liking. I couldn’t dream of towing with my ED. The Cummins trucks will get tow duty.
Hmm. Well, you may be wired more tight on this issue than even me. The temp gauge isn't even at center at 215deg.
 

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My truck hits 215F coolant temp without a trailer. This is too warm for my liking. I couldn’t dream of towing with my ED. The Cummins trucks will get tow duty.
My truck hits 215F coolant temp without a trailer. This is too warm for my liking. I couldn’t dream of towing with my ED. The Cummins trucks will get tow duty.
Why ? Its where its designed to be. The thermostat isnt even suposed to start opening until 208 F.
 

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Why ? Its where its designed to be. The thermostat isnt even suposed to start opening until 208 F.
That 208deg F # is wrong. Not sure exactly how it's wrong, but unless a person is towing, we drive around all day with our EVIC saying 195-201deg. Our only temp reference is the EVIC and no way are we all driving around with no coolant circulating. So maybe the tstat is touching coolant that is much hotter than what the EVIC sensor is touching, I dunno, but we're missing something.
 

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Hmm. Well, you may be wired more tight on this issue than even me. The temp gauge isn't even at center at 215deg.
That 208deg F # is wrong. Not sure exactly how it's wrong, but unless a person is towing, we drive around all day with our EVIC saying 195-201deg. Our only temp reference is the EVIC and no way are we all driving around with no coolant circulating. So maybe the tstat is touching coolant that is much hotter than what the EVIC sensor is touching, I dunno, but we're missing something.
If your truck is apart and you can easily remove the t stat it would be easy to test ? Im just going by what the spec is "supposed" to be ..
 

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If your truck is apart and you can easily remove the t stat it would be easy to test ? Im just going by what the spec is "supposed" to be ..
I guess you've not been watching your EVIC temps over the last several years?

Re. what spec is supposed to be. Little more complicated than that. How precisely does the thermostat sense temp? Where is the EVIC sensor? To what extent does the material around the tstat and EVIC sensor distort the reading at different flow rates.

Re. removing tstat. Could easily be a mistake. Many tstat designs don't just impeding a coolant flow route like a valve in a pipe. Instead, they might be at the union of 3 or 4 pipes and dynamically change the route of the coolant. Pull that kind of thermostat and coolant can go any route it wants. Usually that means bypassing the radiator.
 

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That 208deg F # is wrong. Not sure exactly how it's wrong, but unless a person is towing, we drive around all day with our EVIC saying 195-201deg. Our only temp reference is the EVIC and no way are we all driving around with no coolant circulating. So maybe the tstat is touching coolant that is much hotter than what the EVIC sensor is touching, I dunno, but we're missing something.
The "I dunno" your missing is the thermostat is not a definitive on/off device, it modulates on a linear rate but the physical characteristics of the "valve" part of thermostat are non-linear. With manipulation of the thermostat spring rates, the flow allowed can be tailored to maintain specific temperature ranges.
Automotive thermostats and/or the housings have weep passages to allow a minute of coolant to pass to improve cold start up temperature control of the coolant.
 

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The "I dunno" your missing is the thermostat is not a definitive on/off device, it modulates on a linear rate but the physical characteristics of the "valve" part of thermostat are non-linear. With manipulation of the thermostat spring rates, the flow allowed can be tailored to maintain specific temperature ranges.
Automotive thermostats and/or the housings have weep passages to allow a minute of coolant to pass to improve cold start up temperature control of the coolant.
Agreed, a tstat is not an on/off device, it modulates flow within a certain temp range.

So you're saying that when I drive around town with the EVIC showing 195-199deg, a "weep passage" is providing enough coolant flow to keep the engine and turbo cool? How much coolant flow do you figure "weeping" suggests?

What the weep passages are mostly for is to allow a person to fill the coolant system w/o having to get the engine hot and bleed air out. The weep passages allow air to exit so you can keep filling. With old school tstats, it was common to drill a small hole in the top of them to create your weep passage. It's purpose: Allow filling of the cooling system w/o having to get the engine hot and bleed air out.
 

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Why ? Its where its designed to be. The thermostat isnt even suposed to start opening until 208 F.
I guess I have a bit of a jaded view of engineers. Stole a truck from the UofS College of Engineering back in my college days. Lets just say the dumb farm boys were a bit smarter...What works on paper or a computer nowadays doesn’t necessarily work in the real world. My ED has a lower payload than my wife’s Durango...IT’s supposed to be a truck! Not a car! But hey what do I know.

I’m old and cranky. Cheers.
 

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Agreed, a tstat is not an on/off device, it modulates flow within a certain temp range.

So you're saying that when I drive around town with the EVIC showing 195-199deg, a "weep passage" is providing enough coolant flow to keep the engine and turbo cool? How much coolant flow do you figure "weeping" suggests?

What the weep passages are mostly for is to allow a person to fill the coolant system w/o having to get the engine hot and bleed air out. The weep passages allow air to exit so you can keep filling. With old school tstats, it was common to drill a small hole in the top of them to create your weep passage. It's purpose: Allow filling of the cooling system w/o having to get the engine hot and bleed air out.
Your still not getting how it works even after I spelled out the what and how of a thermostat works. You need to put it all together including heat transfer of a fluid in motion. Aside from a weep passage there also another blaring design element of the thermostat I'll let you figure out unless someone else leaks the answer.
There is many forces in play within cooling system, they all have to be accounted for. Some are more apparent while others run interference.
 

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CRToney I think payload / GVWR is written by the attorneys. Engineers would say it's 7,800 on our 4th gens. Assuming neither the steer nor the drive axle exceeded 3,900.
 
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Your still not getting how it works even after I spelled out the what and how of a thermostat works. You need to put it all together including heat transfer of a fluid in motion. Aside from a weep passage there also another blaring design element of the thermostat I'll let you figure out unless someone else leaks the answer.
There is many forces in play within cooling system, they all have to be accounted for. Some are more apparent while others run interference.
Re. you're still not getting it even after I spelled it out. Maybe you didn't spell it out as clearly as you imagine.

Re. need to put it all together including the heat xfer of a fluid in motion. Ok, I'm listening. It's been some decades since I had to work thru heat transfer problems with convective flow, but I can probably still do it. So present your case.

Re. there's also another design element...I'll let you figure out. Now that's an interesting debate tactic. "I'm right because of my secret knowledge."

You're making assertions while avoiding explaining anything. If you can explain the physics behind your assertions, then lets talk about them. If you can't explain the physics behind your assertions, well, they're not going to be very compelling.
 

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I guess you've not been watching your EVIC temps over the last several years?

Re. what spec is supposed to be. Little more complicated than that. How precisely does the thermostat sense temp? Where is the EVIC sensor? To what extent does the material around the tstat and EVIC sensor distort the reading at different flow rates.

Re. removing tstat. Could easily be a mistake. Many tstat designs don't just impeding a coolant flow route like a valve in a pipe. Instead, they might be at the union of 3 or 4 pipes and dynamically change the route of the coolant. Pull that kind of thermostat and coolant can go any route it wants. Usually that means bypassing the radiator.
No, I havent " been watching my EVIC temps over the last several years: I have a Grand Cherokee and it does Not give me a "temp" only a Gauge with Cold to Hot.... LOL ! By removing the thermostat i meant that you could actually "test" the t stat in some boiling water with a thermometer. I would never suggest you ever run without a t stat in place except in some type of emergency.
 

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No, I havent " been watching my EVIC temps over the last several years: I have a Grand Cherokee and it does Not give me a "temp" only a Gauge with Cold to Hot.... LOL ! By removing the thermostat i meant that you could actually "test" the t stat in some boiling water with a thermometer. I would never suggest you ever run without a t stat in place except in some type of emergency.
Re. testing the thermostat. That's a really good thought. Gonna have to be someone else for that test tho. I've removed the tstat in the race car a couple times, trying to understand the source of this problem or that. But thats a 3min job and the EcoD tstat looks a lot harder to remove.

I'm only used to working on simple cars. Modern cars are so much more complicated. In the context of wrenching, they intimidate the shit out of me.

Removing the thermostat is old school. Our fathers would typically remove it at the first sign of over-heat. If the plumbing was simple, and it was back then, the idea did remove a flow restriction. Or if the thermostat was frozen in place, removing the tstat would fix the problem, at the expense of taking a bit longer for the engine to warm up.
 

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Re. you're still not getting it even after I spelled it out. Maybe you didn't spell it out as clearly as you imagine.

Re. need to put it all together including the heat xfer of a fluid in motion. Ok, I'm listening. It's been some decades since I had to work thru heat transfer problems with convective flow, but I can probably still do it. So present your case.

Re. there's also another design element...I'll let you figure out. Now that's an interesting debate tactic. "I'm right because of my secret knowledge."

You're making assertions while avoiding explaining anything. If you can explain the physics behind your assertions, then lets talk about them. If you can't explain the physics behind your assertions, well, they're not going to be very compelling.
You present yourself as extremely knowledgeable yet can't grab the simplicity that this is nothing more than an automotive thermostats. It's operation hasn't changed 50+ years, only it's design characteristics are made for the particular engine it's in. There is no secret knowledge, especially not for anyone that's replaced thermostat or two.
Without getting overly complicated, water conducts heat ten times faster than air. To speed up the transfer of heat even more move the water.
 

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You present yourself as extremely knowledgeable yet can't grab the simplicity that this is nothing more than an automotive thermostats. It's operation hasn't changed 50+ years, only it's design characteristics are made for the particular engine it's in. There is no secret knowledge, especially not for anyone that's replaced thermostat or two.
Without getting overly complicated, water conducts heat ten times faster than air. To speed up the transfer of heat even more move the water.
Well, I don't really know the Ram from a whole in the ground, but I'm reasonably strong in the basics.

You keep saying I'm wrong, but you're awfully vague on the specifics. If you'd make a clear point, then it could be discussed.
 

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Well, I don't really know the Ram from a whole in the ground, but I'm reasonably strong in the basics.

You keep saying I'm wrong, but you're awfully vague on the specifics. If you'd make a clear point, then it could be discussed.
It's not just me saying it, still others have gave up. There's no point of me repeating what others have stated if outcome is the same(just a hint there's another thread that has the answers), getting someone to solve the problem themselves is a better educator.
Overlooking the basics is what gets a lot of people in trouble.
 

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It's not just me saying it, still others have gave up. There's no point of me repeating what others have stated if outcome is the same(just a hint there's another thread that has the answers), getting someone to solve the problem themselves is a better educator.
Overlooking the basics is what gets a lot of people in trouble.
Re. it's not just me saying it. Saying what precisely?

Re. if outcome is the same. If outcome of what is the same?

Re. overlooking the basics. What basics, precisely?

If you'll make a specific point, I'd be happy to try to respond.
 
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