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i have yet to run into another eco in the wild. Every ram I see around here has the hemi badge.
ive had guys say your putting diesel in, thinking I was making a mistake. I say yeah it’s an eco diesel. Even had one Silverado guy say I’ve never seen a diesel with duel exhaust.
I have never had that problem with my truck, but with my wife's GC it happens all the time. More to her than me. We just reply that we saw somewhere on the internet that diesel gives better mileage and thought we would try a tank full and see. We used to have a Chevy Cruze diesel. Attendants would actually run out and try to stop us all the time. The Cruze was deleted and was an mpg beast.
 

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Reading the first email there was a three month period August, September and October of 2016 where they averaged 215 bearing failures for those three months.

Lets do a little more math on this so again in the first email they provide some percentages with one raw number of 215 per month for a three month period.

Let's work back from August, September and October 2016 and the 215 bearing failures per month.

May, June and July would have been 30% less so the average bearing failure rate would be 151 trucks per month.

January, February and March would have been 61% less than May, June and July giving us 57 trucks per month.

Now the big question is what changed in 2016 that the failure rates started going up?

FCA identified 30 grade oil film strength was not good enough and changed to a 40 grade oil, their testing revealed no emissions or fuel economy effect due to the change to the 40 grade oil. This is in the second email. So the change was made to stop using the 30 grade oil and to go forward using a 40 grade oil which they still use today in both the last of the Gen2 ecodiesels and they stuck with a 40 grade oil with the new Gen3 ecodiesel engines.

From the emails once the bearing failure rate hit 200 per month FCA took action and made a change dropping the 30 grade oil and replacing it with a 40 grade oil.

Now here is where I am suspect on dealers, they would have an inventory of 5w-30 oil to get rid of and you have to wonder how many people went to the dealer and ended up with 5w-30 oil to clear out inventory which could explain many of the 2017 and 2018 bearing failures that may have happened since the change.
 

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In the first three years of production FCA was experiencing approx. 3,000 bottom end failures per year. I don't have accurate data for MY 2017 and later.
That data can't be correct because that would come out to 250 bearing failures per month, in the emails the bearing failure rate started to go up in 2016 and maxed out at 215 per month, the months prior to the August, September and October 2016 period the failure rates were lower and when the failure rate hit 215 per month for those three months FCA took action making the change from the 30 grade oil to the 40 grade CJ-4 rated diesel oil.

The only hard numbers available are in the first email, the second email was in reference to the oil change dealing with emissions and fuel economy.

Going back to failure rate for the first 9 months of 2016 there would have been 1,269 failures using the numbers in the first email. The last two months are not mentioned but lets do a worst case on it at 215 per month for November and December that raises the total to 1,699 and the letter does not address April so lets split the difference for April and say 100 more failed for that month, that gives a total of 1,799 failures. That is 1,201 lower than the 3,000 units stated.

The change to the 40 grade oil clearly made a positive impact and you still have to account for the first three years of using the 30 grade oil and what damage had already been done by the time they changed to the 40 grade oil spec.
 

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^^^^^ We don't know anything for certain. My info is based on a reliable source though. The email only addresses failure rate (and increase %) for the MY 2016. Most failures were in MY 14 & 15
 

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Actually, every owner with an Ecodiesel that I have met has raved about their truck. Meanwhile, my brother who drives a 2017 F250 Powerstroke diesel has had it towed to the dealer countless times. Last time his DEF system failed. He said it's his last diesel. My service manager knows that my Eco is tuned, said good idea. He also said that very few Ecodiesels have failed, but when they do, it's total destruction. Obviously there is a problem, but most have been great.
 

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Actually, every owner with an Ecodiesel that I have met has raved about their truck. Meanwhile, my brother who drives a 2017 F250 Powerstroke diesel has had it towed to the dealer countless times. Last time his DEF system failed. He said it's his last diesel. My service manager knows that my Eco is tuned, said good idea. He also said that very few Ecodiesels have failed, but when they do, it's total destruction. Obviously there is a problem, but most have been great.
I think the problem was the 30 grade oil, the film strength was just not strong enough to provide proper lubrication, the whole reason manufactures have gone to these 30 grade and 20 Grade oils is to meet the EPA's fuel economy mandates.

They are now talking about a 16 grade oil, there comes a point where the oil is just to thin of a film to protect the engine.

Race engines get away with thin oils because it gives them less drag for that last 1/10 of a horse power and they only have to last for 500 to 600 miles, but a car or truck is expected to last for 100,000 miles or more.

FCA dropped the 30 grade oil and went to a 40 grade because the 40 grade has a stronger film strength to protect the bearings. When they upgraded the ecodiesel to the Gen3 they stayed with a 40 grade oil. The one thing I do question is why the move from diesel specific oil to an SN oil. Diesel specific oils were designed to deal with the byproducts of a Diesel engine verse a Gas engine. That is why the API code for Diesels started with a "C" for compression and the Gas engines API code started with a "S" for spark, the additives were different. I just don't think the SN oils will work as well as a Diesel specific oil in the long run.
 

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I think the oil spec change was more of a band aid fix. Not saying it didn't help though.
 

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Interesting

 

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Well, I've seen a few totally blown engines, and oil blowing out of the filler due to high engine pressure, and other various oil leaks from hoses and timing covers. Guys on this forum DENY that there are problems with the Gen 3 engine, I guess because they live in a bubble. Here's another just from today.

View attachment 87874
Is that a 3rd gen engine failure?
 

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At one point they were talking about making gas powered vehicles use this DEF system as well.
I think you're conflating SCR/DEF with the DPF.

Particulate emissions are indeed perceived as a problem on gasoline engines, especially those with direct (as opposed to port) injection. Particle filters on gasoline engines have become common in the EU since it's nearly impossible for direct-injection gasoline engines to meet the EU's current emissions standards without them. The same thing may happen in the US at some point as well.

However, an SCR/DEF system would make no sense at all on a gasoline engine; they simply do not produce high levels of NOx emissions that require such a system. A gasoline engine runs a stoichiometric mixture at idle and part load, and it will run sligtly rich at full loads. This is not conducive to producing NOx. NOx is formed when an engine runs on the lean side, which diesels do at anything less than full load.

BTW, no regulatory agency "makes" manufacturers use any particular technology to clean up emissions. The regulatory agencies just set standards for allowable emissions. Manufacturers are free to meet those standards in any way they wish. I'll give you an example: Way back when, I had a 1977 VW Rabbit. Almost every other car sold in the US market since the 1975 model year had a catalytic converter, but that '77 Rabbit did not. Instead, it used fuel injection when everyone else was still using carburetors. A catalytic converter wasn't required because the car was able to meet the emissions standards of the day without one (and as a side benefit, could still use the then-cheaper leaded gas).
 

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Is that a 3rd gen engine failure?
Why does everybody ask that? Yes, Gen 3. This is the Gen 3 forum section.

Go check out some owners groups on social media. It's wild what you see happen with this engines.
 
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Why does everybody ask that? Yes, Gen 3. This is the Gen 3 forum section.

Go check out some owners groups on social media. It's wild what you see happen with this engines.
I don't think 'everyone' is asking that and it appears to be a brief non-detailed tweet. No thanks on your social media offer but thanks for at least answering my question.
 

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If gen 3 engine failures are as common as Wx implies, why aren't they present on ram1500diesel.com?
 

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People ask gen 3 because of the notorious problems with the previous gens. Jury still out on the gen 3, but I like what I have. 50k on her now and I hate to turn her in. But I need the longer bed so I’ll start my high mileage test again on a new one hopefully next week when it arrives.
 
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