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Discussion Starter #1
Which improved parts readily interchange between the series? I might consider watching the salvage yards for a spare/replacement 3rd gen ecodiesel engine if enough parts would interchange. I think the turbo is supposed to be ceramic bearing and the heads are higher flow. Or if my engine grenades I could swap out the needed parts to use the 3rd Gen long block with the 2nd Gen pump and electrical sensors as needed.
 

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Long blocks are probably swappable dont think the block changed at all. New turbo is bigger but looks to mount the same . All in all I dont think there is that much differences. But a gen 3 engine wont be plug and play thats for sure.
 

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Several significant changes contribute to the new EcoDiesel’s improved dynamic and fuel economy performance.
  • A new-generation water-cooled turbocharger with variable geometry turbine (VGT) increases efficiency and responsiveness during transient conditions.
  • Redesigned cylinder head intake ports improve swirl and flow, increasing performance and fuel economy.
  • The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system design has been updated to a dual loop (low and high pressure) system. The added low-pressure circulation system draws gases after the diesel particulate filter, thus minimizing turbocharger energy losses, which increases fuel economy.
  • The compression ratio has been optimized to 16.0:1 from 16.5:1.
  • High-pressure (29,000 psi/2,000 bar) direct-injection fuel injector nozzles were redesigned to match the newly designed and optimized combustion chamber.
  • Lightweight aluminum alloy pistons were completely redesigned to include thinner rings and low-friction coating on the pin and side skirts to reduce losses.
  • NVH has been reduced by offsetting piston pin by 0.3 millimeters from the centerline; thus, minimizing mechanical noises.
  • The lower portion of the two-piece oil sump uses a lightweight sandwiched polymer/metal material that further reduces NVH.
  • The dual vacuum pump system uses electric and a new mechanical low-friction pump with new blades that improve overall system efficiency.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Gen 3 Water cooled turbo low friction with larger turbines.




Gen2




Gen2



Maserati VM diesel. Uses special design of exhaust manifold, manufactured with ultra-high strength stainless steel AISI 309, with limited weight and size. The manifold is formed by two steel layers separated by an air gap, hence the name of air gap manufacturing technology (think Yeti cup). VNT turbo with ceramic bearings. 270hp.
I notice the turbo exhaust downpipe is different. The exhaust manifolds don't have the heat shields.


Maserati Ecodiesel.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
“This new Gen 3 EcoDiesel engine shares very few components when compared to Gen 2 and does feature an updated (cam) timing gear set-up. For 0-60 times, we don’t have anything official to share,” Ram Truck spokesman Trevor Dorchies wrote.
 

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Studying the pictures of the gen-2 versus the gen-3 I can see many differences between the two. The gen -3 has different injectors, turbo & EGR set-ups just to name a few.

One of my main concerns is the mounting location of the low pressure EGR cooler & piping. This cooler at some point will need servicing & possible replacement. Without seeing it mounted in a truck, I'm wondering if the cab will need to be pulled to get to the cooler, piping or turbo charger? If I'm seeing it right, it looks like the low pressure EGR gasses will be induced into the intake pipe going into the inlet side of the turbo. This means that those exhaust gases will be sent through the charge air cooler before entering the intake manifold. I sure hope that since these gases are taken post DPF filter that they will be pretty soot free, if not they will have a lot of piping and components to plug up.
 

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Anybody know the limits of the new turbo? The old one was done at 300 HP.
 

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I'm super excited to see how the 3rd gen. engine holds up. I would trade today if I knew the 3rd gen was going to reduce soot coking and overall relaiblity increased.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Studying the pictures of the gen-2 versus the gen-3 I can see many differences between the two. The gen -3 has different injectors, turbo & EGR set-ups just to name a few.

One of my main concerns is the mounting location of the low pressure EGR cooler & piping. This cooler at some point will need servicing & possible replacement. Without seeing it mounted in a truck, I'm wondering if the cab will need to be pulled to get to the cooler, piping or turbo charger? If I'm seeing it right, it looks like the low pressure EGR gasses will be induced into the intake pipe going into the inlet side of the turbo. This means that those exhaust gases will be sent through the charge air cooler before entering the intake manifold. I sure hope that since these gases are taken post DPF filter that they will be pretty soot free, if not they will have a lot of piping and components to plug up.
I think many of the large diesels have low pressure EGR, the new 3.0 Duramax also has low pressure EGR. Should be as clean as the tip of your tailpipe. My concern is heat stress on the EGR cooler, intercooler, and pipes with the post DPF temps after a regeneration or towing. As noted it looks like the EGR would require cab removal if it starts to leak or for those that live in non-EPA countries for off road use who want to delete the system.
 

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I think many of the large diesels have low pressure EGR, the new 3.0 Duramax also has low pressure EGR. Should be as clean as the tip of your tailpipe. My concern is heat stress on the EGR cooler, intercooler, and pipes with the post DPF temps after a regeneration or towing. As noted it looks like the EGR would require cab removal if it starts to leak or for those that live in non-EPA countries for off road use who want to delete the system.
Since i am a little "slow" ... does that mean a delete would be a bit complicated concerning the removal of all that equipment?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Since i am a little "slow" ... does that mean a delete would be a bit complicated concerning the removal of all that equipment?
Deleting the low pressure EGR might require lifting the truck cab off, as that the current method for turbo replacement. Plus the CARB and EPA is cracking down on engine tuners, so there may not be any USA tuners for deleting off-road vehicles.
 

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People like Vern have done full deletes on their Ecodiesels. That is a major reason they run so long and so clean with good performance and economy. Many take those high mileage vehicles and tout how good the Ecodiesel can be. The are right if you remember they are deleted. Now surely there might be someone with a stock vehicle with higher mileage.

Every once in a while a blind squirrel finds an acorn.

If the 2020 cannot be reasonably easy to delete, forget it.
 

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If the 2020 cannot be reasonably easy to delete, forget it.
Let's see how the new low pressure EGR system works before we completely count out the 2020 Ecodiesel. I also want to hear some feedback from GDE on tuning options.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I highly doubt that any turbo engine with EGR, gas or diesel, will be trouble free for 150,000 miles. Two coolers is twice the chance for coolant leaks.

Does the new EcoD have any improvements on the CCV system?
 

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Well nice to see all the updates they made to the gen 3.. But crank sensor still in the bell housing🤔??? You would think by now they figure that one out...
 
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