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I'm no expert. I just did a few engine rebuilds and also did do what this guy has done: bought a 2015 Ram 1500 Eco with seized engine in hopes of rebuilding it. Issue I ran into is if I am to turn the block and crank, I can not find an oversized bearings to put it back together. Only ones I found we're of unknown quality shipped from Romania. So I bit the bullet, got a new engine into my truck, and now have extra Eco 3.0L motor sitting in my shop.
My findings were very similar to that of the video, except bearings were melted worse, and journals were plugged with that same material bearings are made of.
Bearings definitely got hot because of lack of lubrication, and in my opinion, because I saw the inside of the motor, that lack of lubrication is due to oil being diluted with soot.
10k interval for oil change is too much for this engine, it has to be at least cut in half.
It's like pumping fine grit into the engine and expecting oil to not become jello.
 

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First, I hope he does follow up videos on the rebuild. That will be really interesting.

So I am no mechanic but I wonder if what he is showing is the cause or the effect. Is the oil hole plugged with melted bearing material (effect) or did the blockage come from something else which starved the bearing of oil (cause). I assume he would have to dig out some of the material and have it tested.

I have always wondered if the failures were due to the 60degree V vs 90degree. Or if it had to do with improper assembly at the manufacturer. I thought I had read that each bearing is color coded and has to be installed in the proper location. Or the "environmentally friendly" bearing material itself is just no good. Just guessing here.

I dont think it is a soot issue, even though I agree that the egr is no good for these engines. Too many members on this forum have done 10k mile oil changes with the analysis showing no significant soot in the oil. Also too many engines have "let go" with very little miles on them. Suggesting poor quality control at the manufacturer.

On the flip side with have engines now with over 200-300k miles on them and still going strong. So who knows.
 

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From my understanding Yes it was disassembled and inspected by GDE, Their findings a partially spun main Bearing ...
The engine was on it’s way out ....

I believe Vern unaware and ran his coolant low ,(leaking EGR? ) Apparently made his head gaskets cook a little not realizing low on coolant ... A engine that overheats eventually will blow head gaskets and spin Bearings.... Common mechanical knowledge....
 

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Bearings definitely got hot because of lack of lubrication, and in my opinion, because I saw the inside of the motor, that lack of lubrication is due to oil being diluted with soot.
10k interval for oil change is too much for this engine, it has to be at least cut in half.
It's like pumping fine grit into the engine and expecting oil to not become jello.
Pages and pages of oil analysis from members of this forum would suggest otherwise and the vast majority of motors would fail/have failed by now. Instead, just a small percentage of engines fail this way.
 

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Pages and pages of oil analysis from members of this forum would suggest otherwise and the vast majority of motors would fail/have failed by now. Instead, just a small percentage of engines fail this way.
That's the thing about opinions: they are like noses - every body's got one, usually got a couple of holes in it.
I have torn apart an engine, seen it on the inside. Oil analysis will not prevent an engine from dying, merely a snapshot of what has happened, not what will happen.

These are all armchair diagnostics here, simply opinions. Bad design? Maybe. Inferior materials? Potentially. European engine for US market incompatibility? Most likely.
Why would FCA change oil spec mid production without doing anything to the design of the engine? Most likely the engine was designed not to run as hot as it does, with all close tolerances of modern engines it can not dissipate heat fast enough, poor lubricity and one gets spun bearing.
 

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That's the thing about opinions: they are like noses - every body's got one, usually got a couple of holes in it.
I have torn apart an engine, seen it on the inside. Oil analysis will not prevent an engine from dying, merely a snapshot of what has happened, not what will happen.

These are all armchair diagnostics here, simply opinions. Bad design? Maybe. Inferior materials? Potentially. European engine for US market incompatibility? Most likely.
Why would FCA change oil spec mid production without doing anything to the design of the engine? Most likely the engine was designed not to run as hot as it does, with all close tolerances of modern engines it can not dissipate heat fast enough, poor lubricity and one gets spun bearing.
I tend to agree that with the oil analysis, the 10k mile interval is not an issue.... for a properly functioning truck! Problem is something in the emissions system can go on the fritz and all of a sudden you have more soot or more fuel in the oil and then you have problems.
 

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That's the thing about opinions: they are like noses - every body's got one, usually got a couple of holes in it.
I have torn apart an engine, seen it on the inside. Oil analysis will not prevent an engine from dying, merely a snapshot of what has happened, not what will happen.

These are all armchair diagnostics here, simply opinions. Bad design? Maybe. Inferior materials? Potentially. European engine for US market incompatibility? Most likely.
Why would FCA change oil spec mid production without doing anything to the design of the engine? Most likely the engine was designed not to run as hot as it does, with all close tolerances of modern engines it can not dissipate heat fast enough, poor lubricity and one gets spun bearing.
No holes in an oil analysis. It gets tested and noted how much of the additive package and other items are still present. That's what matters. You are right about it not protecting the engine, but it will give you an idea of your oils health and one can then make an educated decision after that. Your first post alluded to the need of shorter intervals between oil changes because of soot. Now you are talking about heat being the problem. What oil you use wont help with soot any. I personally believe that soot is the problem. Like you said it can build up and plug a oil galley which would then starve and spin a bearing. Not the oil breaking down on its own starving and spinning the bearing. Soot build up can happen in an engine just like calcium build up happens in our bodies. It gets trapped in a corner or crevice and then builds up. At some point it breaks free and ends up getting lodged somewhere else. Plugging a galley and either wiping out a bearing or causing a stroke. Changing your oil at 1000 miles or 100000 miles wont change that. The stuck soot didn't get flushed out and will continue to build with the fresh oil delivering it. I believe it's luck of the draw. We see that with tuned Eco's. They don't have soot issues and I have yet to hear of a spun bearing failure in a tuned engine. I do know for a fact that tuned engines still get hot yet they keep on going.

Those are my opinions. Where are the holes?
 

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I cant put my hand on any of them, but there have been tuned trucks with egr turned off that failed. GDE themselves said if you have one thats going to fail the tune isnt going to stop it. I dont know if they still believe/stand behind that statement or not, but they posted it somewhere on here. I tend to have faith in what they say.
 

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Oil analysis is not an opinion. It's in the name - analysis.
What I was referring to as a "soot buildup" and "heat" are a common knowledge that clean oil will be able to cool and lube better than dirty oil. Yes, oil can absorb a lot of material and still provide adequate protections, but it diminishes as more material is intoduced.
I somehow feel that all the issues with emissions equipment, coupled with changing oil spec mid-production could point to the fact that this engine was not designed with that equipment in mind, it was an add on to comply with regulations. And the main addition to engine itself is EGR, which introduces soot back into the engine and is a draw on cooling system. Rest of components are on exhaust pipe. So I stand by my opinion that soot is to blame.
Early failures of these engines could be quality control issues, but number of total failures are within the percentage of what manufacturer could expect.
I'm not here to win or loose a pissing match, just sharing. I did read a lot of this forum, I did replace a dead engine by myself, which is more than most members here. I did tear into my old Eco, saw what it looks like on inside, therefore I believe what I say. Could just be this one engine I have, but so is any of other members of this community, just armchair diagnostics.
 
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