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I'm no expert. I just did a few engine rebuilds and also did do what this guy has done: bought a 2015 Ram 1500 Eco with seized engine in hopes of rebuilding it. Issue I ran into is if I am to turn the block and crank, I can not find an oversized bearings to put it back together. Only ones I found we're of unknown quality shipped from Romania. So I bit the bullet, got a new engine into my truck, and now have extra Eco 3.0L motor sitting in my shop.
My findings were very similar to that of the video, except bearings were melted worse, and journals were plugged with that same material bearings are made of.
Bearings definitely got hot because of lack of lubrication, and in my opinion, because I saw the inside of the motor, that lack of lubrication is due to oil being diluted with soot.
10k interval for oil change is too much for this engine, it has to be at least cut in half.
It's like pumping fine grit into the engine and expecting oil to not become jello.
 

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First, I hope he does follow up videos on the rebuild. That will be really interesting.

So I am no mechanic but I wonder if what he is showing is the cause or the effect. Is the oil hole plugged with melted bearing material (effect) or did the blockage come from something else which starved the bearing of oil (cause). I assume he would have to dig out some of the material and have it tested.

I have always wondered if the failures were due to the 60degree V vs 90degree. Or if it had to do with improper assembly at the manufacturer. I thought I had read that each bearing is color coded and has to be installed in the proper location. Or the "environmentally friendly" bearing material itself is just no good. Just guessing here.

I dont think it is a soot issue, even though I agree that the egr is no good for these engines. Too many members on this forum have done 10k mile oil changes with the analysis showing no significant soot in the oil. Also too many engines have "let go" with very little miles on them. Suggesting poor quality control at the manufacturer.

On the flip side with have engines now with over 200-300k miles on them and still going strong. So who knows.
 

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From my understanding Yes it was disassembled and inspected by GDE, Their findings a partially spun main Bearing ...
The engine was on it’s way out ....

I believe Vern unaware and ran his coolant low ,(leaking EGR? ) Apparently made his head gaskets cook a little not realizing low on coolant ... A engine that overheats eventually will blow head gaskets and spin Bearings.... Common mechanical knowledge....
 

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Bearings definitely got hot because of lack of lubrication, and in my opinion, because I saw the inside of the motor, that lack of lubrication is due to oil being diluted with soot.
10k interval for oil change is too much for this engine, it has to be at least cut in half.
It's like pumping fine grit into the engine and expecting oil to not become jello.
Pages and pages of oil analysis from members of this forum would suggest otherwise and the vast majority of motors would fail/have failed by now. Instead, just a small percentage of engines fail this way.
 

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Pages and pages of oil analysis from members of this forum would suggest otherwise and the vast majority of motors would fail/have failed by now. Instead, just a small percentage of engines fail this way.
That's the thing about opinions: they are like noses - every body's got one, usually got a couple of holes in it.
I have torn apart an engine, seen it on the inside. Oil analysis will not prevent an engine from dying, merely a snapshot of what has happened, not what will happen.

These are all armchair diagnostics here, simply opinions. Bad design? Maybe. Inferior materials? Potentially. European engine for US market incompatibility? Most likely.
Why would FCA change oil spec mid production without doing anything to the design of the engine? Most likely the engine was designed not to run as hot as it does, with all close tolerances of modern engines it can not dissipate heat fast enough, poor lubricity and one gets spun bearing.
 

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That's the thing about opinions: they are like noses - every body's got one, usually got a couple of holes in it.
I have torn apart an engine, seen it on the inside. Oil analysis will not prevent an engine from dying, merely a snapshot of what has happened, not what will happen.

These are all armchair diagnostics here, simply opinions. Bad design? Maybe. Inferior materials? Potentially. European engine for US market incompatibility? Most likely.
Why would FCA change oil spec mid production without doing anything to the design of the engine? Most likely the engine was designed not to run as hot as it does, with all close tolerances of modern engines it can not dissipate heat fast enough, poor lubricity and one gets spun bearing.
I tend to agree that with the oil analysis, the 10k mile interval is not an issue.... for a properly functioning truck! Problem is something in the emissions system can go on the fritz and all of a sudden you have more soot or more fuel in the oil and then you have problems.
 

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That's the thing about opinions: they are like noses - every body's got one, usually got a couple of holes in it.
I have torn apart an engine, seen it on the inside. Oil analysis will not prevent an engine from dying, merely a snapshot of what has happened, not what will happen.

These are all armchair diagnostics here, simply opinions. Bad design? Maybe. Inferior materials? Potentially. European engine for US market incompatibility? Most likely.
Why would FCA change oil spec mid production without doing anything to the design of the engine? Most likely the engine was designed not to run as hot as it does, with all close tolerances of modern engines it can not dissipate heat fast enough, poor lubricity and one gets spun bearing.
No holes in an oil analysis. It gets tested and noted how much of the additive package and other items are still present. That's what matters. You are right about it not protecting the engine, but it will give you an idea of your oils health and one can then make an educated decision after that. Your first post alluded to the need of shorter intervals between oil changes because of soot. Now you are talking about heat being the problem. What oil you use wont help with soot any. I personally believe that soot is the problem. Like you said it can build up and plug a oil galley which would then starve and spin a bearing. Not the oil breaking down on its own starving and spinning the bearing. Soot build up can happen in an engine just like calcium build up happens in our bodies. It gets trapped in a corner or crevice and then builds up. At some point it breaks free and ends up getting lodged somewhere else. Plugging a galley and either wiping out a bearing or causing a stroke. Changing your oil at 1000 miles or 100000 miles wont change that. The stuck soot didn't get flushed out and will continue to build with the fresh oil delivering it. I believe it's luck of the draw. We see that with tuned Eco's. They don't have soot issues and I have yet to hear of a spun bearing failure in a tuned engine. I do know for a fact that tuned engines still get hot yet they keep on going.

Those are my opinions. Where are the holes?
 

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I cant put my hand on any of them, but there have been tuned trucks with egr turned off that failed. GDE themselves said if you have one thats going to fail the tune isnt going to stop it. I dont know if they still believe/stand behind that statement or not, but they posted it somewhere on here. I tend to have faith in what they say.
 

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Oil analysis is not an opinion. It's in the name - analysis.
What I was referring to as a "soot buildup" and "heat" are a common knowledge that clean oil will be able to cool and lube better than dirty oil. Yes, oil can absorb a lot of material and still provide adequate protections, but it diminishes as more material is intoduced.
I somehow feel that all the issues with emissions equipment, coupled with changing oil spec mid-production could point to the fact that this engine was not designed with that equipment in mind, it was an add on to comply with regulations. And the main addition to engine itself is EGR, which introduces soot back into the engine and is a draw on cooling system. Rest of components are on exhaust pipe. So I stand by my opinion that soot is to blame.
Early failures of these engines could be quality control issues, but number of total failures are within the percentage of what manufacturer could expect.
I'm not here to win or loose a pissing match, just sharing. I did read a lot of this forum, I did replace a dead engine by myself, which is more than most members here. I did tear into my old Eco, saw what it looks like on inside, therefore I believe what I say. Could just be this one engine I have, but so is any of other members of this community, just armchair diagnostics.
 

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2017 Laramie eco about to be tuned and deleted at 30k. Forget that it’s now hp tuned and deleted.
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[QUOTE="KRom, post: 1033887, member:
I did replace a dead engine by myself, which is more than most members here. I did tear into my old Eco, saw what it looks like on inside,
[/QUOTE]
This carries a lot of weight with me. I respect that you did that on your own, kudos. I spent many years doing oil analysis on 6000 hp plus engines which almost never changed the oil unless you had fuel dilution. The oil was cleaned by banks of purifiers/centrifuges. Very common on ships for 2-4000 gallon sumps. The oil was heavily sooted as we would all be black for days after being in crank cases inspecting main bearings. There was never coking or plugging anywhere. it all stayed suspended. The oil analysis normally came back good. Mostly you look for trends in wear by particulate rise. With an ecodiesel, you may have good oil analysis but the excess soot is building in areas where it’s not staying in suspension.
is it because there isn’t enough mass to disperse localized heat? Is it too small of oil passages? Was it the wrong oil for the application? I think the engine packing a lot of hp in a small lightweight engine with possible linebore issues and the wrong oil in the beginning might be part of the problem if not all of it.
Point is, oil analysis doesn’t tell you the whole story. It tell you how far you are from baseline and what is wearing. That’s with the assumption baseline is correct as in the right oil for the application.
However you slice it, this engine has presented a fascinating enigma which will be solved someday.
it’s going to take a study of many failed engines in a row which I can guarantee has been done by FCA but we will never see it. 😂
 

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With an ecodiesel, you may have good oil analysis but the excess soot is building in areas where it’s not staying in suspension.
In an email exchange with GDE, he made a very interesting comment.

"For those with an open mind...cleaner engine oil will improve engine longevity. Soot is abrasive and speeds component wear on bearings, etc.”

I'm now considering installing a by-pass filter.
 
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Biodiesel, Save your money,A bypass filter is not going to be much help with a Modern Diesel spinning bearings.. The problem isn’t soot percentages or bigger soot particles which the bypass filter is designed to catch after Factory oil filtration .. Now I installed hundreds of bypass filters on City diesels in the 80’s and 90’s which was necessary...

The problem is the EGR Along with lower combustion temperatures to lower NOX gas vs old Diesel engines design’s ..

The EGR / Lower combustion chamber temperature’s are only partially burning the minerals in the fuel , these extremely small particles 1-2 microns are heat/ pressure treated and keep passing thru the oil filter causing scaring /wear on bearings ..

This is a Very complicated situation, It comes down to where the oil is sourced aka oil wells which ones produce higher minerals, types of minerals and refiners Along with cold weather starts Ect...

These extremely small partially burnt hardened particles of minerals are known as engine killers by Cummins, Ask GDE....

Why do you think some folks have blown 2-3 engines and others have not ? Location,Location,Location.....Or Really Really Really Bad Luck?

Do you still believe in bad engine assemblies ?

If the original EcoDiesel engine didn’t have a bad environmental characteristic , would FCA designed a new engine if it was as simple as bad assembly practices wouldn’t FCA just retrain the engine builders?

I removed my EcoDiesel’s exhaust and started my engine, Just to watch what others have posted on our site, The exhaust was a solid black soot , Which is unburnt fuel then pumped back in to the engine... Again crude oil / Diesel Fuel contains Minerals...

Simply put house water wells vary dramatically with different minerals and contents from different geographical locations... Oil is no different......
 

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2017 Laramie eco about to be tuned and deleted at 30k. Forget that it’s now hp tuned and deleted.
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Biodiesel, Save your money,A bypass filter is not going to be much help with a Modern Diesel spinning bearings.. The problem isn’t soot percentages or bigger soot particles which the bypass filter is designed to catch after Factory oil filtration .. Now I installed hundreds of bypass filters on City diesels in the 80’s and 90’s which was necessary...

The problem is the EGR Along with lower combustion temperatures to lower NOX gas vs old Diesel engines design’s ..

The EGR / Lower combustion chamber temperature’s are only partially burning the minerals in the fuel , these extremely small particles 1-2 microns are heat/ pressure treated and keep passing thru the oil filter causing scaring /wear on bearings ..

This is a Very complicated situation, It comes down to where the oil is sourced aka oil wells which ones produce higher minerals, types of minerals and refiners Along with cold weather starts Ect...

These extremely small partially burnt hardened particles of minerals are known as engine killers by Cummins, Ask GDE....

Why do you think some folks have blown 2-3 engines and others have not ? Location,Location,Location.....Or Really Really Really Bad Luck?

Do you still believe in bad engine assemblies ?

If the original EcoDiesel engine didn’t have a bad environmental characteristic , would FCA designed a new engine if it was as simple as bad assembly practices wouldn’t FCA just retrain the engine builders?

I removed my EcoDiesel’s exhaust and started my engine, Just to watch what others have posted on our site, The exhaust was a solid black soot , Which is unburnt fuel then pumped back in to the engine... Again crude oil / Diesel Fuel contains Minerals...

Simply put house water wells vary dramatically with different minerals and contents from different geographical locations... Oil is no different......
Great comment. The only problem I have is 1 micron is extremely small. A human hair is 50-100 micron. You filter down to 1/2 micron and you take out dye and additives. I unwittingly did that with a huge hydraulic system in the quest for ideal filtration methods.

I don’t know what the micron clearance of the bearing to crank is off the top of my head but it’s relatively large. In the area of 1300 microns if it is .050” Will soot wear bearings? Sure, over extended periods of time. Not in the first 50,000 miles. You would expect to see normal bearing wear down in a few hundred to 500k especially on mains. Even then not catastrophic. As long as you have oil pressure you should be able to run on very worn bearings indefinitely until it leaks so bad you lose your oil wedge. The cylinders, valves and rod bearings will show wear way before the mains. I think there is something else going on. Egr doesn’t help anything and makes things worse but it’s not the reason mains are failing. At least not the sole reason IMO
 

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Biodiesel, Save your money,A bypass filter is not going to be much help with a Modern Diesel spinning bearings..
I wasn't installing a by-pass to prevent spun bearings. I was going to install a by-pass to improve engine longevity. GDE has seen many EcoDiesel engines tore down. He believes that cleaner oil will improve engine longevity.

The EGR / Lower combustion chamber temperature’s are only partially burning the minerals in the fuel , these extremely small particles 1-2 microns are heat/ pressure treated and keep passing thru the oil filter causing scaring /wear on bearings ..
Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't most engine wear happen with contaminates that are 4 micron or larger? A by-pass filter can filter down to 1 micron, so in essence, it is removing wear contaminants that the full-flow filter won't remove.

This is a Very complicated situation, It comes down to where the oil is sourced aka oil wells which ones produce higher minerals, types of minerals and refiners Along with cold weather starts Ect...
Interesting theory.

.
These extremely small partially burnt hardened particles of minerals are known as engine killers by Cummins, Ask GDE....
I did ask GDE. He said, "For those with an open mind...cleaner engine oil will improve engine longevity. Soot is abrasive and speeds component wear on bearings, etc.”
 

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I think there is something else going on. Egr doesn’t help anything and makes things worse but it’s not the reason mains are failing. At least not the sole reason IMO
I agree. There were lots of engine failures with under 30,000 miles and some with less than 10,000 miles.

From my understanding, poor factory tuning might be as bad as EGR. With that said, there are stock tuned EcoDiesels with 300,000+ miles. Even GDE advertises improved combustion efficiency, less soot formation, reduced soot loading, less regens, and extended service intervals with his EPA Compliant Tune (EGR intact).
 

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In my opinion, it's the lead free bearings and the fuel we run which runs at a lower cetane changing the combustion properties. to me it's kinda like running a gasser that should be on race fuel and filling it with 87.
 

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In my opinion, it's the lead free bearings and the fuel we run which runs at a lower cetane changing the combustion properties. to me it's kinda like running a gasser that should be on race fuel and filling it with 87.
I wish it were that easy. But just in case you're right, I'll keep running biodiesel blends and a fuel additive. (y)
 
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