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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone done any investigatin to see whether or not you can install an exhaust brake on the Ecodiesel? I would love having that instead of having to down shift or use my brake pads excessively.
 

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It might be possible that some different programming could use the turbo for exhaust braking. Not sure how effective it would be on this setup but it would give some engine braking. It works on the cummins why not on this engine.
 

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OK... there would be a "Cool" factor to it. But the reason it wasn't done from the factory is because these are light-duty trucks. The regular brakes should stop us just fine. Besides... the trans will shift aggressively while in "Tow-haul" mode... and it will drag your speed on long hills pretty good, without using the service brakes.
 

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The exhaust brake is one of the features I know that I will miss from my 2500. Theres nothing like coming down a long steep grade while towing and never have to touch the brakes. I doubt we'll ever see one built for the EcoD.
 

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For the amount of weight these trucks are rated to pull, I dout there will even be an engine brake designed for it
 

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I'm with hillbilli, it's just not enough load (as spec'd out) to warrant anything over the truck's brakes. Hopefully supplemented by 'real' trailers with their own decent brakes but I know some smaller or homebuilts have no brakes.
 

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This truck needs an exhaust brake. I live in the mountains in California and have smoked my brakes several times driving the moderately steep and twisting roads here. I had the truck in Tow/Haul mode and down shifted appropriately, even in 4 low and still there isn't enough engine braking to keep this truck under a decent speed. I really hope there is an after market answer to this problem soon. I can't even begin to think about towing a trailer in the mountains around here until a better braking option becomes available.
 

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Trivia: Jake Brakes is a trademark of Jacobs Vehicle Systems and everybody else has to refer to their product as engine brakes or exhaust brakes. Shucks, there was once a country music artist who called his band Jake Brake and the All-Trucker Band. Jacobs sued him--after sending several cease and desist letters which were ignored--and won. He was interviewed about it in a trucking publication that I cannot remember and acknowledged that he received the letters and ignored them.
 

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Banks has a product called SpeedBrake, anyone who has interest should certainly be interested in that. It compliments the VGT you have in this truck and is the fraction of the cost of a true exhaust brake. Contact them and let them know there's a market.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I live in a very hilly area in hawaii and the exhaust brake would be great to have. I down shift but the truck continues to accelerate to point where I end up having to ride my brakes in order to keep a reasonable speed.
Does anybody know a reasonable range to push the Rpms without putting excessive stress on the engine? When the truck down shifts automatically for engine braking it will reach 3500rpm before auto shifting to the next gear, but when I manually down shift, the engine will continue to climb past 3500rpm, but I always manually shift up because I am fearful of stressing the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
trailer brake is more than enough for this trucks
This really has nothing to do with the trailer brake being sufficient enough. It's more about being able to slow the truck down while driving steep grades, and not having to ride the brakes because down shifting isn't slowing the truck sufficiently.

Although braking with a heavy load would be a benefit, even if it is not necessary.
 

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The posters above who talk about riding their brakes down long grades are doing it wrong. The recommended method is to apply the brakes in short intervals, but hard enough to drop your speed. Then release the brakes to allow them to cool while your speed increases again, when necessary apply the brakes again and repeat until you reach the bottom of the hill. I found this technique to be effective when towing a 16,500 pound 5th wheel with a Ram 3500 CTD with an exhaust brake. It is equally effective on my new Ram 1500 ED towing a 6500 pound travel trailer.

IMO, if you really need a Jake Brake, you really need a 2500.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The posters above who talk about riding their brakes down long grades are doing it wrong. The recommended method is to apply the brakes in short intervals, but hard enough to drop your speed. Then release the brakes to allow them to cool while your speed increases again, when necessary apply the brakes again and repeat until you reach the bottom of the hill. I found this technique to be effective when towing a 16,500 pound 5th wheel with a Ram 3500 CTD with an exhaust brake. It is equally effective on my new Ram 1500 ED towing a 6500 pound travel trailer.

IMO, if you really need a Jake Brake, you really need a 2500.
Sorry for the confusion but, that is what I mean when talking about "riding the brakes". I'm braking correctly, I pump my brakes as taught in school. I do not hold my foot on the brake. I didn't think it was necessary to explain that. But try keeping 30mph down a steep grade for 4 miles by pumping your brakes all the way down. Your brakes will still heat up to much or start smoking. This is the predicament I face every day. My wife has a Hyundai Accent and she can pump her brakes all the way down the hill with no consequence because her car is light enough for her brakes to manage. The same cannot be said for my Ecodiesel.
 

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I agree 100% this thing needs a exhaust brake and told ram about it in my questioner. coming out of a cummins with it and living in the mountains of north Georgia I noticed right off the bat that you had to brake real hard to slow it down. the ed has the rolling resistance of a steel ball on a pane of glass I noticed it the first day not slowing down when I came to a stop sign and let off the go pedal 150yds before I got to it, still had to step hard on the brakes to stop it. but that's how we get 38mpg out of it ! I recon the brake pad mfg's are going to love those of us in mountainous areas.
 

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I miss how quickly my 2500 would warm up with the exhaust brake on. Thing sounded like a jet at idle when the vanes were closed too.

I'd be curious how well this engine would handle the increased back and cylinder pressures. Wonder if the egr valve is set up to relieve the pressure like it is on the 6.7 cummins. If not, a hot side bov is easy enough to add.
 

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The VM 3.0 truly lacks sufficient engine braking because it's a diesel. Diesels lack a throttle plate to close and create a restriction to slow the engine. An exhaust brake would be welcome to anyone towing or even not towing if the inclines are long and steep enough. Its all relative. The 2500 is larger and tows more with bigger engine and brakes. The 1500 tows a respectable amount for its size and equipment and on a long incline, can place a serious stress on the brakes or push the motor past redline. Neither is desirable.
 
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