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Discussion Starter #1
So I am quite impressed with how the OEM brakes have worked out for me but its getting time to replace them.
Every when putting on winter tires I remove the brakes and clean them up and relube them I am just about at 150,000km on the truck (2016) with the factory brakes still but its getting time soon. They do have some wear left but at least one rotor is showing signs of that it is slightly warped. I would like to change all 4 corners this fall but I need some help deciding on what to use for hardware. Or best place to shop.
I am sort of leaning towards going to the dealer for the hardware to see if I can get the same life out of them. But if I can find out who makes the OEM stuff I can do that direction as well. I was also thinking of the EBC stuff but douth it will last as long.
I would also like to upgrade the flex lines to braided stainless at the time, I have done this with other cars trucks I own and the pedal feel is greatly improved. I just don't know where to get them if anyone makes them or where to find them.
Anyone care to share experiences?
I am also from Canada
 

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So I am quite impressed with how the OEM brakes have worked out for me but its getting time to replace them.
Every when putting on winter tires I remove the brakes and clean them up and relube them I am just about at 150,000km on the truck (2016) with the factory brakes still but its getting time soon. They do have some wear left but at least one rotor is showing signs of that it is slightly warped. I would like to change all 4 corners this fall but I need some help deciding on what to use for hardware. Or best place to shop.
I am sort of leaning towards going to the dealer for the hardware to see if I can get the same life out of them. But if I can find out who makes the OEM stuff I can do that direction as well. I was also thinking of the EBC stuff but douth it will last as long.
I would also like to upgrade the flex lines to braided stainless at the time, I have done this with other cars trucks I own and the pedal feel is greatly improved. I just don't know where to get them if anyone makes them or where to find them.
Anyone care to share experiences?
I am also from Canada
Factory brakes usually do last longer than anything you can buy from auto parts stores. That being said some auto parts store do lifetime warranty on the pads. When they wear out, take them back and they will give you a new set.

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I installed the PowerStop brake kit on the front and rear and while I thought the truck stopped fine before, it’s better now. This is the 3 time I have used PowerStop brakes and I’ve always had the same results. My 2012 R/T Durango is next!

And make sure you follow the break-in procedure for the brakes


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I have used EBC for years, they grab better than OEM and last as long if not longer.


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So I am quite impressed with how the OEM brakes have worked out for me but its getting time to replace them.
Every when putting on winter tires I remove the brakes and clean them up and relube them I am just about at 150,000km on the truck (2016) with the factory brakes still but its getting time soon. They do have some wear left but at least one rotor is showing signs of that it is slightly warped. I would like to change all 4 corners this fall but I need some help deciding on what to use for hardware. Or best place to shop.
I am sort of leaning towards going to the dealer for the hardware to see if I can get the same life out of them. But if I can find out who makes the OEM stuff I can do that direction as well. I was also thinking of the EBC stuff but douth it will last as long.
I would also like to upgrade the flex lines to braided stainless at the time, I have done this with other cars trucks I own and the pedal feel is greatly improved. I just don't know where to get them if anyone makes them or where to find them.
Anyone care to share experiences?
I am also from Canada
For me, I'm a after market kind of guy. I've used the Power Stop dimpled/slotted rotors and EBS pads. That's 3xs on one of my trucks and now onece on the Ram. This last round I couldn't afford the EBS, so power stop all four ways. AWESOME! Great stopping.

Remember, all brakes follow the break in rules. Follow this for any brake pads, shoes, rotors, and drums. The key is not letting the brake and rotor to initially 'match' when hot.

https://www.powerstop.com/brake-pad-break-in-procedure/

Let me know if I can help... Long time fighter jet mech... Longer time shade tree mech..

Thanks STKR



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Discussion Starter #7
Has anyone upgraded the brake lines?
I have experience working with aggressive pads but find they are very hard on rotors. I use carboteh AX6 on my car they are very very good for braking but I go though 2 sets of rotors for each set of pads. I don't need to go there with the truck.
 

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Well I just did the brakes on all four corners of my "15",
she has a bit over 76,000 miles on her.
The brakes hadn't worn evenly the drivers side front was completly gone on the inside pad,
not even a 1/16th of an inch of pad.
Replaced pads and rotors the fronts were easy to do,
the rears were a royal pain in the butt.
Had to put the pads in the mount before it was installed on the truck,
and it is ridiculous to have two different size bolt heads holding the calipers and the caliper mounts.
The front calipers took a 13mm, the rear calipers a 10mm.
The caliper mounting hats on the front took a 21mm or 13/16th socket the rears a 20mm.
Didn't go real fancy with the pads and rotors got them from RockAuto;
used Power Stop Z16 Evolution Clean Ride Ceramic pads and Power Stop Evolution Geomet® Coated Rotors.
The brakes do feel much better then they did,
can't say they are better then stock or not it's been to long to recall how they were when new.
 

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Well I just did the brakes on all four corners of my "15",
she has a bit over 76,000 miles on her.
The brakes hadn't worn evenly the drivers side front was completly gone on the inside pad,
not even a 1/16th of an inch of pad.
Replaced pads and rotors the fronts were easy to do,
the rears were a royal pain in the butt.
Had to put the pads in the mount before it was installed on the truck,
and it is ridiculous to have two different size bolt heads holding the calipers and the caliper mounts.
The front calipers took a 13mm, the rear calipers a 10mm.
The caliper mounting hats on the front took a 21mm or 13/16th socket the rears a 20mm.
Didn't go real fancy with the pads and rotors got them from RockAuto;
used Power Stop Z16 Evolution Clean Ride Ceramic pads and Power Stop Evolution Geomet Coated Rotors.
The brakes do feel much better then they did,
can't say they are better then stock or not it's been to long to recall how they were when new.
Lou,

If I can help, there are different sizes between front and rear. The front take way more use (abuse) than the rears. That's why the front bolts are larger. Placing the pads in the brackets first is typically. This is common due to the mech probably not compressing the caliper enough. Most of the time, with the caliper hanging (with support) we use a c-clamp to finish compressing the caliper. For most applications, we don't typically worry too much, we place the pads in the brackets like you.

Also, pads that are wearing unevenly, are signs of many things. A bad caliper... While you can determine which, better to replace both, fronts at first. Another sign is just over abuse, nope you're not doing anything wrong... Just maybe, you're hauling too heavy loads. Then pressing harder to stop than typical.

My humble advice, the improved brakes and rotors, new calipers (front). Then I'm a huge fan of proper break in of all brakes and rotors. This really needs completed before any miles are put on the new parts. For now, you'd have to remove everything, light sanding of the new pads and rotors. Then follow break in as I've given a link a prior post.

Either way, you might need to check (500 miles) the unevenly wear of the pads.

Holler if I can help... What you have, you can drive with confidence.
 

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Lou,

If I can help, there are different sizes between front and rear. The front take way more use (abuse) than the rears. That's why the front bolts are larger. Placing the pads in the brackets first is typically. This is common due to the mech probably not compressing the caliper enough. Most of the time, with the caliper hanging (with support) we use a c-clamp to finish compressing the caliper. For most applications, we don't typically worry too much, we place the pads in the brackets like you.

Also, pads that are wearing unevenly, are signs of many things. A bad caliper... While you can determine which, better to replace both, fronts at first. Another sign is just over abuse, nope you're not doing anything wrong... Just maybe, you're hauling too heavy loads. Then pressing harder to stop than typical.

My humble advice, the improved brakes and rotors, new calipers (front). Then I'm a huge fan of proper break in of all brakes and rotors. This really needs completed before any miles are put on the new parts. For now, you'd have to remove everything, light sanding of the new pads and rotors. Then follow break in as I've given a link a prior post.

Either way, you might need to check (500 miles) the unevenly wear of the pads.

Holler if I can help... What you have, you can drive with confidence.
The uneven wear on my front pads was from the pad holder being tight and not allowing the pad to relax of the rotor,
even after cleaning and wire brushing the inner front drivers side inner pad would not float in the hanger, I actually had to dress that slightly with a file to get the pad to move.
If the fronts had worn evenly they could have gone another 50,000 miles. The rotor on the passenger side would have cleaned up with a light cut on a lathe.
I replaced both sides as a standard practice.
On the rears I was surprised to see some taper wear on both inside pads.
As far as the mounting bolt size the front caliper hat mounting bolts were 20mm and the rears 21mm,
the caliper mount bolts were 13mm on the front and 10mm on the rear.
In my mind there is no good reason for that both ends of the truck could have had the same size bolts, ie. 21mm and 13mm.
This was the first vehicle that I can recall that I had to remove the caliper mounting hat (bridge) to install the pads, there was not the physical room to get the pads into the holder with it mounted on the vehicle.

As far as the break in procedure it was a surprise, apparently because of the coated rotors it was a long process;
From Power Stops instructions,
After installation, perform thirty decelerations from thirty miles per hour to five miles per hour. With the thirty seconds in between each deceleration for cooling. You should expect to smell some resin as the brakes get hot.

If you’re forced to a stop during deceleration, either shift into neutral or give room in front so you can allow the vehicle to roll slightly while waiting for the light. The rotors will be very hot and holding down the brake pedal will allow the pad to create an imprint on the rotor. This is where a judder can originate from.

Once this is completed the brakes have cooled to standard operating temperature, you may use the brakes normally. Never cool your brakes with water, as this can damage them. When this process is complete, enjoy your vehicle’s newest performance upgrade with Power Stop brakes.

Don’t Just Stop… Power Stop!
 

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The uneven wear on my front pads was from the pad holder being tight and not allowing the pad to relax of the rotor,
even after cleaning and wire brushing the inner front drivers side inner pad would not float in the hanger, I actually had to dress that slightly with a file to get the pad to move.
If the fronts had worn evenly they could have gone another 50,000 miles. The rotor on the passenger side would have cleaned up with a light cut on a lathe.
I replaced both sides as a standard practice.
On the rears I was surprised to see some taper wear on both inside pads.
As far as the mounting bolt size the front caliper hat mounting bolts were 20mm and the rears 21mm,
the caliper mount bolts were 13mm on the front and 10mm on the rear.
In my mind there is no good reason for that both ends of the truck could have had the same size bolts, ie. 21mm and 13mm.
This was the first vehicle that I can recall that I had to remove the caliper mounting hat (bridge) to install the pads, there was not the physical room to get the pads into the holder with it mounted on the vehicle.

As far as the break in procedure it was a surprise, apparently because of the coated rotors it was a long process;
From Power Stops instructions,
After installation, perform thirty decelerations from thirty miles per hour to five miles per hour. With the thirty seconds in between each deceleration for cooling. You should expect to smell some resin as the brakes get hot.

If you’re forced to a stop during deceleration, either shift into neutral or give room in front so you can allow the vehicle to roll slightly while waiting for the light. The rotors will be very hot and holding down the brake pedal will allow the pad to create an imprint on the rotor. This is where a judder can originate from.

Once this is completed the brakes have cooled to standard operating temperature, you may use the brakes normally. Never cool your brakes with water, as this can damage them. When this process is complete, enjoy your vehicle’s newest performance upgrade with Power Stop brakes.

Don’t Just Stop… Power Stop!
Lou you are awesome...
 
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