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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys. I just joined here to get some info on the Ecodiesel. Looking to buy a used one in a few months. There hard to find and not sure if that’s because everybody loves there’s and keeps them or not many out there. I was hoping I could get some basic pros and cons of owning one vs a gas truck. I have a 97 7.3 dually so would be downsizing a bit but I don’t need the 1 ton. I have a 7500# 27’ TT that we tow a couple times a year but that’s it for heavy towing. I like the idea of the mpgs the rest of the time not towing. Any info would be great regarding years to avoid or if there worth it. Just want to know longevity also as I don’t want a truck that’s always in the shop. Thank you
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have a 2014 which has just been incredible. No troubles except a couple of recalls that were handled easily. I like to talk to people that have one when i see them in a gas station, Grocery parking lot etc. I have yet to meet any in person that doesn't love there truck. Pulls like a Mule and i can get 30 Mpg on the road. Some have had troubles " i think they all are on this site LOL ! " but that's to be expected with anything. I think some dealers are to blame for not being knowledgeable enough to fix even the simplest of things. The Vast majority are mostly trouble free. Ask a professional transporter "Vern" on this site who racks up hundreds of thousands of miles. And yes they can be hard to find and always seem to be in demand and command a high re-sale value.
I hear of problems with early models. Anything specific to look for? I am very interested in one just want to make sure it can pull trailer fine and be semi reliable. Any issues with cooling pulling a trailer?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My 2014 has been pretty good truck. What are you going to do with it? They don’t like short trips and in the winter mine can take 20 miles to get to operating temperature but I drive a lot so it works for me.
Wife will use it a couple days a week to keep miles off her car. Her commute is over 20 miles one way. We have a 27’ 7500# TT that we use 2-3 times a year. That’s most of the towing it will do and good for road trips where we can get good fuel mileage
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You load that TT up and my take is you are over the tow rating of a pre-2020 Ecodiesel. Now the 2020 or newer ones have a higher tow rating so that is probably a better option if you do tow that much. Do some research on that tow rating topic.
The trailer weight is gross weight. Dry weight is 5700# but that’s why I am doing research to see if it can handle it fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
That's why the Ram 1500 EcoDiesel is very popular. It can be a daily commuter, grocery getter, and tow the boat/RV on the weekend. Mine is a daily driver, but I also use it as a workhorse and recreational tow rig.







That’s exactly what I’m looking for. Something that can do it all. I don’t tow all the time or crazy loads so no need for a 3/4 ton let alone the 1 ton dually I have. I just want to make sure these can tow 7500 fairly easy and not way overload it. I hear things about the grills being restrictive and a few other things. Can they tow fine without a tune? I’m in ca and it’s illegal to have those
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
I have a white 2015 Laramie with 77,000 miles. Just got back from a 2725 mile trip driving 75-80 miles per hr with lots-of puttering around in Virginia. It got 25 mpg overall. I’ve been doing a mile or 2 little trips all winter and the regen was getting more and more often. At first on this trip it was only getting 21 mpg on the dash, but at the end in Virginia it was registering 29.3 mpg. It has a GDE tune and just needs to be driven hard. I pull a single axle bass boat with it and it’ll get 15 mpg on pretty long trips. No problems so far, and I love the drive. I just have no need for a diesel while not using it properly. Im willing to sell it if you’re interested.
Thank you but I’m trying to find something with fewer miles on it. Thinking about the 20 or newer if I can afford it. Anybody with knowledge comparing the two?
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
the 2020 and newer models do no appear (going by the lack of reports of main engine bearings and engine failures online) to have the weaknesses/faults on the 2nd gen and I would have much more confidence in buying one of those vs the earlier models but the price difference reflects that.
Are the main bearing failures do to lack of good maintenance on these trucks? I’ve read a bunch on some other forums and some other people about not changing oil for 10000 plus miles and that can relate. I don’t believe in that long between oil changes on any vehicle
 

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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
With respects to the travel trailer all 1/2 ton Mfgrs recommend a weight distribution hitch when over 5k. Air bags are also relatively inexpensive and a great addition.

22 mpg is typical running around local. Highway unloaded running 65 mph would be high 20s for her commute.
I have a WDH for my current truck so would use it with the eco. I also want to get a sway bar for the added help with sway on the freeway. Current truck doesn’t sway much but it’s a dually so it can handle it. I don’t want to have cooling problems with the load but I’ll just have to watch temps
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
Their may be something I am missing. But the way I see it is a sway bar is for body sway or lean when cornering. Having nothing to do with trailer sway going down the highway. Weight distribution between steer & drive axle makes the truck steady to best withstand or resist trailer sway. Proper tongue weight helps greatly. After that a WDH with sway control resists sway before its even allowed to start. Additional electronics such as alternating brakes are an after the fact. A dually further makes the truck steady in that it has more rubber and a wider stance plus more weight plus stiffer suspension. Cooling issues are managed by simply keeping sustained rpms at or below 3k when the truck is really being taxed.

"According GDE, "the main bearing issues is partially design weaknesses and assembly tolerance stack-ups."" I subscribe to that. "You either get a good engine or you get a bad engine." I don't subscribe to that. I believe they are all bad or rather could be and now in the new gen are better with respects to the bearings. The reasons some fail early and some live a lets say full life is likely in duty cycle or use and maintenance including getting an actual and appropriate diesel oil. IMO Putt around at as low an rpm and high a gear as possible all the time not good. No oil pressure heavy load possible crank harmonic. Use generic bulk oil made for a gas 4 cylinder not good. Never let the oil get run a long time at full operating temps in order to evaporate water and unburnt diesel not good. Again just IMO.
I should have been more specific. I was referring to a sway bar on the trailer hitch not the truck. Do you personally think these motors are junk? I like the idea of them but if they have bad failure rates I’m not so sure about them. Any other info would be appreciated
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
@Jordan1500, think about the EcoDiesel's life expectancy as a bell-shaped curve. There are many EcoDiesels with 200,000 miles. There are some with 300,000. There's been a few with 400,000 miles. There's even one documented EcoDiesel that reached 500,000 miles!

Statistically speaking, the truck that cruises on the highway all day every day is going to last longer. The truck that makes lots of short commutes and doesn't get up to operating temperature is statistically going to run into more issues earlier on. So, how you drive the truck will be a big factor.

I'm the person that does both. I short trip my 2015 EcoDiesel nearly every day. The 2015 might hit the highway once per month. This is why I change the oil every 5,000 miles or so, then pull an oil sample just to monitor the engine condition. My 2015, at this time, has 104,000 miles with no signs of issues.

Before inflation, I ordered a new 2020 to have as a backup truck. The 2020 was just valued two weeks ago at $68,000 with 18,000 miles. I literally paid $54,000 for the truck when it was brand new (which included taxes)! I'm averaging about 10,000 miles per year on the 2020 and I'm averaging about 10,000 miles per year on the 2015. As you can see, both trucks will most likely last 15+ years before I need a major repair. Financially, this is the best option for me.
Thank you for all of that. We will short trip it some but my wife’s commute is up and over a mountain as we live far from big city so it should get up to temp fine going up and down the mtn. And freeway driving will be nice for road trips or just long distance for family visits and things. I hope to be getting one soon
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
Are those 10 - 12% the Friday afternoon or Monday Morning assemblies?

I'd suspect as someone mentioned earlier in another thread, it has as much to do with the oil used. Especially if the dealer is using 5w20...
What is the best oil to use with these? I plan on changing every 5k
 

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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
I run 10k oil changes no issues with T6. 875,000 miles over 3 engines never spit a bearing. Pre government intervention GDE. Like Hydrex EGR cooler removed and placed in the proper receptacle. I also regularly run long hours at full operating temps which evaporate moisture and fuel that get into the oil. Also I try not to run much bio.

"The 2020+ engines are not as hard on TBN, which tells me the low pressure EGR is a gamechanger." This is good to know.
I am going to try to find a 2020 if it’s reasonably priced. They sound like they don’t have the issues the older ones do or the headaches
 

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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
If you want to tow your 7,500 lb travel trailer that is 27' foot long, then you would be better off with the 2020+ EcoDiesel.

The good news is that used truck prices are SLOWLY coming down, however, interest rates are increasing. Do you know what options and trim level you want?
I would love a Laramie but think a big horn is more affordable and still is a nice interior. Gotta have 4x4 too. The 2020+ out here run about 45-60k and the pre 2020 run about 30-40k. Trying to make the extra 5-10k justifiable for a newer one with less problems
 

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Discussion Starter · #68 ·
My 2015 is a fairly loaded Big Horn. It has the Mopar Katzkin leather seats, navigation, towing package, 4x4, limited slip, side steps, and chrome package. We are happy with it.

The Longhorn is my favorite trim package, but Ram doesn't give a lot of rebates/discounts for the Laramie, Longhorn, or Limited, so those tend to stay expensive even as a used truck.

You mentioned mountain driving. The 2014 - 2019 EcoDiesel runs hot when towing due to the intercooler partially blocking the radiator. The 2020+ trucks separated the radiator and intercooler for maximum air flow, plus they enlarged the grille opening. I haven't had any cooling issues with our 2020 EcoDiesel. We've towed through NM, AZ, CA, NV, and UT.

Your other option is to see if the economy takes a hit. If that happens, you'll see prices drop on new and used vehicles.
Yes we live where there are mountains and like to travel where there are mountains. If we lived in a flat area it would probobly be fine but that might be a deal breaker for a pre 2020. We only tow 2-3 times a year but don’t want to deal with overheating. My 7.3 has never even got hot once in the 13 years I’ve owned it so would like to keep that running with the new truck
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
I’m also wondering if a v8 would be just as effective or better for towing the trailer a couple times a year? Just trying to figure out options. I’ve been reading on some other forums about The Ecodiesel and multiple engine replacements and being on back order and not sure that is something I want to deal with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #73 ·
There's no right or wrong answer. It really boils down to what you prefer to drive and what you're willing to tolerate. You've already concluded that the 2020+ EcoDiesel would be better for your towing needs. The 2020+ engines don't have the same issues as the previous generation engine, therefore that should take care of some of your concerns.

I'm more of an optimist than a pessimist, which is why I decided to keep our 2015 EcoDiesel. Instead of hyperventilating over the 10% - 15% failure rate in the 2014 - 2019 engines, I tend to focus more on the 85% - 90% of engines that don't fail.
Yes I like the idea of the 2020+. I’m just trying to do my research on all trucks to see what would be best. My main concern is towing since I don’t want any issues in that department. We only tow a couple times a year so it’s not a huge dealbreaker as far as what kind of truck. Any tips on what to look for on used Ecodiesels? I’ve found a few 2018-2019 with really low miles that look well kept but the engine is the priority
 

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Discussion Starter · #75 ·
I really don't have any tips other than making sure the truck is 100% bone stock with good service records. You want as much warranty as you can get. Most costly problems will arise inside the 5-year/100,000-mile powertrain warranty period, therefore age is just as important as miles. For example, a 2018 with 30,000 miles sounds like a great deal, but it only has 1 year of warranty left.

I budget $250 per month for future repairs. That's probably a little excessive, but that gives me peace of mind when my vehicles are outside of warranty. I've learned that a lot of people can afford the monthly payment, but they can't afford to maintain/repair the truck outside of warranty. I can't afford to keep buying new vehicles every 4 - 5 years, so I'm keeping my 2015 and 2020 for the next 20+ years.
Found a 2019 classic Laramie 4x4 with 23000 miles and by looking up the model and trim the max tow capacity based on that and the rear end ratio of 3.55 it can tow 7,770. My trailer gvw is 7600. Do you guys think that is too close to be pushing it? It only needs to tow a few weekends a year
 
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