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Hi All,

My first post. Thanks in advance for your responses. Btw, very useful posts so far. I am very inclined to buy the RAM 1500 diesel truck but need some advice first.

So here I go:

I bought a Rockwood Roo 183 last fall and I used my Nissan Frontier 2005 to tow it. Here are the specs and the mileage I have noticed with that truck.

Trailer:

-Length closed is about 21 ft end-to-end
-Weight fully loaded should be no more than 5,000 pounds. But i have only towed it at dry weight of 3800 pounds only.
-Dual Axle
-Hitch Weight 406 pounds

Truck:

- Towing capacity is 6,300 pounds
- Mileage on the city (winter driving) is about 14 MPG, highway is 18 MPG and highway towing is 10 MPG
- Gas tank capacity is 16 gallons

Needless to say my truck is great and all but the mileage to drive in the city and to tow my trailer is not ideal. Plus while towing I noticed the engine of my truck feels too rev'ed up. I was told by a friend who drives a 2007 Cherokee Diesel that his vehicle has awesome mileage in the highway and great for towing too. I was leaning towards buying a Cherokee Diesel but i discovered the RAM 1500 diesel is coming. To be honest i love trucks and i have my eyes fixed on this RAM truck.

What concerns me is the fact this is a very new vehicle in the market but willing to take my chances. Based on the specs for the RAM 1500 diesel and the size and weight of my trailer and considering i will be driving/towing through mountains with my family, my questions to you are:

- is this truck sufficient and capable to tow my trailer while offering efficient gas mileage?
- should I go instead with something more like a RAM 2500 with a Cummins engine?
- i will be driving also to the US west coast, is it a big issue finding Diesel at gas stations through the west coast? I assume no but i am newbie on diesel engines.

Just to let everyone know I was at a local dealer found out I can order my truck in Calgary Canada but they said there is a 6-8 lead times for delivery.

Regards,

David
 

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If I can believe what the reviews have said about the 1500 ecodiesel, I think the new 1500 with the v6 3.0l diesel should be a serious consideration for you.

IMO, the 2500 in any config is going to be much more truck than you will use as long you keep your towing below 9,000 lbs.

For the most part, with a few exceptions, most of us have not been able to even see or smell one. Yet, most are optimistic about what the new ram 1500 with the eco diesel engine and 8 speed transmission will offer those that are in need of a truck with moderate towing capability. Some potential Ram customers have got tired of waiting and went ahead and took a different route. Ram has delayed this new truck several times already and as of today my local dealers don't know when they can be ordered.

Purchasing the truck in Canada is certainly a option for some of us. I am about 1.5 hours from a Canadian Ram dealership. Canadian customers have been able to order for about three weeks now. It is something I might do as well, if I can not order the truck in the US and get it in time for my intended uses in April. Personally, I can give it a couple more weeks before I have to make a decision one way or the other. It is expected that the US orders once accepted, will take 10 -12 weeks for delivery.
 

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I tow a Roo 21BH with my Jeep Liberty Diesel, and will be upgrading to the Ram 1500 Diesel sometime later this year. This engine has more than we need to tow our little campers.

I have towed on the Mass Pike and through the mountains of PA. The biggest thing with the Jeep is the transmission. I need an tweener gear, and it won't hold a gear as long as I want. But, at 60, in hilly terrain, I tow in 3rd and maintain 2700 RPMS. On the flats, I tow in 4th and maintain about 1900 RPMS. I have noticed that if I am up over 3000+ RPMs, my EGT (Exhaust Gas Temperatures) will climb way too high.





 

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Only place I ever noticed problems getting fuel was around and In new York City. Long Island and maybe parts of Boston and other New England towns.

You don't want to go there anyhow.
 
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Everyone is getting to hung up on the tow numbers. This engine will tow a house. The truck is where the restriction is. A nicely equipped Laramie CC has a 800 lb payload. Family of 4 equals about 500lbs. That leaves 300lbs for tongue weight and everything else in the bed. Focus on payload.
 

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Everyone is getting to hung up on the tow numbers. This engine will tow a house. The truck is where the restriction is. A nicely equipped Laramie CC has a 800 lb payload. Family of 4 equals about 500lbs. That leaves 300lbs for tongue weight and everything else in the bed. Focus on payload.
That isn't accurate. Payload is 1,110 for a CC Laramie 4x4 6'4" Box. The CC 6'4" Box 4x4 Longhorn drops to 920. CC Laramie Rambox 4x4 1,020. CC Longhorn Rambox 4x4 has the lowest payload @ 840.

Crew Cab - 6'4" Box 4x4 - LARAMIE
3.0L DIESEL A8 8HP70 3.55 6,950 1,110 5,839 3,370 2,469 3,900 3,900 12,800 6,750
3.0L DIESEL A8 8HP70 3.92 6,950 1,110 5,839 3,370 2,469 3,900 3,900 14,500 8,450

I do agree that the payload is low on the Laramie and Longhorn and that the Rambox option simply kills the payload.

Higher payloads for the EcoDiesel option can be had though.

example; CC 6'4" 4x4 SLT/Outdoorsman/Big Horn have a payload of 1,260

Olli
 

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That isn't accurate. Payload is 1,110 for a CC Laramie 4x4 6'4" Box. The CC 6'4" Box 4x4 Longhorn drops to 920. CC Laramie Rambox 4x4 1,020. CC Longhorn Rambox 4x4 has the lowest payload @ 840.

Crew Cab - 6'4" Box 4x4 - LARAMIE
3.0L DIESEL A8 8HP70 3.55 6,950 1,110 5,839 3,370 2,469 3,900 3,900 12,800 6,750
3.0L DIESEL A8 8HP70 3.92 6,950 1,110 5,839 3,370 2,469 3,900 3,900 14,500 8,450

I do agree that the payload is low on the Laramie and Longhorn and that the Rambox option simply kills the payload.

Higher payloads for the EcoDiesel option can be had though.

example; CC 6'4" 4x4 SLT/Outdoorsman/Big Horn have a payload of 1,260

Olli
No it is not incorrect but I should have been more clear. The payloads are different for each truck. It is on the door sticker from factory. Internet numbers give an idea but are not accurate numbers. The door sticker is for your truck. There is a good example of a guy that bought a Laramie fully loaded to pull his new trailer. Long story short he had to trade in his new trailer for a smaller one. He was well under tow rating but his payload was 808lbs. His trailer and family and luggage were over 1200lbs. Truck handled terrible. This was covered here already. So find out your payload for the truck you want. Every option ordered reduces payload and diesel plus emissions package weighs in at around 200lbs I believe so figure that in too. They didn't change suspension for diesel. If the guy above bought the diesel Laramie with his options the payload would have been 608lbs.
 

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Actually, I too find the payload capability of the 1500 very low. This factor alone might have me looking at a 2500 and my towing needs are not extreme at all. I tow a 20' enclosed car trailer. loaded I am @ 55-5700 lbs. for an approx. tongue weight of 570 lbs. That is nearly half of the payload capacity of the Laramie 4x4 CC 6'4" box model that I am considering (1,110 lbs) I only have about 550 lbs of payload left. Not good. Now add myself ,wife, son and luggage.....problem.

I have had two F250s and now drive a F150. I know the difference in towing the above trailer between a 3/4 ton truck and a 1/2 ton. Night and day. I just don't tow as frequently now and am/was hoping that I could get away with a 1500. (The F150 Ecoboost is a very thirsty engine)

Olli
 

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Last time I looked Chevy/GMCs lowest payload rating was 1,740lbs. There deffiently is a problem with the rams towing and payload capacity
 

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It only makes cense to offer a 1500 HD with the ED. They had a 1500 HD in 2012 with a payload of about 3100 pounds. That would be ideal. I would just hate for Ram (Fiat,lol) to offer an HD model the year AFTER I buy a 1500 ED.
 

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Hi All,

My first post. Thanks in advance for your responses. Btw, very useful posts so far. I am very inclined to buy the RAM 1500 diesel truck but need some advice first. ...

...What concerns me is the fact this is a very new vehicle in the market but willing to take my chances. Based on the specs for the RAM 1500 diesel and the size and weight of my trailer and considering i will be driving/towing through mountains with my family, my questions to you are:

- is this truck sufficient and capable to tow my trailer while offering efficient gas mileage?
- should I go instead with something more like a RAM 2500 with a Cummins engine?
- i will be driving also to the US west coast, is it a big issue finding Diesel at gas stations through the west coast? I assume no but i am newbie on diesel engines.
Welcome! If you have been towing with a Frontier successfully then the 3.0L diesel should work well and show a significant mpg increase. However, you will have to select the right truck model and options for your expected payload. You don't say how big your family is but several people, dogs, miscellaneous gear in the truck, and the trailer hitch weight could easily exceed the rated payload. If you can forgo some of the weighty options such as 4x4, side steps, sun roof and so on, that will help boost payload. With the info Ram provides online you can get within about 50 lbs of a truck's badged weight. I verified this by comparing the badges on several trucks at the dealer with what I computed from the weight tables. (It would be interesting to see what they actually weighed on a truck scale.)

If managing payload proves to be difficult or you just have to have a top-of-the-line 4x4 Crew Cab--because you deserve it!--then you have some decisions to make. The 2500 would be overkill and less economical but would transport your family easily and safely. If the trailer is used only a few times in the year then the 2500 would be annoying to drive and park the rest of the time. The 1500 is a nicer daily driver and is certainly capable of towing your trailer on occasion although you may need to be careful of excessive load. Your choice.

Diesel is readily available throughout the west because most goods are transported by diesel trucks. Fuel websites or apps will show where and how much.
 

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Towing 3600 pound trailer, that is right in the 1500s wheel house. Bigfoot's comment on pay load is a consideration for sure.

Jumping to a 2500, no matter what make or brand, would likely be overkill. The 2500 rides a little more stiff, a little bigger, and fact is a 1500 is more easy to maneuver in your daily driving as someone noted.

Availability should not be an issue.

Chessie-Chooch, good pictures of the Jeep and the camper, nice to see the diesel in action.

Marsman
 

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I guess you could add a leaf spring. Wait a minute. Coil springs in the back. Lol. Regardless of what ram you buy, you will have a smile on your face. I love my 2014 ram. She is way to nice to pull a trailer anyways. Hahaha. I would bet on a HD model. The diesel is just to much engine for the 1500.
 

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Towing over 10,000 LBS requires a commercial license in several states. I'm pretty sure both rear ends for the Ecodiesel are perfect for your needs
 

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I hear you. I do not haul much weight just tow a bass boat and carry a odds and ends in bed never more than 800 pounds. So this application is great for my use especially when I travel empty and no towing commuting to and from work also at 80 miles round trip a day hyw. 30k a year all together. I have a Honda Ridgeline now ive had new since 2009 and it has been great. I don't need the bigger truck really and the new GMC small truck if it gets a 2.8 diesel would actually be better for me because I like the smaller truck but need to tow my 4500 pound bass boat. Now that is full of gear and gas too. My Ridgeline struggles towing it and I only get 9 mpg. Maybe 10. My Toyota Tundra I had before it got 12 towing and 16 mixed not towing. I am 90% hyw. Ridgeline gets 20 mixed and 9 towing but struggles on pulling the boat. I just like having the smaller truck as far as size of vehicle for garage and just parking etc. My Chevy before it got 17 and 12. I usually only keep my truck two years about 60k but this one is 5 years and right at 145k.
 

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I can tell you right now with 100% positive information, with the payload your are talking about ( wet ) or Loaded...... You Can buy any model Ram 1500 3.0 Diesel loaded to the max with every option and your 5000 lb unit will feel like a 14 foot duck boat with a 9.9 Merc on it. :D

Here's proof image.jpg a

I have a prototype 5th wheel hitch right now, Thursday I will be installing the permenant hitch.

This camper weighs 10,500 and it pulls like a dream, and it is the best riding tow rig I have ever been in ( and I have been in a lot of trucks )

Rides better and feels better in everyway then my 2004 Ram 3500 Dually 5.9 Cummins with Kelderman Air Ride. ( the short pin box is to die for )
Wish I would have shortened it for Dually and put in a slider hitch - long pin boxes suck !!

Truck is a loaded Laramie Limited with 4 Corner air ride and Ram Box.

I am going on a 500 mile tow this week end and I will check mileage. It will be on cruise control the entire trip 65 to 70 mph
 

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IndyDan fill us in on your mileage , temps and all the good stuff after your trip.
 
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Towing over 10,000 LBS requires a commercial license in several states. I'm pretty sure both rear ends for the Ecodiesel are perfect for your needs
No it does not, a CDL is for commercial use only, there are some states that require a NON Commercial license to tow over 10,000# but not a CDL! To get a CDL you must take and pass an approved CDL class. There are four different CDL licenses, Calss A 26,001#+, class B 10,001-26,000#, commercial bus and school bus. Unless you are transporting an RV for delivery you do not need a CDL.
 

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No it does not, a CDL is for commercial use only, there are some states that require a NON Commercial license to tow over 10,000# but not a CDL! To get a CDL you must take and pass an approved CDL class. There are four different CDL licenses, Calss A 26,001#+, class B 10,001-26,000#, commercial bus and school bus. Unless you are transporting an RV for delivery you do not need a CDL.
From what I understand that is correct, I have a Class A combination license for over 30 years and the only time I needed it was to pull Wide beam boats past
8 1/2 feet wide...... And then only needed the Class A when I was working fir someone.

I pull my own 11 foot beam boat and when I have been pulled over the cops just seem to want to ask questions and wish it was their boat LOL !!

As for anything RV related it sure seems mostly unregulated. ( I asked a few cops about this when I was pulling over 70 feet long when the law was still 60 feet in my state.

They all said basically the same thing........... There is so few accidents and zero pressure from the top about RV's so it's seems to be a non-issue.

Not saying it's right ( a 90 year man driving a 60,000 lb Conversion Class A for his first time with a class C license seems a little dangerous )
But I must say I have never seen one in an accident.
 
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