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You all keep looking for a boogeyman but failed bearings are nothing new to any engine from any brand. Clearly the bearing clearance was not so tight that a 40 weight oil would not work, when you have really tight bearing clearance you have to run thinner oil, if the clearance is not so tight you need to run a thicker oil, now that we know a 40 weight oil works fine in the ecodiesel we can also make an educated guess that a 30 weight oil would lead to bearing failure in a certain amount of engines because the clearance is to much for a 30 weight oil to properly protect the bearings.

No one knows how many ecodiesels had owners who bought the cheapest oil the could find, and as much as many of you want to believe that all oils are the same there are differences in oils even when they pass the API test to get that little API symbol on their bottle. There are oils of the same weight where one will shear and fall out of grade and another will hold up fine remaining in grade yet both passed the same API test and have the same API symbol on the oil bottle.

Passing an API test to get the API symbol on your bottle is one thing, the oil being used in real world use is an entirely different situation.

Like the man said in the bearing company video buy the best oil you can afford then buy the next better oil. In other words he was telling you the quality of the oil plays a big part in protecting the bearings. Run the cheap stuff if you want, it is your money and your truck for me I will stick with Redline and pay the extra price and know I have an oil that will out preform the cheap stuff.
You really don’t understand engine design do you. The oil has nothing to due with the mains spinning.
 

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You really don’t understand engine design do you. The oil has nothing to due with the mains spinning.
Are you really sure you want to keep this statement up? Many engines over the years from every manufacture has spun a bearing where oil was in fact the cause. There are several reasons why a bearing can spin and the only thing protecting the bearings is, wait for it, OIL. Without that thin flow of oil keeping the metal surface of the crankshaft off of the bearing surface engines would blow up left and right.
 

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Are you really sure you want to keep this statement up? Many engines over the years from every manufacture has spun a bearing where oil was in fact the cause. There are several reasons why a bearing can spin and the only thing protecting the bearings is, wait for it, OIL. Without that thin flow of oil keeping the metal surface of the crankshaft off of the bearing surface engines would blow up left and right.
Yes I am positive about my statement and yes I do work for an engine oem. Ive been working on diesels for a long time and have seen mains spin multiple times its never been the oil itself as the root cause. The difference from a 5W-30 to 5W-40 is basically nothing when film strength comes into play. In fact the engines fail at low rpm where a 5W-30 might protect better. Also when they made the switch t6 sheared into a 30 weight within 3-4k anyways.
 

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Here are three different Diesel engines, from the Duramax 6.6 to the Powerstrike 6.7 to the Cummins 6.7, all have spun bearings at some point. Why did they, well I think we can assume they were all assembled correctly, we can also assume they were built in a clean environment, we don't know how the customer treated the engines, did some run the oil to long and end up with dirty oil that wiped out a bearing? Did some just have oil that failed. The Powerstroke listed below was a new truck with only 1,304 miles on it, the point is no manufacture is immune from have their engines spinning a bearing for any number of reasons including the cause being the oil. The number of spun bearing in the ecodiesel went way down after the oil spec change, deny it all you want but that is fact. Two are links too long blocks and they point blank tell you they will not repair and even accept as a core a block that has spun a bearing. I post them just to show those engines can spin a bearing as well.

This is the Duramax 6.6:


All engines are blueprinted. We do not weld or repair cracked blocks, cranks or heads. We do not use cylinder sleeves to repair badly worn or damaged cylinders. If we do not have a good rebuildable engine core we will not offer an engine for sale. Cylinders are bored in a CNC Machining center & honed to a maximum of .020. No sleeves or crack repaired blocks!

Main bearing saddles are align honed or align bored to OEM specs. We do not try and repair blocks with "spun" main bearings. If your core has a spun main bearing, it will not be accepted as a useable core.

This is from a Ford forum "Powerstroke":

So the engine in my brand new 2019 F350 is junk. It died on me about a mile from my house with 1304 miles on it. It's currently apart at the dealership right now, engine of full of metal, oil pan to intake. Looks like it spun at least 3 rod bearings. Anybody else seen something like this? My 2011 ran flawlessly for 120k, I hope I dont end up regretting my 2019.

This is the Cummins 6.7 ISB:


Main bearing saddles are align honed or align bored. This is part of the blueprint process. We do not try and repair blocks with "spun" main bearings.
 

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Here are three different Diesel engines, from the Duramax 6.6 to the Powerstrike 6.7 to the Cummins 6.7, all have spun bearings at some point. Why did they, well I think we can assume they were all assembled correctly, we can also assume they were built in a clean environment, we don't know how the customer treated the engines, did some run the oil to long and end up with dirty oil that wiped out a bearing? Did some just have oil that failed. The Powerstroke listed below was a new truck with only 1,304 miles on it, the point is no manufacture is immune from have their engines spinning a bearing for any number of reasons including the cause being the oil. The number of spun bearing in the ecodiesel went way down after the oil spec change, deny it all you want but that is fact. Two are links too long blocks and they point blank tell you they will not repair and even accept as a core a block that has spun a bearing. I post them just to show those engines can spin a bearing as well.

This is the Duramax 6.6:


All engines are blueprinted. We do not weld or repair cracked blocks, cranks or heads. We do not use cylinder sleeves to repair badly worn or damaged cylinders. If we do not have a good rebuildable engine core we will not offer an engine for sale. Cylinders are bored in a CNC Machining center & honed to a maximum of .020. No sleeves or crack repaired blocks!

Main bearing saddles are align honed or align bored to OEM specs. We do not try and repair blocks with "spun" main bearings. If your core has a spun main bearing, it will not be accepted as a useable core.

This is from a Ford forum "Powerstroke":

So the engine in my brand new 2019 F350 is junk. It died on me about a mile from my house with 1304 miles on it. It's currently apart at the dealership right now, engine of full of metal, oil pan to intake. Looks like it spun at least 3 rod bearings. Anybody else seen something like this? My 2011 ran flawlessly for 120k, I hope I dont end up regretting my 2019.

This is the Cummins 6.7 ISB:


Main bearing saddles are align honed or align bored. This is part of the blueprint process. We do not try and repair blocks with "spun" main bearings.

None of this junk is relevant to Gen 2 EcoDiesels that have many failures running only T6 5w-40 their entire life.
 

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None of this junk is relevant to Gen 2 EcoDiesels that have many failures running only T6 5w-40 their entire life.
I hate to tell you but Shell T-6 is not the holy grail of oil.

You want to ignore other engines from other brands that have spun rod and main bearings, spinning a bearing is not unique to the ecodiesel.

Here you go the almighty 5.7 Hemi spun bearing:

My 05 hemi is knocking/spun bearing. The truck has 126k miles.

Another 5.7 Hemi with spun bearings:

2004 Dodge: I have spun 2 bearings on the crankshaft..4wd..quad cab…
I have spun 2 bearings on the crankshaft of my 2004 Dodge ram 5.7 Hemi 4wd quadcab. I am in Auckland New Zealand. The engine is out and has done 138,00kms around 70,000 miles.

Another 5.7 Hemi spun bearings:

Ram 1500: I spun a bearing on my 2005 dodge ram 1500 5.7 liter…
I spun a bearing on my 2005 dodge ram 1500 5.7 liter engine, I have less than 74k miles on it.

There is no boogeyman, no engine or manufacture is exempt from spinning a main or rod bearing, once the change in oil spec the number of spun bearings plummeted that does not mean there would or will never be another spun bearing. You want to ignore spun bearings from other engines and manufactures so you can continue to chase a non existent boogeyman with the ecodiesel.
 

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Why Is 5W-40 Now Recommended For The EcoDiesel Engine?

It took some digging, but we think we may have found the answer. We spoke to several Dodge dealers and also FCA Customer Care. Few had even heard of the engine oil changeover or they simply read back the bulletin. But a service manager at a Salt Lake City Dodge dealership had heard all about the reason for this oil switch from an FCA warranty official. Apparently the 3.0L EcoDiesel engine is experiencing an unsettling number of main bearing failures. FCA is laying the blame on the thin viscosity of 5W-30 engine oil. They believe that the thicker viscosity of 5W-40 engine oil will cure this issue. This service manager suggested that all model years will have a 5W-40 recommendation and that 5W-30 engine oil will be obsolete for the EcoDiesel engine.
 

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Why Is 5W-40 Now Recommended For The EcoDiesel Engine?

It took some digging, but we think we may have found the answer. We spoke to several Dodge dealers and also FCA Customer Care. Few had even heard of the engine oil changeover or they simply read back the bulletin. But a service manager at a Salt Lake City Dodge dealership had heard all about the reason for this oil switch from an FCA warranty official. Apparently the 3.0L EcoDiesel engine is experiencing an unsettling number of main bearing failures. FCA is laying the blame on the thin viscosity of 5W-30 engine oil. They believe that the thicker viscosity of 5W-40 engine oil will cure this issue. This service manager suggested that all model years will have a 5W-40 recommendation and that 5W-30 engine oil will be obsolete for the EcoDiesel engine.
You love beating a dead horse the failure rate proves it was a band aid that did nothing.
 

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300-Miles on the new engine so far. Mileage hand-calc'ed at 25.19 mpg for city/highway mixed driving. No Regen yet...
Just break-in / introduce her nice and gentle sounds like she'll start smoothing her MPG's as the mileage goes up. How's the ride and power feel compared to the prior motor? Congrats!
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
Just break-in / introduce her nice and gentle sounds like she'll start smoothing her MPG's as the mileage goes up. How's the ride and power feel compared to the prior motor? Congrats!
Ride, power, everything is exactly the same as prior motor since GDE back on board. Had to drive home from the dealer with stock tune and that is very different in not a good way. Really LOVE this truck!!!
 

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Ride, power, everything is exactly the same as prior motor since GDE back on board. Had to drive home from the dealer with stock tune and that is very different in not a good way. Really LOVE this truck!!!
Glad it all worked out for you, here's to many miles ahead!
 

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Look at this way if the failure rate was 20% which we know it was not 20% that would mean out of the reported 170,000 ecodiesel Rams sold 34,000 of them would have failed. What we do know is during a nine month period that the 2014, 2015 and first half 2016 ecdiesels used 5w-30 oil the average failure rate hit 215 ecodiesels a month over that 9 month period. that was a high enough failure rate that FCA conducted an investigation by tearing down a number of the failed engines and their engineers determined that the 5w-30 oil did not have a strong enough film strength to protect the bearings in the bottom end. That is when the oil spec was changed to 5w-40 because 40 weight oil has a stronger film strength to protect the bearings.

Now lets take that 215 average over nine months and we come up with 1,935 trucks that failed in that nine month span, that was enough to get the attention of FCA to investigate and make a change, now take 170,000 - 1,935 = 168,065 trucks that did not suffer a bottom end failure. But we know that number is not accurate either so lets add another failure rate of 0.4% and you have another 672.26 ecodiesel that have failed. Add 1,965 to 673 (rounded up) and you come up with 2,638 ecodiesels with the majority of them failing during a nine month period before the oil spec was changed from 30 weight oil to a 40 weight oil. Now take 170,000 - 2,638 = 167,362 ecodiesels that did not/have not suffered a bottom end bearing failure.

Again like another poster pointed out take your favorite engine of all time and someone can show you examples of that engine that have blown up for any number of reasons.

To address the line bore issue one poster is blaming on the failures, if the line bore was the case then the failure rate should be 50% at a minimum because you are now basically flipping a coin on reliability.

With the known numbers the failure rate of the ecodiesel overall is 1.55% resulting in 2,635 failed ecodiesels or 3 short of the number above (2,638) and that includes the nine month period where the average was 215 a month before the oil spec change to 40 weight oil out of 170,000 ecodiesel Rams sold.

I suspect if you listed the Jeep eocdiesel sales/failure numbers you would come up with similar percent rate of failure numbers.

The first 2 1/2 years where the failure rate peaked in 2016 before the oil spec change to 40 weight oil would be the bulk of the ecodiesel failures so the percentage of failures would have been higher in those first 2 1/2 years and the failure rate from the second half of 2016 forward the failure rate would be far less.
I have a 2016. First engine replaced at 83k in 2019. Then 11 months later and 22k miles second engine replaced.
The second engine had 5w40 oil the life of the engine. Now on 3rd engine
 

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Discussion Starter · #60 ·
I have a 2016. First engine replaced at 83k in 2019. Then 11 months later and 22k miles second engine replaced.
The second engine had 5w40 oil the life of the engine. Now on 3rd engine
If I've got to go to Engine #3, I hope #2 goes within the 3-yr/100K warranty....
 
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