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I’m in the market for a used eco diesel. Are there any years to avoid? I mainly see 2015’s for sale. Also what would be considered high mileage in these trucks? I know Cummins will go forever but idk what the life expectancy is of these engines. Are there any geographical areas to avoid? I know salt is an issue in the north and flood damage is an issue on the hurricane coastal areas. Any advice for a new buy is appreciated. Thanks
 

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2015 Bighorn, CC, 6'4", 4x4, 3.55
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Welcome to the forum!

Admittedly 2014-2016 had the most issues, but at this point it probably makes no difference what year you buy. Any 14-16 that succumbed to those issues will have been fixed by now. The EcoD has had quite a few engine failures at low mileage, but there are also many that have gone over 100k miles with few (or no) issues, and a few exceeding 400k miles. So certainly there are some like @Gearjammer, but there are a great deal more who are still very happy with their trucks despite having had issues (myself included).There are a few things to look out for regardless of model year, and this thread would be a good place to start:

 
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Keep looking elsewhere. Replacing engines is wayyy to hard on the pocket book. Been there and done that $17,500 later. Taking apart my old engine right now to see what is all needed to have a replacement when this new one grenades. My truck has had a vibration at 100 km/h since I bought it. So far new tires with beads trying to solve it. I had fancy glued on chrome covered inserts on my factory rims and they said oh, it must be the rim building up with dust where the glue isn't throwing the wheels off balance. I bought new one piece rims and the same shakey shake. Then I was told there was a recall on axles, but my trucks serial # said my truck wasn't one of the ones with trouble. They threw it on hoist and had me run the wheels at 80 km/h. They noticed one axle kind of untrue. Wheel kind of wiggling. They order a $580 axle and install and I am thinking finally this thing is fixed. Nope same old same old. Gave up on my dealer and am taking it to a place for a driveshaft balancing. Replaced U-joints and still nothing earlier on which I forgot. Did some research and apparently this is not an uncommon thing with Dodge 1500s. This thing need a boost sensor but apparently isn't covered under the 2 yr new engine warranty. Threw over $650 at that the other day. $115 charge to hook the scan tool to it lol. Walk away and look elsewhere. Drove dodges my whole life and learned the hard way to stay away from these ones. Buy a 2500 with a cummins if you must have a diesel. Delete it and just drive. Ya it will burn more fuel but the money you spend trying to keep these 1500 eco's running buys way more fuel than you can burn and you have a truck that is up to work and tow anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the responses I think maybe I will look more into a 2500 after hearing about all the problems. The main draw for me is the fuel mileage that these trucks get.
 

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Wow....such insight. Let me offer a different perspective, and I am a long term owner and many of us have had no issues and enjoy exceptional mileage I average 27 mpg with about 19 towing and if i'm being easy on the pedal i'll easily top over 30 mpg. now there have been issues with these trucks, but there have also been recalls which did replace the EGR due to a flawed design and currently some folks have a tone wheel issue which for some is covered by an extended warranty.

These are fantastic trucks but like any vehicle, knowing it's history makes a world of difference and is key. If you understand diesels you'll know that all manufactures are experiencing issues ACROSS the board this is primarily related EPA mandated DEF systems. Personally I wouldn't consider a used Eco Diesel because of those reasons, but I wouldn't consider a Cummings, Powerstroke or Duramax either also for those same reasons used diesel is crap shoot and an expensive one at that.

It's a tough market with new trucks being so damn expensive and used just as exorbitant its a tough time for anyone who has a need. I hope luck finds you and whatever you choose brings many miles of reliability.
 

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2015 RAM 1500 Ecodiesel
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Wow....such insight. Let me offer a different perspective, and I am a long term owner and many of us have had no issues and enjoy exceptional mileage I average 27 mpg with about 19 towing and if i'm being easy on the pedal i'll easily top over 30 mpg. now there have been issues with these trucks, but there have also been recalls which did replace the EGR due to a flawed design and currently some folks have a tone wheel issue which for some is covered by an extended warranty.

These are fantastic trucks but like any vehicle, knowing it's history makes a world of difference and is key. If you understand diesels you'll know that all manufactures are experiencing issues ACROSS the board this is primarily related EPA mandated DEF systems. Personally I wouldn't consider a used Eco Diesel because of those reasons, but I wouldn't consider a Cummings, Powerstroke or Duramax either also for those same reasons used diesel is crap shoot and an expensive one at that.

It's a tough market with new trucks being so damn expensive and used just as exorbitant its a tough time for anyone who has a need. I hope luck finds you and whatever you choose brings many miles of reliability.
Texas Joe, I think you said it well!

I’m not saying they are perfect but how many Cummins have fuel pump issues, injector issues, etc…. Diesels are economical if a person can fix themselves or own a shop for their fleet with a Trusted technician on staff.

If the bad press is getting to them, it says one thing - an older diesel (not just the ecodiesel) is simply not for them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Wow....such insight. Let me offer a different perspective, and I am a long term owner and many of us have had no issues and enjoy exceptional mileage I average 27 mpg with about 19 towing and if i'm being easy on the pedal i'll easily top over 30 mpg. now there have been issues with these trucks, but there have also been recalls which did replace the EGR due to a flawed design and currently some folks have a tone wheel issue which for some is covered by an extended warranty.

These are fantastic trucks but like any vehicle, knowing it's history makes a world of difference and is key. If you understand diesels you'll know that all manufactures are experiencing issues ACROSS the board this is primarily related EPA mandated DEF systems. Personally I wouldn't consider a used Eco Diesel because of those reasons, but I wouldn't consider a Cummings, Powerstroke or Duramax either also for those same reasons used diesel is crap shoot and an expensive one at that.

It's a tough market with new trucks being so damn expensive and used just as exorbitant its a tough time for anyone who has a need. I hope luck finds you and whatever you choose brings many miles of reliability.
Thanks for the reply it’s good to hear a different perspective. It seems that the consensus is that these can be good reliable trucks once they are deleted and tuned.
 

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Thanks for the responses I think maybe I will look more into a 2500 after hearing about all the problems. The main draw for me is the fuel mileage that these trucks get.
Hi: tx37diver... I love my truck. I just hope nothing major goes wrong till I'm finished paying for it!!! LoL As with anything used... check out it's herstory completely!!!
Dieseldragon North shore of Lake Erie.
Automotive parking light Wheel Tire Vehicle Motor vehicle
 

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If you routinely tow say an 9k plus trailer look for a 2500. If you don’t need that much truck but you need big miles fuel economy and long-term trouble free operation I’d look at a 2020 or newer Ecodiesel.

That is the new upgraded 5th gen with the new dramatically upgraded Ecodiesel engine & 2nd gen emissions system. To be fair you can say the 2020+ hasn’t had time to prove itself yet. But so far early Indications are good.

Last you might also consider ordering new. Used truck prices are stupid high. But new trucks with a cash deposit order can be bought very reasonably. My son recently took delivery of his 2022 Ecodiesel.
 

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Thanks for the reply it’s good to hear a different perspective. It seems that the consensus is that these can be good reliable trucks once they are deleted and tuned.
A good tune will keep you out of the check engine light scenario more but as far as engine failures there is no rhyme or reason. Just a throw of the dice!
 

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If FCA has improved their eco diesel engine problems then warranty it to 100,000 miles. If you have faith in your product back it. This isn't a scenario you will find FCA committing too. Main bearing failure is no small problem. Especially when you can't even buy parts. Think about it! It's a joke. 118,000 Km is 73,000 miles when mine went. Many blew at way less miles and some at more miles. Guys say oh but you don't know the history of the guy who had it before. I don't care who makes an engine. If it doesn't make 20,000km, and many never, it ain't the fault of the owner. Not an engine out there that should fail regardless the oil change interval at 20,000 km. If you are the 96/100 that got an engine that lived good for you. Consider yourself lucky. I could say Cummins is a bad engine too. They can be fixed and guess what? You can actually buy parts. Ask your dealer for a main bearing for an Eco Diesel.and see how that goes.
 

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It really depends on your needs and wants. Is the only reason you're looking at the ecodiesel economy? You might be better off looking for the V6 gasser. Not a big drop in mileage when not towing and still get the functionality of the pickup. Fuel may be slightly cheaper depending on where you're at and maintenance is cheaper. I understand the "Has to be a diesel" stance. That's the primary reason mine is sitting in the driveway today. From 14-19, the classic models are pretty much all the same engine. Some minor changes in the sheet metal in 19 and newer and the new engine in 21, I think. You might be money ahead to purchase new sine the used prices are really high right now.
 

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Welcome to the forum!

Admittedly 2014-2016 had the most issues, but at this point it probably makes no difference what year you buy. Any 14-16 that succumbed to those issues will have been fixed by now. The EcoD has had quite a few engine failures at low mileage, but there are also many that have gone over 100k miles with few (or no) issues, and a few exceeding 400k miles. So certainly there are some like @Gearjammer, but there are a great deal more who are still very happy with their trucks despite having had issues (myself included).There are a few things to look out for regardless of model year, and this thread would be a good place to start:

Would you mind telling me how the 2014-2016 EDs are fixed? I've completed all recalls but the most recent as parts are backordered.

I've got a disappointing 2015 ED, and after the FCA AEM recall and update. I have poor performance and this is not the same truck that I bought.

Dangerous turbo lag when cold. Drastically, reduced mpg, before AEM 26-30 mpg... After barely getting 18-19mpg. I, too, have a random horrible exhaust smell when stopping at a light.

I've been to the dealership more with this truck than ALL trucks I've ever owned put together.

Over the past five years, I have nothing good to say about Ram and the lying Chuckleheads at FCA.
 

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Would you mind telling me how the 2014-2016 EDs are fixed? I've completed all recalls but the most recent as parts are backordered.

I've got a disappointing 2015 ED, and after the FCA AEM recall and update. I have poor performance and this is not the same truck that I bought.

Dangerous turbo lag when cold. Drastically, reduced mpg, before AEM 26-30 mpg... After barely getting 18-19mpg. I, too, have a random horrible exhaust smell when stopping at a light.

I've been to the dealership more with this truck than ALL trucks I've ever owned put together.

Over the past five years, I have nothing good to say about Ram and the lying Chuckleheads at FCA.
Perhaps I should have been more specific in my explanation. I didn't mean that every single issue on every single truck was solved perfectly and nobody will ever have those problems again. What I meant was any truck that was specifically traded in because of one of the known issues would have that issue fixed prior to being sold, and therefore it would not be something to worry about. For example, if it was traded in because of a blown engine, the engine will have been replaced and he wouldn't need to worry as much about a new engine blowing up on him. Same goes for the EGR recall and reluctor wheel. Yes it would likely have the AEM and we all know that sucks, but if he test drove it with that and was comfortable with it, no harm no foul. If he didn't like the lag and other issues, at least with the latest software he's primed for a tune. As for exhaust smell, I haven't heard too many complaints of it (you are the first I know of that alludes to a chronic issue). I am aware of the recall for 2wd trucks, but I haven't heard many complaints specific to that recall either.

I'm sorry to hear you've had, and still have, issues with your truck. I have as well and fought with FCA over it too, it definitely sucks.
 

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dookiller, Engine failures of 14-19 by 100,000 miles seem to be best numbers conclusions I've seen around 4-5%. This is entirely too high as I've read industry averages are like 1/2 of 1%. They tried to band aid it with better more suitable oil and engine tuning but it is what it is. Looks like VM Motori has finally resolved the emissions / bearing issue with the new 2020 engine.

The 2020+ Ecodiesel engine like the 14-19 does have a 100,000 mile warranty here in the states. I assume you are in Canada where it is for whatever reason less. All Ram,'s gas engines only carry a 60,000 mile warranty which is also common with other manufactures.

The vehicles history does matter. If the previous owner put the wrong oil ie insufficient additives cheap bulk oil made for a 4 cylinder gas engine in it then he has not met with VM Motori's / FCA Stelantis requirements for warranty. He has put the bearings in a susceptible position for them to get advanced wear soot clogged and be in a position where the crank will twist one out for an engine failure.

Ecodiesel engines in my opinion are as you allude disposable engines. Our three have been disposed of at an average of 415,000 miles. Cheap $7,500 complete crate engine which include turbo & new high pressure fuel pump and a 100,000 mile warranty replaced them. The Cummins 6.7 costs an additional $10k but is industrial grade and makes parts for a rebuild available. You can also buy a remanufactured basic crate engine without turbo or high pressure fuel pump and I believe a 60k warranty for $19,995. Choose what fits you and the job you need it to do.

Slow, FCA gave us $3,050 to bring our truck in for them to put in the government/EPA mandated emissions / AEM detune. Many of us took $1k of that to get a proper aftermarket engine & trans tune to fix what the government did. The tunes made it an even better running more reliable more powerful with improved mileage motor than even the original factory tune. You don't hear these people complaining about their trucks or pocketing the $2k they got for being inconvenienced. Others pocketed the $3k traded her in and dumped the problem on the next unsuspecting buyer. Others still pocketed the money and are hoping the additional warranties will fix their truck right. Your Ram dealership mechanic cannot per the unconstitutional but political environment we live in fix it right. The only way to fix your truck right is to get it fixed outside the long arm of our EPA through out of country tuner companies or certain scenario in county tuners. Its amazing with no emissions equipment especially EGR & EGR cooler and proper non emissions tuning with drivelability fuel economy & longevity being the priority how much better reliable & long lasting these become. I am not saying there should be no emission equipment only that the way and rate that they government forced this has had its costs.
 
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Would you mind telling me how the 2014-2016 EDs are fixed? I've completed all recalls but the most recent as parts are backordered.

I've got a disappointing 2015 ED, and after the FCA AEM recall and update. I have poor performance and this is not the same truck that I bought.

Dangerous turbo lag when cold. Drastically, reduced mpg, before AEM 26-30 mpg... After barely getting 18-19mpg. I, too, have a random horrible exhaust smell when stopping at a light.

I've been to the dealership more with this truck than ALL trucks I've ever owned put together.

Over the past five years, I have nothing good to say about Ram and the lying Chuckleheads at FCA.
Get a tune from GDE or a Canadian tune. I have stage 1 MR Tuning and a GDE compliant tune. Both are great
 

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I agree with most here on avoiding earlier years. I say this in that you really need to know the history of the truck to find a "good one".

The first and most important question is this; "Was the truck GDE tuned most of it's life?"

When you look at an untuned Ecodiesels intake manifold you'll see what we all mean. IF I was to buy a used 2015 Ecodiesel, I would have to know the answers to these questions, so your search will be reduced to private sales only. You'll never get any info about tunes from a used car lot sales dude.

Also, you need to know this, is how was the truck driven. It has been obvious to me since April of 2018, when I bought my 2017 Ecodiesel, and joined the group, that GDE tuned Ecodiesels that tow frequently, or have lots of freeway miles, do very well with much less issues.

It's the untuned/undeleted trucks that are used for grocery getters, used for short cold trips in winter, that never tow, that have the more often issues. That first oil change at 5400 miles with my Ecodiesel, was the blackest engine oil I've ever seen. I worked construction in my life, I know what used diesel motor oil looks like, and it don't look that black. So black it looks dry while in a bucket.

After adding the GDE tune, engine oil at 7500 miles still has that amber look, you could still read the hash marks on the dipstick. The tune is an electronic delete of sorts, you can leave the parts on and have your cake too. Turning that nasty EGR off certainly improved things immensely, and imo, a requirement for buying used.

To buy an unknown and untuned older Ecodiesel is asking for trouble. But even with a tune, the reliability factor was not good for Ecodiesels. But one with a fresh engine would be a way around the private sales, but I would require proof of when and how many miles ago the engine was replaced. Slap a tune in it, and you're good to go.

Last April I move up to a 2021 2500 Cummins Tradesman. These engines are hyper reliable, living in Alaska this is important to me. You do not hear much about them blowing up, or any other problems. In the last year I've heard of a couple of engine failures, one had a hole in the block. Compared to the early Gen Ecodiesel, well, there is no comparison.

I agree with the other guys, take a good look at the newer Ecodiesels, you might be money ahead in the long run.

Good luck on your search.
 
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