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Discussion Starter · #421 ·
My 2019 RAM 3500 called for a transmission fluid change at 30k miles, towing or not. That seemed remarkably soon for an HD trans designed for towing.
I think the owner's manual for the Ram 1500 recommends 100,000 mile service intervals for the transmission. Vern has an estimated 750,000 miles on his factory transmission. He sticks to the 90,000 - 100,000 mile trany fluid intervals.

I don't log that many miles, so I'll stick with 5 year/50,000 mile intervals, whichever comes first.
 
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Thanks biodiesel. I assumed the break-in period was the consumption issue. I will get a quart to keep it topped up. Do you know off-hand if the hatch area of the dipstick represents a full quart?

I didn't tow until roughly 1000 miles; tried to vary my RPM speeds a fair amount during that time. I like an engine that does not consume oil.
from what i know about engine break in: variable RPM and moderate loading to get the rings to seat. from what I recall on the dynos with race car engines, they do variable low to mid RPM revs for a while and get it up to operating temperature, and then by that time, they put her under full load and do full pulls to break it in. Load is your friend I was told to get the rings to seat. Realistically, who knows how long they're run at factory though... and it's also almost conflicting with how they say to baby the diff the first 500 miles or whatever too..

I recall low to full area (hashmark area) on the dipstick being roughly 1 quart.

I used 1 quart from 3 miles odometer reading when I drove off the dealers lot to 1,205 miles at the first oil change. That blew my mind.
Then I used another 2 quarts during the 1,205 mile reading up to around 7,000 miles maybe. And that last 3-4k before my last oil change I didn't notice much oil loss.

Yea, the book says oil consumption is normal during break in. I get that. But I wish the dealer would mention that. I can only imagine everyone out there that doesn't check their oil or do their own oil changes... YIKES!
At least my audi had a low oil level indicator. Ram really needs to integrate one of those.

I'll keep y'all posted how the next 10k miles go on this oil change and if it uses any.
 

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On another note, my truck now has a whopping 1600 miles on it and I noticed while checking the oil, it has fallen to just below the level of the hash marks on the dipstick. The oil is still remarkably clear for a diesel, but it apparently is consuming oil. That said, what is the easiest oil to get my hands on to "top off" the truck?

Thanks
Take that truck out and make it work it's A$$ off on a real tough hill climb with trailer if possible even repeatedly 3 - 4 times. The Engine rings and Cylinder walls are not broken in sounds like very light duty use and quite high oil consumption.
 

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Discussion Starter · #425 ·
I went out and checked the dipstick on my 2020. We took delivery of the truck in August. The factory fill is about 8 months old. We drive the truck approximately once every 3 weeks or so. The odometer has 3,057 miles. The oil is much darker in this picture than what it really is. Overall, the oil is still very clean looking. I'm guessing the oil is at least a 1/2 quart below the full mark.

 
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I went out and checked the dipstick on my 2020. We took delivery of the truck in August. The factory fill is about 8 months old. We drive the truck approximately once every 3 weeks or so. The odometer has 3,057 miles. The oil is much darker in this picture than what it really is. Overall, the oil is still very clean looking. I'm guessing the oil is at least a 1/2 quart below the full mark.

You’re guessing wrong. It might be a tenth of a quart low. 8.5 quarts maybe hits 1/3 the hatch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #427 ·
You’re guessing wrong. It might be a tenth of a quart low. 8.5 quarts maybe hits 1/3 the hatch.
When the truck was new, the oil level was approximately in the middle of the textured knurl. I just assumed the top of the knurl was the full mark. :unsure:

I noticed the etched line (as seen in my photo). Is that considered the "do not go below this mark' line? The line is only on one side of the dipstick.
 
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When the truck was new, the oil level was approximately in the middle of the textured knurl. I just assumed the top of the knurl was the full mark. :unsure:

I noticed the etched line (as seen in my photo). Is that considered the "do not go below this mark' line? The line is only on one side of the dipstick.
Good eye. That etch mark would not hold oil if the fill level were below it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #429 ·
Good eye. That etch mark would not hold oil if the fill level were below it.
Agreed. I'll look in the owner's manual to see if there are directions on how to read this particular dipstick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #430 ·
The owner's manual is pretty much worthless. Here's what it says:

There are four possible dipstick types.
*Crosshatched zone
*Crosshatched zone marked SAFE
*Crosshatched zone marked with MIN at the low end of the range and MAX at the high end of the range
*Crosshatched zone marked with dimples at the MIN and the MAX ends of the range

NOTE: Always maintain the oil level within the crosshatch markings on the dipstick.
 

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Guys, Advance Auto carries FRAM brand oil:
FRAM Full Synthetic 5w40 Euro Motor Oil, which meets Chrysler spec MS-12991
$7.49 per quart
$21.99 per 5 quarts
It is in-stock at my local store. In fact, using their vehicle lookup tool, it showed this as the only possible option.
I don't have a lot of regard for FRAM oil filters, but the FRAM oil appears to be made and bottled by Amalie Oil Company, from PA or FL, and generally good reputation. I'm thinking of buying a quart just to top my oil with until the first change.
 
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Discussion Starter · #432 ·
Guys, Advance Auto carries FRAM brand oil:
FRAM Full Synthetic 5w40 Euro Motor Oil, which meets Chrysler spec MS-12991
Good find! I just added it to the list on the front page.
 
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One word of caution...I went to Advance Auto and they indeed had the FRAM Euro oil. However, the bottle I looked at did not contain Chrysler MS-12991 spec. It had another Chrysler spec but not that one. I assume the 12991 spec must be very recent for that oil since the website shows it, and maybe this particular quart was older but it did not show it.

Since they also had Penzoil Euro Platinum, with the correct spec, I bought that instead.
 
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Discussion Starter · #434 ·
Since they also had Penzoil Euro Platinum, with the correct spec, I bought that instead.
The Pennzoil Platinum Euro 5W-40 seems to be a really good oil. Someone on the Facebook group posted their Pennzoil UOA and it looked excellent.

Side Note: I just found out today that I have two free dealer oil changes. I'm curious which oil they will use. I need to contact my Service Advisor and see what she says.
 

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Side Note: I just found out today that I have two free dealer oil changes. I'm curious which oil they will use. I need to contact my Service Advisor and see what she says.
"Bulk 5w40 synthetic"

I am so distrustful of dealer service; I avoid it unless absolutely necessary. Dealerships and OEM's market their service as "expertly trained, factory-certified technicians" using "only the best" for your vehicle, to justify the high hourly rates. Many people don't realize a dealer service department has many levels of technicians. The folks that change oil and tires are typically paid very poorly and have virtually zero training. "Service Advisors" seem to be pretty useless too. It used to be the dealership Service Manager was the guy with the most training and experience, and he or she would answer customer's questions and schedule service. The advisors are a newer thing, within the last 15-20 years...and they are basically nothing other than order takers and schedulers, sadly. A service advisor can look up your vehicle on the computer and tell you what the factory thinks needs to be done to your vehicle based upon mileage, but that's about it.

A friend of mine owned a 2002 Toyota Tacoma he bought new, and diligently had it serviced at the Toyota dealer he purchased it from, for many years. One day he dropped his truck off for a routine oil change; picked his truck up and paid the cashier at the dealer. He made it about a mile before noticing the engine didn't sound right, and then noticed the red oil pressure light was on. He drove back to the dealer...they drained the oil and changed the filter, but forgot to add new oil! They gave him a "complimentary" next oil change. Somehow the engine survived.
 

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Discussion Starter · #436 ·
"Bulk 5w40 synthetic"
Not necessarily. Dealerships were required to used Rotella T6 on the 2014 - 2019 EcoDiesel. Someone recently said their dealer put in Pennzoil Platinum Euro 5W-40 in their 3rd gen EcoDiesel, which makes sense. Stellantis and Pennzoil have a contract.

I am so distrustful of dealer service; I avoid it unless absolutely necessary.
You should be distrustful until you get confirmation. I've heard some horror stories about dealership service departments. Quality techs seem to be hit and miss. I live in diesel country, so we have several diesel techs at my dealer. One of the diesel techs is assigned to the EcoDiesel, which is what he works on all day long. I've gotten to know him pretty well. He's done just about every repair there is on the EcoDiesel including swapping engines. Without question, he's probably the best or second best EcoDiesel mechanic in my 150 mile radius. The other mechanic is in Albuquerque. The dealer tech in Albuquerque is also assigned to the EcoDiesel only. He is also very knowledgeable and has done just about every repair there is on the EcoDiesel. I would trust both guys with any repair.

I recently had the water pump replaced in my 2015 under the power train warranty. He took me back to the shop and showed me what it looked like. I couldn't believe how much stuff that had to be removed to replace the water pump. From his experience, the leak usually comes from one of the o-rings. But since the job is so labor intensive, they go ahead and replace the water pump and all the o-rings at the same time.

Either way, if I need major repairs outside of my warranty, I'll be going to the dealer in Albuquerque or the dealer in Farmington. Both are excellent mechanics and know a lot about the EcoDiesel. Both dealers will work with the customer on fair pricing, too.
 
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If you can get a good, trusted tech...then it becomes worth it. I live in New Hampshire and the EcoDiesel is a rare breed. Even the Heavy Duty trucks are only about 50% diesel. A lot of people cannot believe why someone would buy a gas powered HD, but a lot of people do. My nearest dealer was recently bought out last year. Prior to the new ownership, they sold zero diesels, unless a customer special ordered. EcoDiesels don't sell a lot anyway, and aside from basic principles, a Cummins diesel tech has no idea what they are doing on an EcoDiesel.
 

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Sadly, Dealer Techs are becoming a rarity in general - simply no money to be made at the dealer. The issue now is a lack of experience, old techs who don’t wish to bother, and a toxic environment created by time cuts designed to reduce the manufacturer’s expense.
 

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Discussion Starter · #439 ·
If you can get a good, trusted tech...then it becomes worth it.
Plus, the OE part and labor is warrantied. To save money, I will buy the OE part myself and have the dealer install it.

I live in New Hampshire and the EcoDiesel is a rare breed. Even the Heavy Duty trucks are only about 50% diesel. A lot of people cannot believe why someone would buy a gas powered HD, but a lot of people do. My nearest dealer was recently bought out last year. Prior to the new ownership, they sold zero diesels, unless a customer special ordered. EcoDiesels don't sell a lot anyway, and aside from basic principles, a Cummins diesel tech has no idea what they are doing on an EcoDiesel.
I've noticed that location is a big factor, which is why I started off by saying, "I live in diesel country, so we have several diesel techs at my dealer." I would guess that my two dealers (Farmington and Albuquerque) probably average selling two EcoDiesel vehicles per week.
 

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Discussion Starter · #440 ·
Sadly, Dealer Techs are becoming a rarity in general - simply no money to be made at the dealer. The issue now is a lack of experience, old techs who don’t wish to bother, and a toxic environment created by time cuts designed to reduce the manufacturer’s expense.
A lot of diesel techs here in New Mexico work in the mines and oil fields, but those can be long hours. Our dealerships appear to be fairly laid back, but I obviously don't see what happens behind the scenes. I know that diesel techs get paid pretty good money at our dealerships compared to other techs. Regardless, there doesn't seem to be a high turnover rate.
 
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