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Discussion Starter #1
Just wonder how our 1500's would compare to 3500 when it comes to a frame twist.
When I was looking to buy my 1st truck I had a look at Ford and GMC. Neither was appealing to me. Ford finish was to cheap and with GM I did not like how fenders were square.

 

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I Well I think this is interesting but fail to understand its real world relevance. Steel is elastic until it yields and the flexing of the frame is all part of the feel and suspension of the truck. I cannot imagine when I wil drive my truck or any truck into a situation when one wheel will be off the ground and then worry about which doors or tailgates open. Clearly the torsional rigidity of the Ram frame is greater but I am not convinced that makes it better or stronger. A more useful test might have been with the rated load in the bed. Anyhow, my 2 cents worth is this is a clever gimic but doesn't really tell me anything about the long term reliability of the frame and suspension one way or the other. As a structural engineer I rather like the flexibility of the FORD. It seems more likely to keep all 4 wheels in contact with the ground no matter what the conditions. The one in the air on the Ram sure is not going to help you move forward!

Help me understand what this test is meant o prove or show, in terms of real world performance, reliability etc.
 

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Steel is made to flex, it helps relieve stress on certain points.

Years ago my work territory included lower Manhattan which included the old World trade buildings. On a very windy day on the top floors you could take a visual point between the two buildings and watch how much they swayed in the wind, scary. Some people would get seasick. On the mid level floors most big doors had to be open as the sway of the building might momentarily lock them closed from the flex and it creaked alot with the sway.

That flex on the Ford is crazy.
 

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Those are not Ram 1500 Ecodiesels. Send that to another forum that might deal with those heavy-duty pickups.

As an aside, the both did pretty good considering how they were intentionally twisted. How often does that happen in real-world usage? Silly test.
 

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I agree with Howie. The test(?) is of no relevance to the real world normal operation of either truck. How much the frame twists is not directly related to the design goal, which is load carrying and towing capability.
 

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I never thing this was relavant either until two years ago on my really deer hunting trip. I had an F250 at the time and to get to our hunting spots we go down a lot of dirt roads and are far from help. I was driving down a road I had been down a month before. There were some frozen puddles that I had to drive over. The month before the buddies were thawed and about 6 inches deep. I assumed they would still be the same depth. Well about half way down the road I was crossing the ice and it broke. My truck fell into 2.5 feet of water. Luckily for me it was lifted on 37's or I would have flooded the cab. Little did I know a bunch of local kids had gone mudding in the puddle the week before. Since the bottom of the puddle was rutted the truck was not sitting level and all the tools I would need to get the truck unstuck were in the bed safely under the tonneau cover. With the twisted frame the tailgate wouldn't open and I had to cut the tonnaeu cover to get in the bed.

Moral of the story, you may never need it, but if you do it won't be in a good situation.


I Well I think this is interesting but fail to understand its real world relevance. Steel is elastic until it yields and the flexing of the frame is all part of the feel and suspension of the truck. I cannot imagine when I wil drive my truck or any truck into a situation when one wheel will be off the ground and then worry about which doors or tailgates open. Clearly the torsional rigidity of the Ram frame is greater but I am not convinced that makes it better or stronger. A more useful test might have been with the rated load in the bed. Anyhow, my 2 cents worth is this is a clever gimic but doesn't really tell me anything about the long term reliability of the frame and suspension one way or the other. As a structural engineer I rather like the flexibility of the FORD. It seems more likely to keep all 4 wheels in contact with the ground no matter what the conditions. The one in the air on the Ram sure is not going to help you move forward!

Help me understand what this test is meant o prove or show, in terms of real world performance, reliability etc.
 

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Apparently, HD trucks are rock crawling trucks these days......

Common sense would tell you to use the right tool for the job. If you need flex to go bouldering or equivalent maybe a HD isn't the right tool.....
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I Well I think this is interesting but fail to understand its real world relevance. Steel is elastic until it yields and the flexing of the frame is all part of the feel and suspension of the truck. I cannot imagine when I wil drive my truck or any truck into a situation when one wheel will be off the ground and then worry about which doors or tailgates open. Clearly the torsional rigidity of the Ram frame is greater but I am not convinced that makes it better or stronger. A more useful test might have been with the rated load in the bed. Anyhow, my 2 cents worth is this is a clever gimic but doesn't really tell me anything about the long term reliability of the frame and suspension one way or the other. As a structural engineer I rather like the flexibility of the FORD. It seems more likely to keep all 4 wheels in contact with the ground no matter what the conditions. The one in the air on the Ram sure is not going to help you move forward!

Help me understand what this test is meant o prove or show, in terms of real world performance, reliability etc.
Sure steel should twist but not to a point where where it could cause permanent damage. I've taken my truck on some very bad back country roads and if my frame was to twist to a point like Ford did, I don't think I would be driving my ED today. I'm sure I would have hard time explaining to insurance company why my frame was bent.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Steel is made to flex, it helps relieve stress on certain points.

Years ago my work territory included lower Manhattan which included the old World trade buildings. On a very windy day on the top floors you could take a visual point between the two buildings and watch how much they swayed in the wind, scary. Some people would get seasick. On the mid level floors most big doors had to be open as the sway of the building might momentarily lock them closed from the flex and it creaked alot with the sway.

That flex on the Ford is crazy.

Here is another good video.

 

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Discussion Starter #11
Those are not Ram 1500 Ecodiesels. Send that to another forum that might deal with those heavy-duty pickups.

As an aside, the both did pretty good considering how they were intentionally twisted. How often does that happen in real-world usage? Silly test.

Hold on. If you had a chance to read what I posted then you would notice that i asked : " Just wonder how our 1500's would compare to 3500 when it comes to a frame twist."
 

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Those are not Ram 1500 Ecodiesels. Send that to another forum that might deal with those heavy-duty pickups.

As an aside, the both did pretty good considering how they were intentionally twisted. How often does that happen in real-world usage? Silly test.
Captainmal, here have a image.png ;)
 
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