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Here is the break down:

On a certified scale.

Front axle: 3740 LB
Rear axle: 4020 LB
Trailer axle: 7680 LB
GVW: 15,440 LB

This camper is made for the new half ton pickups with the 5'4" box.
Have 3.55 gears
 

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Here is the break down:

On a certified scale.

Front axle: 3740 LB
Rear axle: 4020 LB
Trailer axle: 7680 LB
GVW: 15,440 LB

This camper is made for the new half ton pickups with the 5'4" box.
Have 3.55 gears
Very nice , I also have 3.55 gears and looking at buying a jayco jay flight 28BHBE 7300 lbs dry and a max load of 9200 lbs , I think once loaded I should be around 8500 lbs that would be 1200 lbs of cargo " seem's like a lot of cargo :) "
when driving have you been threw any mountain's or anything with a 5 to 6 % grade ? I'm sure she would work a little harder on those grade's but thought i would ask how she did , I'm looking at taking my first trip once I get the trailer threw the GA, Tennessee mountain range

Thank's
mike
 
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Be careful with "dry" trailer weights, that's usually with no options installed and minimal trim inside. I had a 5800 lb "dry" toy hauler that was over 7k with no fluids in it by the time you add in propane tanks, spare tire, AC, generator, cushions, TV, Microwave, etc.. Not sure if all manufacturers are like this but I know quite a few fudge the numbers to get them sales in the half ton market
 

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Not much for 5 or 6% grades here in Nebraska. But we do have some hills that are around that but not for to long maybe a mile at most. It only seems to shift down one gear and that is at the top usually, about 1800 rpms up to 2200rpms . I seem to drop about 1 to 2 mpg. but when I'm on the flats then it a can be anywhere from 15.3 to 16.8 mpg thus I end up with 14.2 mpg overall at the end of the trip hand calculated after fill up.
 

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This trailer was pretty close to the specified weights when we weighted it after we had bought it. But a little more when we filled all the fluids up.
 

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Thank you
 
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Be careful with "dry" trailer weights, that's usually with no options installed and minimal trim inside. I had a 5800 lb "dry" toy hauler that was over 7k with no fluids in it by the time you add in propane tanks, spare tire, AC, generator, cushions, TV, Microwave, etc.. Not sure if all manufacturers are like this but I know quite a few fudge the numbers to get them sales in the half ton market
Thank you , dealer dry weight is @ 6400 lbs but I have done some research and found out its about 800 lbs off with the options I want :)
 
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Thanks for all the information you guys have on this forum. It has been great to read up when deciding to buy an Ecodiesel. We got a Crew Cab Tradesman 4x4 a couple months ago and it has been a great truck.

I wanted to give back a little with my first post and add a real life data point to this discussion.

I pack a used 2003 FWC Hawk on the new Ecodiesel and you would not know it is on there. Even before I installed airlift aftermarket bags on the basic suspension it would handle, break, go down the road great. Getting 21 mpg at freeway speeds to boot. I had a couple outings taking full water tanks, gear, dogs, people etc. and it did not feel any worse going down the road than on an empty camper. This makes sense. I also have a VW - a Golf TDI and its payload is close to 1000 lbs!

Anyone who says you can't put one of these light weight FWC or AT slide in campers into the new RAM just hasn't tried. I am very considerate and an engineer. I know how an overloaded vehicle looks and feels like.... I live in the SF bay area. If you are local or in the area, you are welcome to come visit and see my setup and we will take it for a spin! also travel quite a bit with the Camper, so I can even visit you maybe on a road trip! BTW: My hawk came off a 1st gen Tundra (!) that had air bags and no other modifications.

Thanks everyone and HAPPY CAMPING! :cool:

George
 

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Thanks for all the information you guys have on this forum. It has been great to read up when deciding to buy an Ecodiesel. We got a Crew Cab Tradesman 4x4 a couple months ago and it has been a great truck.

I wanted to give back a little with my first post and add a real life data point to this discussion.

I pack a used 2003 FWC Hawk on the new Ecodiesel and you would not know it is on there. Even before I installed airlift aftermarket bags on the basic suspension it would handle, break, go down the road great. Getting 21 mpg at freeway speeds to boot. I had a couple outings taking full water tanks, gear, dogs, people etc. and it did not feel any worse going down the road than on an empty camper. This makes sense. I also have a VW - a Golf TDI and its payload is close to 1000 lbs!

Anyone who says you can't put one of these light weight FWC or AT slide in campers into the new RAM just hasn't tried. I am very considerate and an engineer. I know how an overloaded vehicle looks and feels like.... I live in the SF bay area. If you are local or in the area, you are welcome to come visit and see my setup and we will take it for a spin! also travel quite a bit with the Camper, so I can even visit you maybe on a road trip! BTW: My hawk came off a 1st gen Tundra (!) that had air bags and no other modifications.

Thanks everyone and HAPPY CAMPING! :cool:

George
Greetings. Good to hear your truck and camper are working out. I might have taken you up on that offer for a spin a year ago.

Seat-of-the-pants impressions are one thing but every truck and driver are different, so some actual weights would help. What is your Payload rating on the vehicle's placard? What does the truck and camper weigh dry and fully loaded (state number of passengers, gear and fluids)? What tires and pressures do you run? Why did you install air bags if it handled "great" without them?

As for who has said you should not put a slide-in camper on a Crew Cab 1500, that would be RAM. Also, I determined that the factory air suspension is not up to the task. Of course, several owners of the coil suspension have mounted campers to their satisfaction so there is room to play.
 

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The camper dry is under 700 lbs per manufacturer
The payload on the door jamb shows just under 1200 IIRC
That leaves 500 pounds for gear and people. You know that's not going to work, unless you have 4 people weighing 125 lbs ...
- Water and drinks: 200 lbs
- 4 people: 700 lbs
- 2 dogs, dog food, kennels: 150 lbs
- food, gear: 300 lbs

So, 850 lbs over with 300 lbs of gear. It could even be 1000+ lbs over if the gear was heavier, who knows. I do try to stay light and not pack it to the gills, i.e. not fill up the water tank when I am out only for a night or two.

I bought the air bags before I got the camper. I think they are of course a good idea to help increase payload capacity as they significantly stiffen the spring, reduce sag and roll. My feeling is that the coils supporting such a nice ride are the main reason these trucks are rated very low in payload. You support those coils during hauling and you easily double payload. Next you will hit some limits on tires and axles?

I am happy with this setup. The low center of gravity on these popups surely helps. If you go to a truck camper forum, you will see some crazy stuff people rig up. I.e. Tacomas, Rangers hauling slide in campers, sticking out over the tail gate, or 1 ton trucks with a hard side camper twice as big as the poor rig! I hope this helps.

Cheers,

George
 

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Thanks for all the information you guys have on this forum. It has been great to read up when deciding to buy an Ecodiesel. We got a Crew Cab Tradesman 4x4 a couple months ago and it has been a great truck.

I wanted to give back a little with my first post and add a real life data point to this discussion.

I pack a used 2003 FWC Hawk on the new Ecodiesel and you would not know it is on there. Even before I installed airlift aftermarket bags on the basic suspension it would handle, break, go down the road great. Getting 21 mpg at freeway speeds to boot. I had a couple outings taking full water tanks, gear, dogs, people etc. and it did not feel any worse going down the road than on an empty camper. This makes sense. I also have a VW - a Golf TDI and its payload is close to 1000 lbs!

Anyone who says you can't put one of these light weight FWC or AT slide in campers into the new RAM just hasn't tried. I am very considerate and an engineer. I know how an overloaded vehicle looks and feels like.... I live in the SF bay area. If you are local or in the area, you are welcome to come visit and see my setup and we will take it for a spin! also travel quite a bit with the Camper, so I can even visit you maybe on a road trip! BTW: My hawk came off a 1st gen Tundra (!) that had air bags and no other modifications.

Thanks everyone and HAPPY CAMPING! :cool:

George
Hi George,

I think your experience is pretty close to mine. I found the truck to be capable, stable, and feeling safe when loaded with a light weight camper. Here is my trip report

I would suggest that you stop by a state truck stop or a Cat Scale on your next trip and weigh the truck loaded. I think you are underestimating the weights fo the camper dry.
 

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Hi Mark and all - Where are these CAT scales? At truck stops? How much is it to weigh a rig? I have the original purchase docs for the camper and it shows high 600lbs range for the dry weight from the factory. It is a very basic equipped camper with propane stove, manual pump water faucet, ice box and roof fan the only options. (no heat, no shower, potty etc. etc.) Where I am sure I underestimate is "gear". That catch all is probably 500 lbs+.

Cheers,

George
 

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The camper dry is under 700 lbs per manufacturer
The payload on the door jamb shows just under 1200 IIRC
That leaves 500 pounds for gear and people. You know that's not going to work, unless you have 4 people weighing 125 lbs ...
- Water and drinks: 200 lbs
- 4 people: 700 lbs
- 2 dogs, dog food, kennels: 150 lbs
- food, gear: 300 lbs

So, 850 lbs over with 300 lbs of gear. It could even be 1000+ lbs over if the gear was heavier, who knows. I do try to stay light and not pack it to the gills, i.e. not fill up the water tank when I am out only for a night or two.

I bought the air bags before I got the camper. I think they are of course a good idea to help increase payload capacity as they significantly stiffen the spring, reduce sag and roll. My feeling is that the coils supporting such a nice ride are the main reason these trucks are rated very low in payload. You support those coils during hauling and you easily double payload. Next you will hit some limits on tires and axles?

I am happy with this setup. The low center of gravity on these popups surely helps. If you go to a truck camper forum, you will see some crazy stuff people rig up. I.e. Tacomas, Rangers hauling slide in campers, sticking out over the tail gate, or 1 ton trucks with a hard side camper twice as big as the poor rig! I hope this helps.

Cheers,

George
Your estimated load is 2050 lbs which I'll bet is light. The current dry weight of a "base" Hawk is 895 lbs per the manufacturer. That includes a finished interior, stove, 2 10-lb propane tanks (full), an icebox, and a 20-gal fresh water tank (empty). Although your camper is 12 years old, it probably weighs significantly more than 700 lbs dry unless it is a shell, perhaps as much as 1100+ lbs with typical options. Using your numbers the total weight is right at the combined axle ratings, so unless you have an evenly balanced load then one of the axles will be overloaded. That is something you may want to think about as an engineer. It is easy to find out your actual weight rather than guessing.

Note that air bags do not increase payload capacity, they only provide a more controlled ride when heavily loaded. Air bags may make a heavy load feel safe but we have to be aware that a false sense of security can kick us in the ass at any moment. We also have to pay close attention to tire pressure when loaded; most truck camper owners go with LT tires which are better suited to loads. Besides the axles and tires, other potential limits involve stopping, cooling and driveline durability.

Yes, a pop-up truck camper helps lower the COG which is a big plus. You live close to the FWC factory which is one of the most popular brands. The setup should serve you well, just don't put on any weight! Happy camping. :D
 

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Hi Mark and all - Where are these CAT scales? At truck stops? How much is it to weigh a rig? I have the original purchase docs for the camper and it shows high 600lbs range for the dry weight from the factory. It is a very basic equipped camper with propane stove, manual pump water faucet, ice box and roof fan the only options. (no heat, no shower, potty etc. etc.) Where I am sure I underestimate is "gear". That catch all is probably 500 lbs+.

Cheers,

George
Scales are scattered around many places including some truck stops, garbage dumps, quarries, and anywhere big rigs need to be weighed (many are private although you can always ask). In Oregon there are DOT scales on many highways that can be used for free if they are unmanned or closed. For your area you might try checking CAT Scale Locator | CAT Scale and Certified Public Scale Locator For Your DITY Move.
 

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I tow an approximately 8300 lb travel trailer loaded with a hitch weight of 1100 lbs. with no problems what so ever. I added air bags and timbren spring assists. I've been as far as 1200 miles round trip. I'm confident in our trucks!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I just joined this forum in an effort to make up my mind on which truck to get. I've been reading a lot of pages of this thread. I am almost sure that I'll get the ED. My story is I've been pulling a Lance trailer model 1985 with a Honda Ridgeline all over western Oregon and as far Kelowna B C where you have to go over the Coquihalla highway for the last 2 camping season. The little yellow sticker on the door of the trailer says 4190 lbs. with two full propane tank and 1120lbs of cargo (I guess that would include the fresh water tank full too.) I have an E2 WDH because is such a short wheel base. I adore camping and to cook while camping anything to a traditional Thanksgiving diner to pizza. I carry at least 3 or 4 Dutch Ovens cooking table briquettes, a portable gas stove. In total weight of cooking gear maybe 250lbs. maybe a littler more, that is split between the Honda and the TT. We got me and the wife at the dog at about 450lbs. I carry a little water in the tanks for roadside emergencies, and that's it. Like I said after reading the payload thread it's got me wondering if I need a bigger rig? In addition of going over about 20 pages of "show your rig towing ", it sorta convinced me that the ED would be the choice. The Honda did ok. It would drop down to second and third going up the Siskiyou Pass . On the flat it did fine but with a 22 gallon tank and at 9 or 10 MPG I'm sure I could do a lot better with the ED. What are your thoughts ? Would the ED make the cut?
 

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I just joined this forum in an effort to make up my mind on which truck to get. I've been reading a lot of pages of this thread. I am almost sure that I'll get the ED. My story is I've been pulling a Lance trailer model 1985 with a Honda Ridgeline all over western Oregon and as far Kelowna B C where you have to go over the Coquihalla highway for the last 2 camping season. The little yellow sticker on the door of the trailer says 4190 lbs. with two full propane tank and 1120lbs of cargo (I guess that would include the fresh water tank full too.) I have an E2 WDH because is such a short wheel base. I adore camping and to cook while camping anything to a traditional Thanksgiving diner to pizza. I carry at least 3 or 4 Dutch Ovens cooking table briquettes, a portable gas stove. In total weight of cooking gear maybe 250lbs. maybe a littler more, that is split between the Honda and the TT. We got me and the wife at the dog at about 450lbs. I carry a little water in the tanks for roadside emergencies, and that's it. Like I said after reading the payload thread it's got me wondering if I need a bigger rig? In addition of going over about 20 pages of "show your rig towing ", it sorta convinced me that the ED would be the choice. The Honda did ok. It would drop down to second and third going up the Siskiyou Pass . On the flat it did fine but with a 22 gallon tank and at 9 or 10 MPG I'm sure I could do a lot better with the ED. What are your thoughts ? Would the ED make the cut?

I've pulled my 6000lbs boat/trailer plus cargo a few times between Vancouver and Kelowna in the summer on the Coquihalla Highway and the 97C connector, as well as the Crow's Nest between Penticton and Hope, During some of the longer climbs my speed would drop from 65mph down to perhaps 50mph in 5th gear, temps rose a bit but stayed within operating limits, I have the 3.55 rear axle gear ratio which suits me fine at this trailer weight but the 3.92 would be something to look into.
Sounds like your trailer and gear are pretty close to what I have, you should be fine with the ED.
 
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