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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Is anyone looking at installing a catch can? I have read a lot about this one but also read it is big and hard to find space for it, at least it is tight on the GC. Provent 200 Oil Catch Can Diesel
Anyone prefer another brand?

Just noticed I spelled PCV wrong. it is a big 3 letter word.
 

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Thanks for the information.

Really don't know much about the "catch cans". This is the first I saw but have heard of them. $80 for a filter that you get ??? every 15- 20,000 miles is a bummer. No clue what the can costs.

The whole thing is worth exploring along with the impact on warranty issues at the start. Sorry I can't answer your question.
 

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Some people install them on their CRDs, but not quite that one. 1st, it has NOTHING to do with the EGR. This is the PCV valve. What this does is catch the oil vapors that are in the air from the PCV valve and not put them oil vapors into the engine. It is suppose to capture the oil and send it back into the engine.
 

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Heck with it. We are talking diesels..... let it drink the oil. (lol)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
the provent can is around $180 I think. I know what you mean $80 for the filter is steep. I have seen other aluminum cans but I need to research more.
Here is a good expansion I found on another forum. This is a copy paste not my words.

What a Provent does is in fact remove oil out of that crankcase slurry/vapor coming out of the PCV valve as stated. It has mainly to do with the EGR as these EGR exhaust gasses have soot (particulates) and this soot mixes with the oily vapor now coming in as intake compressed air and 1) clogs the intake plentum 2) drives up EGTs 3) cokes up on the exhaust side of the turbo freezing the needing-to-move vanes and stuck vanes then create over boost 3) cokes up exhaust valves leading to premature wear... (there is more!).It depends on how aggressive the EGR is set which probably is high as big brother government's EPA has these special standards for light diesel in the USA.Proper thing to do is eliminate EGR but 1)voids warranty 2) stopping EGR will imbalance th rest of the exhaust system ( DPF, Regen, SCR ) and 3)is unlawful.
 
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Sounds interesting. As Capt said it warrants more investigation. I would think that if it is that beneficial, either VM or Chrysler would have engineered this into the ED package. More homework. Will keep a watch on this thread to learn what other people have to contribute about this subject. Nailem gave me some good info to peak my curiosity.
 

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The purpose of an EGR is to ensure that the crankcase doesn't become a high pressure zone. When this occurs, seals don't last long and the engine starts weeping oil. Modern engines apply a vacuum to the crankcase so it's a mild low pressure zone. This is good for your seals but it can suck oily vapor into the intake tract.

Here's what the marketing dept's don't tell you. An engine in good repair shouldn't be venting gases into it's crankcase so there shouldn't be squat for oily vapor going into the intake tract. So mostly this is an issue for old and worn engines. Think about how high pressure gases might get into the block....combustion gases either have to get by the rings or get by the valve seals, neither of which should be happening to much of an extent on a healthy engine.

The cheap and easy solution is to just replace your PCV every once-and-now so it can't get gummed up and allow the engine to get pressurized inside and blow out seals. Otherwise don't worry about it. Next time you're poking around the hood of a car, disconnect the hose from the PCV, and rev the engine a bit. Assuming the engine isn't old an worn, you'll feel darn little air blowing out and it will be relatively clean stuff.
 

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On my 2012 Cummins the crankcase ventilation is plumbed into the intake side of the turbo, through the intercooler then into the motor to be burned. There is a filter on top of the valve cover that is supposed to catch any oil that comes from the crankcase I guess. That filter needs to be changed every 64k miles I believe if not sooner. I don't like it at all, it coats everything with a light film of oil. No telling what the inside of the intercooler, intake plenum or grid heaters looks like. Best thing to do is just remove the hose from the turbo and let it vent naturally. My 2000 Cummins just vented out from the front of the engine, ever see a big rig with a little rubber hose dangling just behind the front bumper? That is the old style venting which left drips of oil on the ground. The EPA stopped that.
 

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I don't know much about this topic but I do know from reading another ram forum that a lot of the hemi ram guys are running catch cans on the 5.7


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I don't know much about this topic but I do know from reading another ram forum that a lot of the hemi ram guys are running catch cans on the 5.7


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
They run them on the Hemi's because the Dodge seems to think losing one quart of oil about every five thousands miles is normal. This picture is from DT and the member posted it after 10K from when the C/C was install.

:p
 

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