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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of the reasons I wanted to get a truck was to haul lumber. I do woodworking as a hobby and it is great to not have to rent a vehicle to bring home a load of wood.

Today I picked up a few boards and was trying to figure out the best way to pack them in the bed. These were about 8ft long, 6-10" wide. I have the 5'7" bed.

I placed them in the bed diagonally, with the far end on the floor of the bed, and the near end resting on top of the tailgate (which was in the normal "up" position.) I held them down with ratchet straps, which was probably overkill.

I wanted to see from other truck owners how they normally haul lumber. Gate up or down? Orientation of boards? Any other tips? Thanks!
 

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Gate up, loaded straight into the bed is how I do it. Often don't have a choice as I'm carrying sheet goods as well. I have had over 700lbs resting on the tailgate without issue. Straps not necessarily needed, but it will be safer should an accident occur. With a heavier load you should drop the gate and strap it down. Any loads that extend more than a few feet from your tailgate should be flagged in red. I don't advocate putting anything through the sliding rear window, regardless of length.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Good tips, thanks Kressman. No sheet goods today, but when I do need some it will be nice to just slide the plywood right in rather than strap it to a car roof (shudder....)
 

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Sometimes I put the gate down and bring a 48" long 4x4. Lay everything flat in the bed and then lay the 4x4 across the top to give the retched strap a more downward angle at the anchor points. Good way to secure long stuff you don't want to risk bending (delicate lumber and Sheetrock I use this on a lot)
 

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I've hauled 20 -25 loads of lumber in mine. I always haul it gate down with a ratchet strap(s). It's never moved. I do have spray in liner which limits the likelihood that the lumber will slide.
 

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Not on this truck (yet) but I've been know to slide really long lumber through sliding rear windows on those occasions where somebody was borrowing my trailer, or I hadn't planned ahead.. Not recommended, and you want to be careful not to stop too quickly, but I bet I'm not the only one.
 

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I have a topper on mine; got the front slider window on the topper for exactly this reason. Maybe once or twice a year I get a few long boards; open both sliders, put a towel across the back of the seat and into the topper and just slide the board in. I usually put my cargo box in the back of the bed and put the back end of the board on that - may throw a cargo strap around the back end of the board(s) to keep them from rocking and bumping the headliner; might throw another towel across the top of the board inside the cab if it is close to the headliner. Ok for a hobby guy like me; not cool if you're doing this for a living.

However, my system also works for fully assembled 10' fly rods!
 

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One of the reasons I wanted to get a truck was to haul lumber. I do woodworking as a hobby and it is great to not have to rent a vehicle to bring home a load of wood.

Today I picked up a few boards and was trying to figure out the best way to pack them in the bed. These were about 8ft long, 6-10" wide. I have the 5'7" bed.

I placed them in the bed diagonally, with the far end on the floor of the bed, and the near end resting on top of the tailgate (which was in the normal "up" position.) I held them down with ratchet straps, which was probably overkill.

I wanted to see from other truck owners how they normally haul lumber. Gate up or down? Orientation of boards? Any other tips? Thanks!
Well, that is the one thing I do not like about my truck. The best way to haul lumber is in a regular cab 8 foot long box with a tonneau or topper. It all fits in and can be protected from the weather. Or a minivan that can carry a 4x8 sheet of plywood and up to 10 ft 2x10s slid between the seats because the console is velcroed in. So, with my 6'4" bed it is always a problem, especially in winter when the roads are often so sloppy. Life is full of compromises.
 

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I got a bed extender years ago and it works great for long lumber,sheet rock,roof tin or what ever needs extra support.It fits into the trailer receiver,extends back beyond the lowered tailgate and has a vertically adjustable T upright.Easy to use,affordable(I think $100 bucks 7 years ago)and takes most of the weight off the tail gate plus it's easy to tie to.I highly recommend it to keep you and your Rams safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the responses all. I was thinking about the bed extender (also for motorcycles), so thanks for the recommendation TMorgan.

The toppers must be nice for hauling in a weatherproof way. I don't have a need much of the time, but it's a nice option. I would probably cover the lumber with tarps if needed, as my tonneau cover wouldn't work with lumber sticking out.

Mopar04, that's a nice method for providing an anchor point for the ratchet straps, I'll have to try that.

I too have thought about putting the rear window down to slide a long board in, but it kinda scared me. A fly rod seem like it wouldn't do much damage, but 10ft of 8/4 white oak... where's my suit of armor?

Thanks again, you guys are great.
 
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