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Has anyone seen what the hitch weight limit will be for the new ram 1500 diesel? With a 9200 pound towing capacity I would guess around 900 pounds?
 

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It is but it isn't.

I used to tow over 10K with my Cummins. Now only 7K tops. Was going to trade for a Pentestar but tow ratings led me to the diesel I have "on order". Having said that...tongue weight is supposed to me no more than 10% of gross trailer weight "on the ball". Not true for 5th wheel or gooseneck and not applicable here.

The 1500 diesel I am ordering has a 3.55 rear-end ratio. In quad cab 4 X 4 the GROSS trailer weight max is 7,750 lbs. You can only go to that 9200 figure with a 2 wheel drive, 3.92 rears and I don't know which bed configuration.

In general,most trucks used will have a gross trailer rating under 8,000 lbs and tongue weights max at 800 lbs. it's really not much more than the Pentastar but it should run way better. It is NOT a 2500 Cummins and I may find a need to "beef" up the rear springs because of that tongue weight. issue.
 

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Go look at the Hemi. Whatever that is good for, this truck should be good for. I can't see them using different hitches for different motors. Just remember, the limited payload of a 1500.
 

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It is but it isn't.

I used to tow over 10K with my Cummins. Now only 7K tops. Was going to trade for a Pentestar but tow ratings led me to the diesel I have "on order". Having said that...tongue weight is supposed to me no more than 10% of gross trailer weight "on the ball". Not true for 5th wheel or gooseneck and not applicable here.

The 1500 diesel I am ordering has a 3.55 rear-end ratio. In quad cab 4 X 4 the GROSS trailer weight max is 7,750 lbs. You can only go to that 9200 figure with a 2 wheel drive, 3.92 rears and I don't know which bed configuration.

In general,most trucks used will have a gross trailer rating under 8,000 lbs and tongue weights max at 800 lbs. it's really not much more than the Pentastar but it should run way better. It is NOT a 2500 Cummins and I may find a need to "beef" up the rear springs because of that tongue weight. issue.
Newb here. I know it's bad form to make my very first post contrary, but the <10% of trailer weight on the tongue seems a little light. I'm thinking it's supposed to be 10-15%.
 

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I'm pretty sure it's the coils/shocks in the rear end that lower the tongue weight as well as the payload. Smooth rides usually come with softer suspensions and in the case of the Ram the suspension might be a little TOO soft which is leading to the lower tongue/payload weights. Harder springs should do the trick to bring that up and maybe improve a little of the trailer stability.

My theory on the lower weights than Hemi are based on the weight increase of the powertrain VS the Hemi. It's not far apart in numbers.

I had this detail in mind when I chose the Outdoorsman, as I'll be using a truck Cap so there's a couple hundred extra pounds at all times and it has the "heavy duty shock absorbers". There's tons of suspension upgrades for Rams, and a set of real good offroad 1-2" lift springs should be the ticket. They'll compensate for your heavy trailer sag, and you should be able to use the full spec of the truck. I wouldnt exceed that necessarily still but that's me. You can even get stiffer shocks too that should help but I think it's really the coils that are the root of the issue
 

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I'll probably be installing bags in the rear with digital controller in the cab and inboard compressor
 

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I'll probably be installing bags in the rear with digital controller in the cab and inboard compressor
Do you have some www links to these bags. What are the pros and cons going with a aftermarket system?
 

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Do you have some www links to these bags. What are the pros and cons going with a aftermarket system?
Andy's Autosport has a couple different packages. The "bag" package and the leveling/height controller system are 2 different companies but fully compatible with each other. Great combo, and tons of available parts(they use non-proprietary standard air fittings). My good friend went to them for his Ford, and just goes to a shop for parts. It's a universal system and it's not for everybody(some assembly required). That's all I have any experience with he just did a mix and match, been great for a few years except he replaced a line.

Andy's Autosport Air Suspensions
 

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Ecodiesel. Would not the Ram air syste help with this hitch wieght issue?
I haven't seen it mentioned anywhere in the literature so I myself cannot answer that question. They just talk about height adjustment and leveling, not an increase in weight tolerances.

Theoretically, unless it was only built with enough structural strength to handle the same amounts as the springs it should handle more because in almost every other application of air bags the payload is increased. In many cases, airbags SIGNIFICANTLY increase the figures but I haven't seen anywhere that Ram says theirs does.
 

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I have used these for several years in my 09 ram. I would get a lot of sag when pulling my travel trailer. These made a world of difference and never had a single problem. They were easy to install and easy to use. I would hookup the trailer and add air to adjust the ride level. The kit I used was from firestone but basically the same as in this video.
 

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Either firestone or airlift. Since these are coil spring rears the only thing avail is the bag that goes inside the coils and can be had for as little as $100. Although this doesn't include a compressor or anythig. And you need to add air manually. On board systems for the rear are 3-$600 depending on heavy duty compressor and Independant control of left/right bags. There's also a full setup for the whole truck for ~$1,600 I think it's airlift.

I'll find links later. But Firestone and airlift are the two I'm looking at.
 

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Question. Why doesn't the constant friction against the sides of those air bags by the coil springs wear holes in the bags?

I had some that were part of the shocks but INSIDE the coils to rub and get smacked with dirt, sticks, rocks etc. seems a likely place for failure.
 

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Remember, air bags will not increase payload capacity, gvw, or gawr. They will only help level.
 

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Remember, air bags will not increase payload capacity, gvw, or gawr. They will only help level.
I disagree entirely. The spring tension in the coil spring suspension provides 100% of the structural support to the back end. Air bags would absolutely increase the payload because they're reducing the stress on the actual springs themselves. It's not like typical shocks(which mostly only provide rebound control) air bags are actually physically holding weight. In a Dodge I can't begin to believe that improving the physical structure of support fails to increase payload. GVW and GCWR wouldn't change because the powertrain hasn't changed, but the vehicle's structural ability to support weight in the back end would increase how could it not!?
 

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I disagree entirely. The spring tension in the coil spring suspension provides 100% of the structural support to the back end. Air bags would absolutely increase the payload because they're reducing the stress on the actual springs themselves. It's not like typical shocks(which mostly only provide rebound control) air bags are actually physically holding weight. In a Dodge I can't begin to believe that improving the physical structure of support fails to increase payload. GVW and GCWR wouldn't change because the powertrain hasn't changed, but the vehicle's structural ability to support weight in the back end would increase how could it not!?
Actually I looked into it and although the physical integrity is increased, you can't legally increase the payload beyond manufacturer's specs by any means. So whether or not your truck handles it is irrelevant you can't get caught doing it
 

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The main reason I purchased the air system was to help with towing performance. My travel trailer tow weight is only 7200lbs fully loaded. I hope that I won't miss my 3500 5.9 cummins towing experince that I enjoy so much.
 

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Actually I looked into it and although the physical integrity is increased, you can't legally increase the payload beyond manufacturer's specs by any means. So whether or not your truck handles it is irrelevant you can't get caught doing it
+1. Every once and a while a story pops up where some guy was pulling too much load and something went bad. Not necessarily went bad because was pulling (or carrying) too much load mind you. I mean something went bad and, oh by the way, his truck was overloaded. The story inevitably goes on to civil suits and sometime criminal courts....it can get really bad if the other side gets all lawyered up. So a person may think that a mod lets them tow or carry more, but if something goes wrong what will really matter is how well you can defend yourself against a lawyer that is entirely capable of convincing a jury that the Earth rotates around the sun. Being on the right side of the OEM specs will help your defense a lot. It might not be enough, but it will help.

I pull 7k lbs usually one weekend per month for on average 12-14hrs round trip with an F-250 diesel. If I downsize to one of these RAM ecodiesels, I too will prob get conventional springs with air bags in the rear. But as mentioned, it's more about helping the truck handle correctly, than any expectation that I'm increasing the truck's tow capacity. I'm kind of pulling this out of my butt tho. I've no personal experience with using rear airbags to help a light duty truck handle a heavy load, so I'm kind of in "hope" mode. I bet there's lots of good anecdotes to be found in the various towing forums tho.
 

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Load arguments always comes back to what does GVWR mean and what implications does that have? The answer depends on how we look at GVWR and payload capacity. GVWR presumably is what a truck can safely weigh when fully loaded. However, there is no clear formula or procedure for coming up with that number. Automotive engineers are elusive about how they arrive at it. Generally, GVWR has to do with how well the truck accelerates, stops, handles and operates while under a full load. But based on what standards?

If we believe the manufacturer's GVWR then there is nothing we can do to increase payload capacity other than having a certified shop upgrade the truck and issue an approved certificate. Several upgrades including air suspension have great advantages but they do not increase the official and mysterious GVWR.

If instead we go on the experience of many owners and upfitters who have tested trucks in real situations then we can consider the official rating as a guideline. The evidence suggests that it is safe to exceed the GVWR with some relatively minor upgrades, careful load placement, and common sense driving. How we personally treat it depends on our sensibilities and on how local authorities treat noncommercial loads.
 
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