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I live in a town of only about 7500 and a one way trip to almost anywhere in town is rarely more than a mile. It only took a 10 days if town driving following a 300 mile road trip for my exhaust filter indicator to tell me it was 90% full and needed to go back on the highway for regeneration. Is this normal, or is it an indication of a problem that I should discuss with the dealer?
 

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I would say that's about normal. The stock tune is pretty smokey, and the DPF will fill up quickly. Especially with cold starts until up to normal operating temperature. If you buy an aftermarket gauge, like an edge CTS, you can monitor the DPF soot load, and take it for a highway run once it reaches 65+% full.
 

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I live in a town of only about 7500 and a one way trip to almost anywhere in town is rarely more than a mile. It only took a 10 days if town driving following a 300 mile road trip for my exhaust filter indicator to tell me it was 90% full and needed to go back on the highway for regeneration. Is this normal, or is it an indication of a problem that I should discuss with the dealer?
Here's some information that might be useful:

Active = fuel is injected into the exhaust stroke strictly for the purpose of increasing exhaust gas temperatures (EGT's) in order to get to the temperature necessary to burn the soot out of the diesel particulate filter (DPF).

Your truck will regenerate (active) when the DPF soot level reaches 65%. This will likely occur every 100-300 miles. You will only see the notice on the EVIC if the soot level reaches 80-90% due to uncompleted regens.

Active self-regeneration occurs when there is not sufficient heat in the exhaust to convert all the carbon being collected in the DPF. Exhaust temperatures are raised by injecting a small amount of fuel upstream of the Diesel Particulate Filter.
The resulting chemical reaction over the DOC raises exhaust gas temperatures high enough to oxidize the carbon from the filter. This is all done without any operator intervention.

Passive = the engine is working hard enough under its own power that the EGT's are hot enough to keep the regeneration of the DPF in process, there is no extra fuel burned as it is not necessary.

Based on my observations, you will not see EGT’s hot enough for passive regeneration at unloaded highway speeds. The EGT’s are actually quite low when cruising on the highway unless you are towing a heavy load,are carrying a full payload, or driving hard.

From forum member Patty:

The truck's programming will make many repeated attempts to regenerate the DPF, from a high soot mass level of 65% down to <10% when a cycle is complete. If your trip is too short and the engine is then shut off, or the truck is put in park with the engine idling, an active regeneration process stops (at whatever soot level the DPF is at). The next drive cycle when the DPF again reaches 65% soot mass the whole process starts all over again. If you are going on a road trip the complete cycle will happen many times over...up to 65%...regen...down to <10%...over and over again.
 

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Sorry to say, but if your driving like that, you bought the wrong vehicle.

Sent from my Samsung Note 4 using Tapatalk.
 

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I live in a town of only about 7500 and a one way trip to almost anywhere in town is rarely more than a mile. It only took a 10 days if town driving following a 300 mile road trip for my exhaust filter indicator to tell me it was 90% full and needed to go back on the highway for regeneration. Is this normal, or is it an indication of a problem that I should discuss with the dealer?
Your shot trips are not allowing your engine to heat up enough for a regeneration to start. My driving style is just a bit better with my trips averaging 6 miles round trip and one 25 mile round trip per week. That seems to be enough to get a regen going and I have not seen the regen message yet. I personally believe that the emission system is designed to operate under any conditions and it will tell you if it needs to run a bit. It would be nice if the manufacturers would at least mention the drawbacks of this emission system though. You may be a good candidate for the GDE tune. See other discussions regarding this...
 

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I have 36402 miles and have not seen an active regen
Here's some information that might be useful:

Active = fuel is injected into the exhaust stroke strictly for the purpose of increasing exhaust gas temperatures (EGT's) in order to get to the temperature necessary to burn the soot out of the diesel particulate filter (DPF).

Your truck will regenerate (active) when the DPF soot level reaches 65%. This will likely occur every 100-300 miles. You will only see the notice on the EVIC if the soot level reaches 80-90% due to uncompleted regens.

Active self-regeneration occurs when there is not sufficient heat in the exhaust to convert all the carbon being collected in the DPF. Exhaust temperatures are raised by injecting a small amount of fuel upstream of the Diesel Particulate Filter.
The resulting chemical reaction over the DOC raises exhaust gas temperatures high enough to oxidize the carbon from the filter. This is all done without any operator intervention.

Passive = the engine is working hard enough under its own power that the EGT's are hot enough to keep the regeneration of the DPF in process, there is no extra fuel burned as it is not necessary.

Based on my observations, you will not see EGT’s hot enough for passive regeneration at unloaded highway speeds. The EGT’s are actually quite low when cruising on the highway unless you are towing a heavy load,are carrying a full payload, or driving hard.

From forum member Patty:

The truck's programming will make many repeated attempts to regenerate the DPF, from a high soot mass level of 65% down to <10% when a cycle is complete. If your trip is too short and the engine is then shut off, or the truck is put in park with the engine idling, an active regeneration process stops (at whatever soot level the DPF is at). The next drive cycle when the DPF again reaches 65% soot mass the whole process starts all over again. If you are going on a road trip the complete cycle will happen many times over...up to 65%...regen...down to <10%...over and over again.
 

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Sweetwater - Run the snot out of your truck every so often. Diesels like heat and the emission controls near demand it.

You should be fine.
 

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Am I losing my mind or are you guys crazy? I have a 2015 Eco Diesel that has been towed twice because the exhaust filter filled up. I drive in town. Prior to purchasing the truck, the sales staff DID NOT inform me that this was a feature (problem?) with this truck. And you guys/gals are content to say, "Oh well. It is what it is?" I am an attorney in La. and me and the dealership are about to have a come to Jesus meeting over this.
 

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Am I losing my mind or are you guys crazy? I have a 2015 Eco Diesel that has been towed twice because the exhaust filter filled up. I drive in town. Prior to purchasing the truck, the sales staff DID NOT inform me that this was a feature (problem?) with this truck. And you guys/gals are content to say, "Oh well. It is what it is?" I am an attorney in La. and me and the dealership are about to have a come to Jesus meeting over this.
I surmise this is your first diesel truck. Especially with emissions. It sounds like you did not research your purchase well enough to suit your vehicle to your driving habits. Not the dealers responsibility to tell you how to drive it. That is up to you. Have your come to Jesus meeting, but I would suggest you trade it in on another vehicle that suits your driving style. Do not call me crazy, just an informed purchaser.
 

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Am I losing my mind or are you guys crazy? I have a 2015 Eco Diesel that has been towed twice because the exhaust filter filled up. I drive in town. Prior to purchasing the truck, the sales staff DID NOT inform me that this was a feature (problem?) with this truck. And you guys/gals are content to say, "Oh well. It is what it is?" I am an attorney in La. and me and the dealership are about to have a come to Jesus meeting over this.
I second that you did not research prior to purchase. The vehicle, even in stock form and not being monitored will let you know to drive at hiway speeds when your filter is at 80%. But, you're a lawyer with an imaginary friend, so what do we know.

Sent from my Samsung Note 4 using Tapatalk.
 
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