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someone here was crying about their fuel economy... my personal experience, did own a 2016 quad 4x2 with 17 hwy radials, at highway speeds she lived at 27 and 28 mpg, and occasionally I'd do 100 mile fuel econ runs at 60mph and would hit 32 mpg... now, I own a 2020, 2 wheeler, 3.92 rear end, crew, air suspension, 18's for tennis shoes, and at 60 and 65 mph, she gets the average 32mpg as advertised... you wrote a fuel price of $2.79, at this writing, I shell out about $1.90 a gallon.... now, when you attempt to justify owning one of these oil burners, jack the truck 6 inches, stick 35's on your joy ride, and put your foot constantly through the firewall, then attempt to do a cost of ownership analysis and justification exercise, be it gas or diesel, you'll never win... 1.) to justify the cost of buying a oil burning power plant, you need to be driving 20 to 25K a year to justify the premium price of the power plant... 2.) your difference or added value is your 30 to 33% increase in fuel economy over a gas power plant... 3.) LOF will be a tad bit more monetarily, than gas but 10k mile intervals over 100,000 miles, the factory pays for the 1st lof, then the next 9 come out of your pocket, vs gas at 7K intervals equals 13 lofs… so, 2.5gal of T-6 is $56, the numbers between oil and gas lof, close to the same.... so, winner, winner, chicken dinner, I love my Eco... she never makes grocery store runs, she's for highway use only...
 

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2015 Laramie 4x4 CC
3.92
20" xd's with duratracs

Drive ~1100 kms/week (680 miles) through the mountains in northern BC. Cruise set at 94kph (60mph). Slow climbs up steep grades, coast down descents

April - December 2019
Avg: 10.9L/100kms (21.6mpg)
Best: 9.5L/100kms (24.8mpg)
**tow 6400lb TT 1-2 month May-Sept

DEF sensor failed, HD Diesel tune and delete installed

January - March 2020
Avg: 10.6L/100kms (22.2mph)
Best: 9.4 L/100kms (25mph)
**winter fuel, high idle warm ups, and 2-3 weeks of -40°

Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk
 

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What highways in the US have traffic that "flows" at 80 -90?
I-75 heading north into Atlanta. Three lanes. Outside lane is trucks and entering/exiting vehicles. Inside lane is for those thinking they're on the Autobahn. Middle lane is the suicide lane. It the mix of those wanting to go faster than the inside lane and those wanting to speed up from the outside lane.
 

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I10 in west Texas. Was on a motorcycle road trip with my son. We were beating feet to get to our planned overnight stop. Windy as hell. Following an 18 wheeler on our BMW R1200RTs at around 85 (in the RIGHT lane). Finally got tired of the dirty air and passed him. As I pulled back into the right lane I noted my speed: 115 mph. As we began to slow down we were passed by a couple of cowboy Cadillacs. And don't get me started about Houston.
 

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hello I am not reading the whole body but your post is just telling the true of mpg so I can say this:
I bough the 2014 eco and the first trip was from N. Carolina to Texas about 1200 miles I got 32.5 mpg stock (in 2014) and I got 34.5 mpg last summer with the Florida trip from Texas (when I got GDE hot tune) all those two trips were hand calculated. Other than that my mpg were terrible I can figure out around 21 mpg with my every day short trips driving. So all in all this truck is very efficient if you use it for long distance commute (or towing that I sometime do because I like it strong). If you do a short commute and not towing it is not worth to own it over the gasser unless you are a diesel enthusiast.
 

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What highways in the US have traffic that "flows" at 80 -90?
Any interstate in Florida...I-4, 75, 95 and even the turnpike in stretches. In moderate flow running 80-85 the Troopers will just watch.

State law gives us 5 over and a Major is 15 over meaning most troopers are waiting for the 85+ drivers...very plentiful. Years ago I was pulled out of a pack on rural I-10 doing 90. He wrote '74' on the ticket so it wasn't a major. We have a 3 mile long 'Buckman Bridge' here in JAX (I-295) where 90-100 is common.

Even rural US-301 is posted 65 and most run 75-80.

Small towns and constructions zones are heavily patrolled and rightfully so.
 

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Any interstate in Florida...I-4, 75, 95 and even the turnpike in stretches. In moderate flow running 80-85 the Troopers will just watch.

State law gives us 5 over and a Major is 15 over meaning most troopers are waiting for the 85+ drivers...very plentiful. Years ago I was pulled out of a pack on rural I-10 doing 90. He wrote '74' on the ticket so it wasn't a major. We have a 3 mile long 'Buckman Bridge' here in JAX (I-295) where 90-100 is common.

Even rural US-301 is posted 65 and most run 75-80.

Small towns and constructions zones are heavily patrolled and rightfully so.
That 301 is heavy with speed traps. Especially going through and around Stark.

When the traffic flow is 80-90, they better be in the left lane or they will just bunch up behind me going 65 in the right. Yep, they honk their horns, flash their lights, and flip their fingers. I just laugh when I catch up to them at the next little town traffic light.

The guy that is continually weaving back and forth across lanes is the humorous one to watch. He manages to be the first one at the light and I usually coast right up to the pack to see him peel out and start weaving to the next little berg and traffic light.

On the Interstate highways I often pass the speeders at the next exit filling up their depleated tanks. With the ED traveling at 65 mph it is very possible to to achieve ranges of 700-760 miles without filling up. Now the bladder does make me stop every 3-4 hours, but only have to fill up every 11-12 hours of driving. So usually catch up to and pass the speeders at the fuel stop. Few miles down the road, there they go zooming by again wondering "How did that olive green Ram get ahead of me again?".
 

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Discussion Starter #109
I envy you folks who have all the time in the world. In a stop and go situation, I agree, speeding is futile. You may save 1-2 minutes across our entire metro area doing that. But on the highway, doing 55mph when the flow is 80mph, I would lose almost an hour per day on most days, some days even more. Negligible savings on 5mpg versus the loss of an hour. Time I can't get back. I can always make more money.
 

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I envy you folks who have all the time in the world. In a stop and go situation, I agree, speeding is futile. You may save 1-2 minutes across our entire metro area doing that. But on the highway, doing 55mph when the flow is 80mph, I would lose almost an hour per day on most days, some days even more. Negligible savings on 5mpg versus the loss of an hour. Time I can't get back. I can always make more money.
If you do the math, 55 mph vs. 80 mph, and you say you would lose an hour. That would mean that you travel 230 miles a day.

However, my experience has been that my truck actually gets better MPG at 63-65 than it does at 55. Something to do my transmission hunts between 7-8th at 55 mph due to the rolling hills we have here. Plus, the MPG difference between 65 vs 80 is between 8-9 mpg. Driving at 65 vs 80 yields a time savings of almost 14 minutes per hour of driving.
 

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That 301 is heavy with speed traps. Especially going through and around Stark.

When the traffic flow is 80-90, they better be in the left lane or they will just bunch up behind me going 65 in the right. Yep, they honk their horns, flash their lights, and flip their fingers. I just laugh when I catch up to them at the next little town traffic light.

The guy that is continually weaving back and forth across lanes is the humorous one to watch. He manages to be the first one at the light and I usually coast right up to the pack to see him peel out and start weaving to the next little berg and traffic light.

On the Interstate highways I often pass the speeders at the next exit filling up their depleated tanks. With the ED traveling at 65 mph it is very possible to to achieve ranges of 700-760 miles without filling up. Now the bladder does make me stop every 3-4 hours, but only have to fill up every 11-12 hours of driving. So usually catch up to and pass the speeders at the fuel stop. Few miles down the road, there they go zooming by again wondering "How did that olive green Ram get ahead of me again?".
301 now has a bypass around Starke. Also Waldo was the AAA speed trap that the state finally shut down. For me it depends on how far I am from home when business is completed and how traffic flows.

My point being here in crazy Florida posted limits mean zero if heavy flow is popping...and on the interstates it seemingly always is.
 

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Discussion Starter #112
If you do the math, 55 mph vs. 80 mph, and you say you would lose an hour. That would mean that you travel 230 miles a day.

However, my experience has been that my truck actually gets better MPG at 63-65 than it does at 55. Something to do my transmission hunts between 7-8th at 55 mph due to the rolling hills we have here. Plus, the MPG difference between 65 vs 80 is between 8-9 mpg. Driving at 65 vs 80 yields a time savings of almost 14 minutes per hour of driving.
Not sure where you're getting your math from. I was going off an average of 150 highway miles I drive on a typical day. Here is the math for you on each.

Distance/Speed=Time
150 @ 80 = 1hr 52 minutes
150 @ 65 = 2hr 18 minutes Difference of 26 minutes @ 65
150 @ 55 = 2hr 43 minutes Difference of 51 minutes @55

Using your assumed 230 mile number
Distance/Speed=Time
230 @ 80 = 2hr 52 minutes
230 @ 65 = 3hr 32 minutes Difference of 40 minutes @ 65
230 @ 55 = 4hr 10 minutes Difference of 1hr 18 minutes @ 55

As for difference in MPG, I have never seen a 8-9mpg swing outside of towing my car hauler with a car on it compared to the absolute best MPG I've registered in the 60k+ I've been logging my truck. My day to day average is 22mpg and that includes 75/25 highway/city and probably 2 hours or more idling. The best I've EVER got was 28mpg and that was right at 50-55mph over a long flat stretch in west TX. My typical highway only mpg, regardless of terrain or average speed has been about 24mpg.
 

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On my 2015 Laramie 4x4 - my wife averaged anywhere from 19-21 mpg. Her typical routine - remote start, let get warm, load kid, drive 1.5 miles to drive thru - go through drive thru, drive home....

We put about 30K/year on it - I-95 to Ft Lauderdale from Rocky Mount NC area, a week in town, and the trip back, running with the flow of traffic (65-80 mph), it averaged a measured 28.7 - EVIC was 28.1.

Eastern NC to Asheville area, with an open trailer, in tow/haul, car loaded on return trip, again, running with traffic (70-85 mph), it averaged 22.6.

Back and forth to work for me (21 miles at the time, 45-60 mph), it would average about 27.1 mpg.

Trip to her parents house (95 miles, 45-60 mph), it would get 33+ mpg.

Was distinctly noticeable that the transmission took about 18-20 minutes to get near operating temperature, and that until it did, mileage suffered comparatively. For example, headed to work, the first half or 2/3 of the trip, it would get 23-24 mpg, then closer to 33once everything finally reached operating temps.

Early on, I questioned how high the EVIC was reading, so I always checked real numbers to compare. My EVIC was ALWAYS low. Sometimes as much as 2 mpg.

I used to believe that some people just can’t drive, and that’s why their mileage is so terrible - but after watching mine, I realize that if they have a 15 mile drive, at highway speeds, and that is how they are using it, the mpg would pretty much always suck. But then, that same person would probably be averaging 13-14 in a Hemi, or in an F150 gas truck.
 

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Not sure where you're getting your math from. I was going off an average of 150 highway miles I drive on a typical day. Here is the math for you on each.

Distance/Speed=Time
150 @ 80 = 1hr 52 minutes
150 @ 65 = 2hr 18 minutes Difference of 26 minutes @ 65
150 @ 55 = 2hr 43 minutes Difference of 51 minutes @55

Using your assumed 230 mile number
Distance/Speed=Time
230 @ 80 = 2hr 52 minutes
230 @ 65 = 3hr 32 minutes Difference of 40 minutes @ 65
230 @ 55 = 4hr 10 minutes Difference of 1hr 18 minutes @ 55

As for difference in MPG, I have never seen a 8-9mpg swing outside of towing my car hauler with a car on it compared to the absolute best MPG I've registered in the 60k+ I've been logging my truck. My day to day average is 22mpg and that includes 75/25 highway/city and probably 2 hours or more idling. The best I've EVER got was 28mpg and that was right at 50-55mph over a long flat stretch in west TX. My typical highway only mpg, regardless of terrain or average speed has been about 24mpg.
Some things that will affect your mileage:

- Tires - the Bridgestones on the 2020 I am picking up are rated 4/5 on economy. LRRs could see as much as a 25% improvement over non LRR designs. The factory Goodyear SR-A on my 15 was clearly a highway tire, but Goodyear doesn’t give a fuel economy comparative on the site. Compared to an A/T, I would say the gains would be significant.

- Tire Pressures - I cannot tell you how many times we have someone put LT tires (E Range) on a 1500, and complain about ride, economy, wear, etc. You pump the tires up to 50-55 psi, and they think you performed a miracle! The factory number is usually about 10% lower than it needs to be, even on a P radial - pay attention to your wear - if the edges are wearing more quickly, your pressures are too low, which hurts economy!

- Alignment - Having the correct toe settings is important to reduce scrub, and improve economy.

- Brakes - All the time, hear people complain about warped rotors - they don’t warp, they wear - runout basically thins the inside and outside 180 degrees apart, creating a thickness variation in the rotor you feel as a pulsation. The allowed runout is .002 inches. Calipers typically retract .001 inches - so until it drags enough times to force the caliper out, anything beyond that is effectively like dragging the brakes while driving. A proper On-Car lathe brake job, even when installing new rotors, is the only way to solve this! It’s also VERY important to ensure the hardware was changed, contact points are lubricated, and the slide pins are completely free and functional. I have seen Grand Caravans, and some Grand Cherokees losing 3 mpg from brake runout! And wheel bearing issues will contribute to

Beyond that, if the cetane of your local fuel is particularly poor, you may see some benefits to using Diesel Kleen or similar.

The only other significant factor is always the loose nut behind the wheel! I have an exceptionally smooth driving style, often using the cruise control, and planning ahead to minimize braking, keeping hard acceleration to a minimum, etc. I typically will run with traffic, so I’m not particularly conservative on fuel, but I get better than most people in most vehicles. I attribute that to smoothness. According to the EPA, that’s the single largest factor!
Hopefully that will help!
 

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Now some of you can appreciate why I blow so many trailer tires on Interstate 75 in Florida. I would only ride in the middle lane if afraid to "fall off the edge". The right lane is rough and littered with breakdowns and pieces of old tires. The left lane is for Autobahn usage and only defiant trucks of the left lane ban. 80 mph is the general common speed north to sough on I 75 in Florida. Only in Georgia is there a respite through small towns using that part of I 75 to help pay the towns' budget.

It is not hard to get good fuel mileage at 80 mph. It is impossible.
 

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Not sure where you're getting your math from. I was going off an average of 150 highway miles I drive on a typical day. Here is the math for you on each.

Distance/Speed=Time
150 @ 80 = 1hr 52 minutes
150 @ 65 = 2hr 18 minutes Difference of 26 minutes @ 65
150 @ 55 = 2hr 43 minutes Difference of 51 minutes @55

Using your assumed 230 mile number
Distance/Speed=Time
230 @ 80 = 2hr 52 minutes
230 @ 65 = 3hr 32 minutes Difference of 40 minutes @ 65
230 @ 55 = 4hr 10 minutes Difference of 1hr 18 minutes @ 55

As for difference in MPG, I have never seen a 8-9mpg swing outside of towing my car hauler with a car on it compared to the absolute best MPG I've registered in the 60k+ I've been logging my truck. My day to day average is 22mpg and that includes 75/25 highway/city and probably 2 hours or more idling. The best I've EVER got was 28mpg and that was right at 50-55mph over a long flat stretch in west TX. My typical highway only mpg, regardless of terrain or average speed has been about 24mpg.
I don't know where I got that 230 mile number from either .... I stand corrected.

The 8-9 MPG swing, I've checked more than once. During the warmer months, I get 32+ mpg on the road at 65 and it drops off to 24 at 78-79 mph. Here 80 mph is the danger speed for setting off the police radar.

Been keeping up with the MPG since day one of owning the truck. I sold my Lincoln MKZ Hybrid and traded off my Dakota that I was using to tow my race motorcycles because wife would fuss at me for taking up parking spaces with 2 vehicles. I think she was really hoping that I would just stop racing...
 

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Alabama now has a law that the left lane is only for passing and if you stay in the left lane more than 2 mile you can get a ticket. Most of the time I drive in the right lane at 69 mph maybe a little over 70mph for short. But even in Birmingham where they have 4 and 5 on each side of the interstate we try to stay in the middle lane because people getting off. My best mileage is between 60 and 70 mph

As far trailer tires we run only tire that are ST rated for trailer only and most of them are only rated at max 81 to 82 mph. We just put a set a goose net trailer ST 14 ply and the were only rated for max 81mph.
 

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Thursday last week I went fishing with the wife and son for my birthday. 240 miles on the tank. 40 miles driving back and forth to work and 200 miles towing our 4500-5000 lb boat. I drove 65 empty to work and back 1 day the 40 miles. When I hooked up the boat the EVIC said 30.1 mpg. When I unhooked the boat in the garage after we got back from the trip I had 240 miles and the EVIC said 20.7 MPG.

If you calculate that out 40 miles at 30.1 mpg, then the towing mileage comes out to 18.82 mpg. That is on the high side of my towing numbers, but the more I drive the truck the progressively better the mileage has gotten and I had no head wind on the way down and a mild-ish tail wind on the way home.

I drove cruise control set on 65 on a 75 mph road (I-37) had no issues with traffic running me over or causing jams, and yes the left lane does move at 80-90 mph. I passed a few people in the right lane, but just waiting for a gap makes it now biggie.
In the spirit of telling the TRUTH... My above calculations on this were all based off of the EVIC calculated mileage..... which as I have said many times and will continue to, IS NOT ACCURATE! I filled up and the EVIC said 26.2 mpg. Hand calculated said 22.8 over the whole tank with 460 miles on it.
 
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