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If your running stock tuning you can hold that pig to the floor it well derate to protect itself. Derate temps are 245 F coolant, 270 F oil. Transmission well not get hot enough to care unless there is a mechanical defect even then it holds up to 270 F somehow.
 

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Just found this thread before posting a new one. So, I don’t need to be alarmed when I am going up a mountain pass, have the winter front on and as I accelerate up hill, even with the air temp being between 8-12 F outside, my engine runs at 224?
 

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Just found this thread before posting a new one. So, I don’t need to be alarmed when I am going up a mountain pass, have the winter front on and as I accelerate up hill, even with the air temp being between 8-12 F outside, my engine runs at 224?
Yes, correct. 224 is completely reasonable. My dads 3.6 pentastar Ram 1500 will hover around 215-230 just cruising on the flat highway. It has 2 thermostats, one opens at 215, and the other at 230. I believe our trucks are similar. If you get it hot enough to turn the radiator fans on and be able to hear them, the fans don't kick on until at least 225-230 on our trucks. Newer trucks run hotter for emissions compliance.

I don't like seeing my temps go above 240, which is why I'm doing a custom oil cooler (like several others on here have done).
 

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Just found this thread before posting a new one. So, I don’t need to be alarmed when I am going up a mountain pass, have the winter front on and as I accelerate up hill, even with the air temp being between 8-12 F outside, my engine runs at 224?
I agree with the theoretical maximums stated above. However, keeping the temperatures as close to "normal" operating range as possible during loaded and towing situations is desirable. Be cautious with custom oil coolers. Just tossing in any old one could cause problems with oil fluid/pressures.
 

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Warm oil flow betters and works better at protection along with better MPG. What is warm? IMO warm oil is 215-230. Hot is above 235. Unacceptable is above 250 for turbo engines. The new generation EcoD owners are reporting stock oil temps without covers are 220.

Review forums for air cooled Porsches, Harley, and BMW (oil cooled). Those guys run hot oil on a normal basis and track racing temps are crazy high. 250-280 temps is what they see. Older Porsche oil temp gauges go to 300.
 

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Warm oil flow betters and works better at protection along with better MPG. What is warm? IMO warm oil is 215-230. Hot is above 235. Unacceptable is above 250 for turbo engines. The new generation EcoD owners are reporting stock oil temps without covers are 220.

Review forums for air cooled Porsches, Harley, and BMW (oil cooled). Those guys run hot oil on a normal basis and track racing temps are crazy high. 250-280 temps is what they see. Older Porsche oil temp gauges go to 300.
They also have much lower in cylinder temps than a diesel and have air cooling, aka not a direct comparison. Harleys can see oil temps near 500 F under poor conditions and there oil cooled as well. Oil temps between 220-240 are fine for most modern diesels but still not ideal for long term reliability. Oil cools the bottom end and coolant cools the top end also oil thins out as it heats up so its film strength gets worse even though it flows better.
 

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Just found this thread before posting a new one. So, I don’t need to be alarmed when I am going up a mountain pass, have the winter front on and as I accelerate up hill, even with the air temp being between 8-12 F outside, my engine runs at 224?
If you tow in cold weather, once it's up to normal temp, remove the winter front. If you are the slightest bit nervous of the oil temps, send a sample of your used oil to a lab.From my experience, Rotella T6 at 10,000 miles, looks excellent.
 

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Just found this thread before posting a new one. So, I don’t need to be alarmed when I am going up a mountain pass, have the winter front on and as I accelerate up hill, even with the air temp being between 8-12 F outside, my engine runs at 224?
I can believe that.

The other day on our way home from the airport, about 50 miles, it was 15 F outside. I have the front cover on and all holes closed.

And I must of been in a hurry to get home, I had drifted up to 80 mph, and my engine temp was 215 F, which surprised me with the outside 15 F.

I postulated that pushing air creates enough work to warm things up. Once I slowed down to 65, so did the engine temp.

It was a curious observation.

I cannot wait to take the damned thing off!
 

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I'm used to airplane engines, not ecodiesels, so these concerns for the temps you guys are seeing don't sit well with me. I personally am only concerned if my oil temp is too low (and to me, below 200 is WAAAAY to low). Higher temps get rid of moisture in the oil.
 

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I'm used to airplane engines, not ecodiesels, so these concerns for the temps you guys are seeing don't sit well with me. I personally am only concerned if my oil temp is too low (and to me, below 200 is WAAAAY to low). Higher temps get rid of moisture in the oil.
I run a very large external oil cooler, and by nature my oil temps stay nice and cool. I've never had moisture in my oil and it's tested every oil change.
 
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