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I just hope that FCA does not use us as beta testers as they have on their past vehicles, the Dart and the 200 are perfect examples, and I am wondering if this was the case with the ecodiesel...??
The EcoDiesel is a beta test, one that has been a success overall, most people have zero issues, stock or not, the only really big failure would be the emissions “scandal”.


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Been enjoying my new 2018 Laramie ED quite a bit in the 10 months since purchasing. It's comfortable, looks great, get's amazing mileage and towed a 7300-7400lb toyhauler to the race track with ease. Took her for a 150+ mile drive on the highway this weekend with the Mrs and about a mile from home, it started clattering and making an awful racket just as I was about to cross a busy intersection. I backed out of the intersection while I had a chance and the clattering seemed to ease up in reverse. Wife is 9mo. pregnant and was scared as hell. The engine smoothed out a bit, so I limped us home asap. I've heard rod knock before, so caught the sound on video and bounced it off my motorcycle mechanic, who advised don't drive it and it's on it's way out.

I had it towed to the dealer where I bought it, who also did the first oil change about a month ago. They confirmed it threw a rod at 8500mi, new engine will be here within a week, and installed the following week.

The wife and I are questioning whether we can trust this little motor for the long haul, replacement and all, and considering trading it for a 2019 Laramie w/ 5.7 Hemi. We would lose a chunk of value on the current truck, which would be rolled into our new auto-loan and the MPG hit between the ED and Hemi is negligible. I personally feel that a diesel just feels proper in a truck with it's driving characteristics, but a $65K+ Cummins is a bit beyond our budget.

As a side note, my dad has been doing business with our current dealer for 30-40yrs and currently has a 5.7 Hemi in his '05 2500 that runs like an absolute top with 140K miles on her. He's tootin' his horn about how I bought the wrong motor :D .. Ultimately seeking a motor that's going to last me the next 15-20yrs.
I had an 04 Hemi Laramie that I bought new never had any issues with it to speak of in over 100k miles. I traded in the 04 back in 2014 for 15 Laramie ED. The ED that had an engine failure at just over 60k at the time there were a bunch of engines on back order and Ram couldn't tell me how long it would be before I got the truck back. I found a good dealer that gave me full trade value on the ED and I traded for an 18 2500 Bighorn with Harvest package with the Cummis. Been super happy with it so far, it does ride rougher and the mileage isn't as good but I have confidence in the truck and that is worth a lot to me so I have no regrets moving to the Cummins. That being said I had a bit of equity in the 15 and didn't have to roll over anything into the new truck loan. As far as the Hemi goes the one I had in my 04 was a solid reliable engine but fuel economy sucked especially when towing.
 

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Got a 2018 Loaded Eco, LOVED it until @ 17,400 miles had a total engine failure. One of the main caps and assorted parts were lying in the base. 2 months at dealership, new engine just arrived. Been driving assorted rental and loaners,not too happy :(
 

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Got a 2018 Loaded Eco, LOVED it until @ 17,400 miles had a total engine failure. One of the main caps and assorted parts were lying in the base. 2 months at dealership, new engine just arrived. Been driving assorted rental and loaners,not too happy :(
Did it take 2 months because the engine was on back order or something? I've seen some people with a turn around of 2 weeks on a new engine..
 

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Reality time for some. I believe the ED is a good engine but like most diesels and some gas they need to be cared for differently. Example. Grew up on a ranch and equipment is expensive. Sitting in a 200k diesel tractor you warm her up and ease into the throttle and load. Clean oil, air and fuel are paramount! Watch these things it will serve you well for decades. Diesel truck engines are no different. Warm it up and drive it letting the torque do the work. Diesels are not designed to get the shit revved out of them! Keep the RPMS BELOW 4K! I have 36k 3850 is as high as my truck has ever revved. (Banks idash monitor) The biggest enemy still if you do everything right is the Egr and soot! I use the best oil available and change it around 7500-8k. I also get oil analysis done to monitor wear metals and the oil. I am also trying to get the thumbs up from fca/dealer to use a oil bypass filter system! Mopar sells one for the Cummins so I’m trying to get an ok for the Ed. If you could get rid of that DAMN EGR it would be huge for the engine longevity! We are in a catch 22! Do everything right and eliminate the egr and/or use bypass filtration and loose your engine warranty based on zero logic and giving fca an excuse! Or leave it stock and at the very best it lasts to 100k but you let the soot and egr muck sand down the internals and damage your engine so it won’t last! Cummins duramax cat etc all face these issues! Big advantage to the bigger displacements is 3500rpm or lower is there redline! In closing, warm her up, don’t redline it, keep up on the maintenance and it will last.
 

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I had a 1963 Dodge Dart. Great car. The slant-six: 170 cu in engine was bulletproof and the push button auto trans was futuristic at the time.
The push button transmission in Chrysler Corp cars first was used in 1956 and stopped in 1964 due to some government regulation that all cars needed similar shifting devices and patterns. I guess that law has now changed, at least as far as shifting device and location.
 

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Reality time for some. I believe the ED is a good engine but like most diesels and some gas they need to be cared for differently. Example. Grew up on a ranch and equipment is expensive. Sitting in a 200k diesel tractor you warm her up and ease into the throttle and load. Clean oil, air and fuel are paramount! Watch these things it will serve you well for decades. Diesel truck engines are no different. Warm it up and drive it letting the torque do the work. Diesels are not designed to get the shit revved out of them! Keep the RPMS BELOW 4K! I have 36k 3850 is as high as my truck has ever revved. (Banks idash monitor) The biggest enemy still if you do everything right is the Egr and soot! I use the best oil available and change it around 7500-8k. I also get oil analysis done to monitor wear metals and the oil. I am also trying to get the thumbs up from fca/dealer to use a oil bypass filter system! Mopar sells one for the Cummins so I’m trying to get an ok for the Ed. If you could get rid of that DAMN EGR it would be huge for the engine longevity! We are in a catch 22! Do everything right and eliminate the egr and/or use bypass filtration and loose your engine warranty based on zero logic and giving fca an excuse! Or leave it stock and at the very best it lasts to 100k but you let the soot and egr muck sand down the internals and damage your engine so it won’t last! Cummins duramax cat etc all face these issues! Big advantage to the bigger displacements is 3500rpm or lower is there redline! In closing, warm her up, don’t redline it, keep up on the maintenance and it will last.
There's a lot of GOOD in this post. I just brought it up again so more people might read it and learn.
 

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Trade if for a 5.7L Hemi or a Cummins/Duramax/Powerstroke (big ones, not the 3.0L versions).

My next diesel will be a big one. If I had the shop/time I'd re-power a 3/4 ton with a Cat 3126.
 

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Reality time for some. I believe the ED is a good engine but like most diesels and some gas they need to be cared for differently. Example. Grew up on a ranch and equipment is expensive. Sitting in a 200k diesel tractor you warm her up and ease into the throttle and load. Clean oil, air and fuel are paramount! Watch these things it will serve you well for decades. Diesel truck engines are no different. Warm it up and drive it letting the torque do the work. Diesels are not designed to get the shit revved out of them! Keep the RPMS BELOW 4K! I have 36k 3850 is as high as my truck has ever revved. (Banks idash monitor) The biggest enemy still if you do everything right is the Egr and soot! I use the best oil available and change it around 7500-8k. I also get oil analysis done to monitor wear metals and the oil. I am also trying to get the thumbs up from fca/dealer to use a oil bypass filter system! Mopar sells one for the Cummins so I’m trying to get an ok for the Ed. If you could get rid of that DAMN EGR it would be huge for the engine longevity! We are in a catch 22! Do everything right and eliminate the egr and/or use bypass filtration and loose your engine warranty based on zero logic and giving fca an excuse! Or leave it stock and at the very best it lasts to 100k but you let the soot and egr muck sand down the internals and damage your engine so it won’t last! Cummins duramax cat etc all face these issues! Big advantage to the bigger displacements is 3500rpm or lower is there redline! In closing, warm her up, don’t redline it, keep up on the maintenance and it will last.
Not to plug any specific company, but the main reason our ED is tuned - longevity. Disables the EGR and uses almost no DEF.
 

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Not to plug any specific company, but the main reason our ED is tuned - longevity. Disables the EGR and uses almost no DEF.
Yes and we need to be intellectually honest. Sometimes it doesn't matter how you pamper it, it's gonna fail. Whether it's a design, production, or manufacturing issue sometimes you get the bad seed. Users have documented it over and over again.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
I appreciate the advice I've received here. The dealer has had my truck for about four weeks with no ETA on when the engine replacement would be completed. They're one of the largest dealers in CA and only have a single diesel technician, that is apparently always slammed.

This past Saturday the wife and I loaded up our newborn and decided to pay them a visit. Long story short, there were some good labor day rebates on the 2019 Rams and given the circumstances of my ED purchase and engine failure less than a year after purchase, they offered me above top dollar on the trade-in. I loved my ED, but it's apparent that the emissions equipment has a strangle-hold on the engine, coupled with the low-end failure, solo diesel tech, expensive engine replacement (out of warranty) and the 5.7 Hemi lower TCO. I chose a small short-term financial hit in favor a (potential) long-term reward.

I heavily weighed in on the Cummins option, but it's very expensive and I don't tow enough to justify the excess cost.

Here's the new 2019 Ram 1500 BigHorn that's now in my driveway-

IMG_20190831_143710.jpg
 

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Well the worse the Hemi will do is the lifters might act up eventually, needle bearings fail and some eat into cam. And some will do intermittent snapping on start up, like my 2018. Mine has done it since new basically have 46k km on it now, and it's not exhaust manifold bolts because it's only 2 seconds of so. But neither of these will leave you stranded on the side of the highway. Needle bearing issue is usually high mileage and throws a misfire code but still runs. I've heard engines being warrantied as late as the 2016 model year.

Anyways congrats on the new truck. Just keep good oil in it and don't go by the maintenance minder with the conventional 5w20 that comes in the things. 10k miles is wayyyy too long, 6k max IMO and even that is pushing it. IMO all motors have their issues no matter what the brand. The ED is a very fine engine just the emissions systems is the bane of any moderns diesels existence these days. All time without your vehicles and parts availability is a good reason to trade. Good luck.
 

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I appreciate the advice I've received here. The dealer has had my truck for about four weeks with no ETA on when the engine replacement would be completed. They're one of the largest dealers in CA and only have a single diesel technician, that is apparently always slammed.

This past Saturday the wife and I loaded up our newborn and decided to pay them a visit. Long story short, there were some good labor day rebates on the 2019 Rams and given the circumstances of my ED purchase and engine failure less than a year after purchase, they offered me above top dollar on the trade-in. I loved my ED, but it's apparent that the emissions equipment has a strangle-hold on the engine, coupled with the low-end failure, solo diesel tech, expensive engine replacement (out of warranty) and the 5.7 Hemi lower TCO. I chose a small short-term financial hit in favor a (potential) long-term reward.

I heavily weighed in on the Cummins option, but it's very expensive and I don't tow enough to justify the excess cost.

Here's the new 2019 Ram 1500 BigHorn that's now in my driveway-

View attachment 82312
Perform an oil change after 1000 miles (this will remove all the break in material) and run pure synthetic oil of your choice.
I have done this on the last 3 Hemi's I've owned and never had any problems.
The known issues are timing chain wear due to MDS and the aforementioned lifters (though much less prevalent).
The Hemi is easy to modify if you are wanting more speed too :)

edit: consider installing a catch can for the PCV system / crankcase breather. It won't void anything on your warranty and will keep the top end much cleaner.
 

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I appreciate the advice I've received here. The dealer has had my truck for about four weeks with no ETA on when the engine replacement would be completed. They're one of the largest dealers in CA and only have a single diesel technician, that is apparently always slammed.

This past Saturday the wife and I loaded up our newborn and decided to pay them a visit. Long story short, there were some good labor day rebates on the 2019 Rams and given the circumstances of my ED purchase and engine failure less than a year after purchase, they offered me above top dollar on the trade-in. I loved my ED, but it's apparent that the emissions equipment has a strangle-hold on the engine, coupled with the low-end failure, solo diesel tech, expensive engine replacement (out of warranty) and the 5.7 Hemi lower TCO. I chose a small short-term financial hit in favor a (potential) long-term reward.

I heavily weighed in on the Cummins option, but it's very expensive and I don't tow enough to justify the excess cost.

Here's the new 2019 Ram 1500 BigHorn that's now in my driveway-

View attachment 82312
Hemis are great motors, my Dodge magnum ran perfectly with almost 400,000 miles, my last Ram, also with almost 300,000 miles. Still, I wouldn't trade my tuned ED for a hemi. Beautiful Ram!
 

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Well as usual the oil flows quicker in the winter down south. And I'm sure you hear of much less issues with the Hemi in USA vs Canada. I've heard some driving by making some god awful sounds. I'm not sure if the Gen 3 is a 300k mile motor like previous generations. A lot of them end up snapping the most rear bolts on the exhaust manifold here as well. Pretty sure the cam and lifters get awful loud with the miles and wear. I think you can have enough confidence in the motor of the new truck. I'm trying an additive in this one Zmax seems to have quieted things up. Don't laugh too hard, but in my opinion it isn't snake oil. Some new Hemis are quiet and stay quiet, others do the snappy start up from new. Dodge saved 2 cents on the lifters.
 

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Well as usual the oil flows quicker in the winter down south. And I'm sure you hear of much less issues with the Hemi in USA vs Canada. I've heard some driving by making some god awful sounds. I'm not sure if the Gen 3 is a 300k mile motor like previous generations. A lot of them end up snapping the most rear bolts on the exhaust manifold here as well. Pretty sure the cam and lifters get awful loud with the miles and wear. I think you can have enough confidence in the motor of the new truck. I'm trying an additive in this one Zmax seems to have quieted things up. Don't laugh too hard, but in my opinion it isn't snake oil. Some new Hemis are quiet and stay quiet, others do the snappy start up from new. Dodge saved 2 cents on the lifters.
the lifters aren't the problem, it's excessive lash in the valve train. A few owners have installed slightly longer than stock pushrods to quiet the issue, some just live with it (it doesn't effect longevity).
I was able to use the stock length on my build with no issues.
Just don't go with thicker than recommended oil or you'll have issues with the cam phaser...
 
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