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Discussion Starter #1
I have a deployment coming up and since this is my first diesel vehicle was wondering if anyone had any tips specifically for the EcoDiesel on long term storage. I will be gone for about 7 months, and my wife will be able start the truck but she will not be driving it much.

Thanks,
Shane
 

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I'd just put it away with fresh engine oil , keep it on a battery tender and put 60 psi air in the tires to prevent flat spots.
Don't start the truck unless it's going to be driven and brought up to full operating temperatures.

Edit: Also a full tank of fresh fuel and maybe some sort of fuel stabilizer.
 

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Yes, just starting it up to idle is not a good idea. You would likely cause issues with clogging the DPF.

It would be ideal to start it up about every month and gently warm the engine/fluids up and drive it for 40 or so miles with a mix of city and highway driving, but if the wife isn't comfortable doing it, then just let it sit with the precautions that Diesel997 mentions.
 

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Shane, will your truck be kept garaged or outside?
Im going to try and fit it into my garage but im not sure if its possible. most likely it will be outside. Maybe ill buy a nice cover to protect it. I could have the wife drive it on the highway once a month or so. she just isnt comfortable parking it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'd just put it away with fresh engine oil , keep it on a battery tender and put 60 psi air in the tires to prevent flat spots.
Don't start the truck unless it's going to be driven and brought up to full operating temperatures.

Edit: Also a full tank of fresh fuel and maybe some sort of fuel stabilizer.
How long should the tender be on? is it for a day once a month or so, or are we talking leaving it on 24/7.
 

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I wouldn't use a cover.7 months is a long time to have a cover on a vehicle outside.any real weather and the cover will start flogging your paint...highly likely you'll come back to a mess.
then there's possibility of hail in the spring and early summer before you return.cover won't help with big hail much.if you can get it inside,do it.

I do this when I store my mustang...treat fuel well,then drive around a bit to circulate treated fuel.wash and heavy coat of good paste wax.change oil and filter, park it in an enclosed safe storage spot.remove battery.jack up car to limit load on tires (reduces flat spotting) or even remove tires altogether.take battery home and keep in warmish safe place,use jerry can to top off tank till full.close doors and walk away till snow melts.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ya i think im going to do my best to fit the truck in the garage. Its only a one car so its going to be a tight fit, especially with my MAC box in the way. If it does fit the garage would be basically sealed for the next 7 months. ill start rearranging things sooner than later and start trying to get the truck to fit. Thanks for the inputs everyone
 

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I'd just put it away with fresh engine oil , keep it on a battery tender and put 60 psi air in the tires to prevent flat spots.
Don't start the truck unless it's going to be driven and brought up to full operating temperatures.

Edit: Also a full tank of fresh fuel and maybe some sort of fuel stabilizer.

Yep... I agree too. Unlike a gas engine... you will do more harm, unless it's driven. You will build condensation, and put fuel down in the oil.


So... change the oil... and put a load of anti-fungal treatment in the fuel tank. I personally wouldn't fill the tank, since you may have a load of bad (full of algae) fuel when you get home, and it will be more fuel to have to burn out later. Unlike gas... it doesn't go bad, or attract water.

I'm on the fence with a tender. I've seen too many batteries boiled out while sitting on the tender. What I would do, is to put a "Pig tail" on the battery... then ask your wife to plug it in for a day or so, every couple weeks. It's the safest option.
 

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Are AGM batteries recommended for use with a tender?
 

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Are AGM batteries recommended for use with a tender?
The newer tenders say they are OK... but like I said... I don't leave them hooked up all the time anymore. (even with the real brands) FYI... I use a "Battery Tender Jr" on my motorcycles... and a bigger tender for my SxS, and other toys.
 

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On the full tank thing...reason being is that a partially full tank has an air space that expands and contracts with changes in temperature. This draws and expells air because the tank is ventilated.air contains moisture.a cold snap draws in air, and the moisture condenses in the cold.over time this builds water in the bottom of the tank.this behavior is far worse in a part of the continent that has wide variations in temperature. I used to live on the east coast, and I've seen tanks with over a gallon of water after one winter.

Either go full to the cap or dead empty imop...I fill it up.treat your diesel with a good antifungal treatment and make sure it's circulated through the system.treated diesel will keep for years if it's fairly well sealed.it will be fine in your tank for your deployment easily.
 

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I do what runcible says with my toys. I take the battery out of my boat, my bike and my 4 wheeler and put them in my laundry room off the ground on wood blocks. The battery will not lose any charge while it's sitting there so no need to mess with a battery tender. If the winter's aren't too terribly cold where you live just disconnect the negative battery cable and it will be fine. I also like to get things up on jackstands so I don't have to worry about flat spotting tires, as well as treating the fuel. I personally like to leave as little fuel in as possible - treated of course - in case something does go wrong with it. Have never had a problem in 34 years doing this.
 

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Good afternoon, everyone.

I was wondering if the same tips apply for longer term storage. I just received short-fuzed 3 year orders to go to Guam at the end of June. I was initially thinking of taking my ED with me, but have since found out that there really aren't any roads to get to "highway speeds" for any amount of time, which means that my diesel exhaust filter will fill up and no real way to get it cleaned out (that I know of anyway). So, now my options are to store it for 3 years or to sell it after a year's worth of payments.

I'm still looking at storage options. one is at my grandmother's house. There, it will be stored in her old chicken house, so fairly protected from the elements, but dusty as all get out(this is where my boat is going). My dad can go down about once a month to drive it around, but he's fairly uncomfortable with it, since he's very unfamiliar with diesels. The second option (possibly) is to store it at the same facility the military will store vehicles for members. I will have to pay out of pocket since we are taking my wife's GTi with us (military will only store or ship a single car on a set of orders). Because I'll be paying out of pocket, I'm not sure the facility will store it or not. I plan on calling them tomorrow morning to find find out.

So, my question is, is storing for 3 years basically the same as storing for 6-7 months? Wash/Wax, anti-fungal treatment, new oil/filter, disconnect battery (I expect to change it when I get back). This is basically what I got from this thread. Is there anything else you can think of that I'll need to do?

Thanks for any and all information.

Brian
 

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It's been about 18 months since Shane went on his 7 month deployment, I wonder how his storage efforts went?
 

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How long will the DEF last in the tank?
That's a good point about the DEF. Wonder if it's best to drain the tank before storage so it doesn't evaporate and or crystalize while it's sitting, depending on storage length.
If the storage conditions are cool enough, the DEF should be good for up to two years.
 
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