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I see quite a few first time travel trailer towers using the Eco Diesels. I believe this truck is a perfect match to many of the newer ultra lite TT's. Get out there and Enjoy your Eco and TT. My Coachman Apex dry weight with accessories is just under 6300lbs and tows great. Ensure you use a good weight distribution hitch. Be religious on setting the travel trailer tire pressure. I check mine cold before leaving house and again before leaving campground. The ST trailer tires must be at proper cold PSI and must not exceed speed rating as they will get hot and may tear apart. Happy Camping!
 

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A “joke” the wife and I talk of is seeing trailers with blown tires and acting surprised. Happened to me multiple times. Inflation pressure, overload, bad trailer tires and dry rot are all common causes.

Good reminder to all.
 

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Just replaced the tires on my TT with Goodyear Endurance D rated, heading out on first long tow of the year but will be checking and monitoring tires for inflation and heat. Agree with JohnnyLongHair don't let them get hot and mind your speed.
 

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I have an E-Z tire monitor for the trailer. It works great. I had one tire go down to 58 psi over the winter and the alarm went off when I was moving the trailer in my yard to do my spring inspection. I keep my tire pressures at 65 psi because of the heavy trailer weight...in the 8k neighborhood.

What surprises me is how high the pressures will go while driving on the highway. I had set my high pressure alarm to go off at something like 70 psi when I first set it up.
After about 2 hrs of driving all 4 high pressure alarms had gone off. I now hav the high pressure alarms set at 78 or 80 psi because I see pressures as high as 75 psi on the highway.

Manufacturers don't tell you what the high pressures should be when driving.
 

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Great reminder, Johnny. I need to make tire checks one of the items on my hook-up-and-go routine. I just picked up one of those infrared temp sensors so I can "shoot" the bearings, tires, etc to check the temps.

Question: My new TT tires are inflated with nitrogen (they have the green caps on the stems.) Should I be worried about mixing good ole air with the nitrogen? Does nitrogen change the pressure requirements?

Bob
 

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I second the recommendation for a tire pressure monitoring system for your travel trailer. eTrailer, Tweeteys and several others sell the systems for $2-300. Money well spent if it prevents a blowout that usually does serious damage to the trailer before you can get stopped. As far as the nitrogen fill, air is already 78% nitrogen. The only advantage is there is no moisture in the nitrogen fill. As long as your air source is relatively dry there's no reason not to add plain old air when needed. (my opinion - worth all you paid for it).
 

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2017 1500 Tradesman Ecodiesel 4x4 Quad Cab 3.55 Gears
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A “joke” the wife and I talk of is seeing trailers with blown tires and acting surprised. Happened to me multiple times. Inflation pressure, overload, bad trailer tires and dry rot are all common causes.

Good reminder to all.
Just came back from a "Top of the World Hwy" 4th of July run to Dawson, Yukon and had one myself. First I thought I heard a "whop" sound, looked out the left, rear view mirror, the old TT had a bit of a list to her. Picked up a nail.

The real shocker was the $40 CAD to have it fixed!

I think it's time for a new set, they sure take a pounding up here.

from the Dome
Dawson.jpg
 

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Great reminder, Johnny. I need to make tire checks one of the items on my hook-up-and-go routine. I just picked up one of those infrared temp sensors so I can "shoot" the bearings, tires, etc to check the temps.

Question: My new TT tires are inflated with nitrogen (they have the green caps on the stems.) Should I be worried about mixing good ole air with the nitrogen? Does nitrogen change the pressure requirements?

Bob
Air is something like 80% nitrogen. does not matter the exact percentage. Does matter that trailer tires are not race tires. Same can said for most on-road vehicles. Nitrogen is useful in flat-out racing environments as it tends to maintain pressure better than air. Being mostly
nitrogen, air is fine. Nitrogen is also good for the economy. Dealers and tire shops make a whole lot of money selling nitrogen to the gullible who are unaware of the facts. It's kind of like the "snake-oil" medicine salesman. No harm, no foul and the money rolls in.
 

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My boat trailer tires are 2 years old and still look great. I park it between 2 TT's, so they rarely see the sun when stored. Keep them at 55 PSI and never go above 70 on the road (75 speed rated). Usually stay around 65. All that info is on the side of the tire (I figure most people know this, but some may not).
 

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One of the advantages of using nitrogen in tires your truck or trailer is that it will have less pressure change per degree of temperature rise because of the lack of moisture,
the moisture in the air in your tires is the major component which expands from the heat generated by a flexing tire increasing the tire pressure reading.
If you have access to dry air (dew point of -60) it will behave much as nitrogen does.
 

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One of the advantages of using nitrogen in tires your truck or trailer is that it will have less pressure change per degree of temperature rise because of the lack of moisture,
the moisture in the air in your tires is the major component which expands from the heat generated by a flexing tire increasing the tire pressure reading.
If you have access to dry air (dew point of -60) it will behave much as nitrogen does.

Is totally splitting hairs in our environment
half empty
or Half full?
 

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I thought there would be more discussion about TPMS systems for trailer tires. What works and what to stay away from. Amazon has some, camping has some that are more expensive (like most of their stuff). What is everyones experience, other than "keep them at the proper pressure". I understand that much.
 

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I thought there would be more discussion about TPMS systems for trailer tires. What works and what to stay away from. Amazon has some, camping has some that are more expensive (like most of their stuff). What is everyones experience, other than "keep them at the proper pressure". I understand that much.
I agree. I've seen lots of post recommending to have a TPMS system but no specific recommendations. I'd rather not make the same mistake someone else has already if I can avoid it.

By the way, I'm from Hartville. Good to see another EcoD owner from our area ;-)

Bob
 

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One of the advantages of using nitrogen in tires your truck or trailer is that it will have less pressure change per degree of temperature rise because of the lack of moisture,
the moisture in the air in your tires is the major component which expands from the heat generated by a flexing tire increasing the tire pressure reading.
If you have access to dry air (dew point of -60) it will behave much as nitrogen does.
78% of the air we breathe is nitrogen. If you're racing a car around a track at 200 mph for 500 miles, the other 22% might make a difference. If it's your daily driver... not so much. That nitrogen in your tires is a scam. Just check 'em every other fill up.
 
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