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Discussion Starter #1
Reading through the forums, I came across these pictures and the OP story and information on how his Cummins ran away. He slid off the road and left it running for approximately 30-45 miles while unsticking it . While the driver was trying to get his truck unstuck,his engine ran away apparently from this SLIGHT angle his truck started sucking the oil into his CCV filter ? Now to novice diesel owners a run away Diesel engine happens when it starts burning it's own oil for a fuel a supply or a injector pump goes crazy on older diesels and it begins screaming excessive RPM's then catastrophic failure happens and there's no way to shut it off except shutting off all air to they engine .

IMG_1629.JPG . IMG_1628.JPG . BTW he did blow his engine ...
 

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Holy crap. Is the CCV filter an aftermarket job like a ‘catch can’ or is a OEM design? I’ve never heard of a diesel running away. Now I have. Thanks for the read.


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Holy crap. Is the CCV filter an aftermarket job like a ‘catch can’ or is a OEM design? I’ve never heard of a diesel running away. Now I have. Thanks for the read.


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no its not an aftermarket item to my knowledge, and that does not seem bto be an extreme angle. something missing here. runaways are always a possibility with a diesel.
 

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I had an old VW rabbit diesel with about 400K miles on it. The PCV line ran back into the air filter box. The car had a bad case of blow by and oil and vapors would collect in the air filter box. Usually going down the interstate at 75 mph ( about max speed) the engine would run away. With the Rabbit if you let off gas pedal and the car did not slow down you were in runaway. To stop it just put on the brakes while in gear and pull over and clean the air filter box to fix it. If you took it out of gear or used the clutch the engine would blow up. Good thing in high gear the brakes would overcome the engine power and stop the car. This was not an uncommon thing with high mileage Rabbits. Not a bad experience if you know what is happening but the first time can be quite an experience. To prevent it you just needed to make sure the inside of air filter box was clean.
ECL
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The CCV filter is located inside and on the top in the valve cover which has a breather tube feeding the intake of air system,which Cummins recommended R+R the CCV filter is around 60k . BTW this is a factory set up NOT AFTERMARKET...

I don't believe the original OP has or did anything wrong, his story seems accurate for someone posting with limited Diesel knowledge. I believe this story should catch the eyes of FCA/ Cummins engineers . Maybe the truck went into regen,creating additional fuel vapors? And everything lined up perfectly to destroy his engine .

Folks catastrophic failures usually consist of several small issues which combined lead to one BIG FAILURE....Anyone who has ever worked in the automotive industry for years know what I'm talking about...
 

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Relating your rabbit diesel story to the Cummins. I highly doubt the brakes would overcome the Cummins. That would be a terror ride. Maybe before the brakes got Hot you could jam it into 1st gear? Or even the ED for that matter.
 

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The CCV filter is located inside and on the top in the valve cover which has a breather tube feeding the intake of air system,which Cummins recommended R+R the CCV filter is around 60k . BTW this is a factory set up NOT AFTERMARKET...

I don't believe the original OP has or did anything wrong, his story seems accurate for someone posting with limited Diesel knowledge. I believe this story should catch the eyes of FCA/ Cummins engineers . Maybe the truck went into regen,creating additional fuel vapors? And everything lined up perfectly to destroy his engine .

Folks catastrophic failures usually consist of several small issues which combined lead to one BIG FAILURE....Anyone who has ever worked in the automotive industry for years know what I'm talking about...
i dont necessarily think this story is bologna. ibjust think there is more to it since thats not a crazy angle
 

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It's early 1972. I am a 23 year old USAF sergeant stationed in the Republic of Korea. I am working in the construction equipment shot at Osan AFB. My task on that morning was to get a diesel powered mobile generator working. I diagnosed the problem to a faulty injector and by some logistical miracle there was one in stock. Replaced it, fired it up and let it run for a few minutes. As I turned to return a wrench to my tool box the generator roared like a jet engine. Luckily the oil bath air filter was still sitting on the floor so I had access to the intake. I started stuffing shop rags in and after a bit the engine choked to a stop.

When a diesel runs away it can be very scary. I knew what was happening and had immediate access to the engine. It still took a while to shut it down. I can imagine the panic of someone who has no idea what is happening and has no idea what to do to shut the damn thing off.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Shaggn .... Your opinion on such a slight angle is the same as mine and EVERYONE reading his post with so far about 4pages of basically disbelief,and not with the creditably of OP 's post at all , This is why I called it very interesting....

And to add a little more apparently it broke a rod and it went out the block or oil pan ...
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It's early 1972. I am a 23 year old USAF sergeant stationed in the Republic of Korea. I am working in the construction equipment shot at Osan AFB. My task on that morning was to get a diesel powered mobile generator working. I diagnosed the problem to a faulty injector and by some logistical miracle there was one in stock. Replaced it, fired it up and let it run for a few minutes. As I turned to return a wrench to my tool box the generator roared like a jet engine. Luckily the oil bath air filter was still sitting on the floor so I had access to the intake. I started stuffing shop rags in and after a bit the engine choked to a stop.

When a diesel runs away it can be very scary. I knew what was happening and had immediate access to the engine. It still took a while to shut it down. I can imagine the panic of someone who has no idea what is happening and has no idea what to do to shut the damn thing off.
Was it a Detroit 671?
 

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Was it a Detroit 671?
Too long ago to remember and a mil-spec unit. Sizeable inline 4. Mechanical injectors, of course. Those rags weren't exactly clean so the injectors had to come out for cleaning. Ended up ordering rebuild kits and fixing them all.
 

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So what would you do if our ED had a runaway situation while driving? Would the brakes be enough to over come it or we would have to throw it in neutral and let it die?


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Anyone working in the oil patch and driving a diesel is generally required to have the vehicle fitted with a positive air shut-off valve. This prevents vapour leaks at the work site or well site from triggering diesel runaways and potentially explosions that would ignite the vapours and cause catastrophic damage.

Sample of such a valve: Headwind Solutions
 
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All I see is a relatively new megacab high centered having skidded off an Icey road.
That’s out of control not a runaway diesel.
 

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You have to read & comprehend what HnG wrote.. not just look at the pictures. ;)
 

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Anyone working in the oil patch and driving a diesel is generally required to have the vehicle fitted with a positive air shut-off valve. This prevents vapour leaks at the work site or well site from triggering diesel runaways and potentially explosions that would ignite the vapours and cause catastrophic damage.

Sample of such a valve: Headwind Solutions
i think the ed has an air control valve, i remember seeing a pic of it. not sure if its capable of closing down the intake completely. i was looking into one of those valves... they are very expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
The owner of the runaway Cummins is a former EcoDiesel owner and a member on our forum as well , His thread is up to 9pages of speculation and basically disbelief. No one is the questioning his credibility of the post only guessing circumstances that lead up to a runaway blown engine. Some folks think circumstances from running off the road did something to the trucks wiring causing the runaway? Again most folks just shocked ....

Owner went back to scene and figured out angles ,appears the rear wheels where 5ft lower than front wheels .Owner is also trying to figure out who should pay for engine,his own auto insurance? Try to get FCA/ Cummins involved and pay ? Something to think about if you slide off the road in freezing temperatures and maybe you have a young family or elderly folks with you ,Do you shut off your truck or leave it running and risk an engine ?

IMOP .... Cummins/ FCA should be sending engineers / technicians very promptly to the exact accident scene and try to re-create identically the runaway engine circumstances....
 

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although incredibly uncommon in newer computer controlled diesels there are a number of possibilities that could have caused this situation. Crankcase over full on oil, wouldn't be hard to do especially if excessively idled and driven in town a lot, regen has been known to cause fuel dilution in the oil in about all trucks with a DPF system, or simply overfilled when last changed, 3 gallons should be easy to figure out, but weirder things have happened. Also turbocharger failure is very common with the HE351VNT unit cummins uses on these motors, if it let go it could have created the perfect storm for an engine run away scenario. It's always a good idea to carry a fire extinguisher in your vehicle, especially if you own a diesel, spray the Co2 into the intake and you will starve the engine of the oxygen needed to burn whatever it has turned into its fuel.
 
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