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Discussion Starter #1
After reading all the oil threads regarding the 2020 ecodiesel I was under the impression that Shell Rotella T6 was NOT approved for the 3rd. generation ecodiesel, and that the factory recommendation was to use Pennzoil Ultra Euro 5w-40, or any of the other brands that have been previously mentioned as acceptable. So after having the dealer change my oil at 10k, I noticed that they put in Rotella T6. The service manager swore that this was the correct oil and that that was all that the factory sends the dealerships. I subsequently called 3 other local dealers and they all stated that that was indeed the oil that is now used.. Has Shell changed the formula or has something else happened that I was not aware of in regard to Rotella T6?
 

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If I owned the GEN3 ecodiesel I would run this Redline 5w-40 oil, the Redline is a Group V Ester Synthetic oil, expensive yes but these engines are even more expensive so in the end running the very best oil is really not so expensive after all.


Open the link and fill out the capability information and this is the correct oil for the GEN3 ecodiesel from Redline.

I have a 2019 GEN2 ecodiesel and I run Redline 15w-40 Diesel oil in it, the capability information lists the 15w-40 Diesel oil for the GEN2 ecodiesel.

 

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T6 is very good diesel oil. I have no clue what is approved oil for the Gen 3’s. FCA has historically changed oil recommendations. I would not fret on this at all.
 

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Take it for what this is worth too. If your dealer performed the oil change and they used an unapproved oil (cannot speak to T6 myself, although was hoping it was usable in the 3rd gen ED), then the liability for failures would fall to them. Just make sure you keep your service tickets/receipts. Yes there is the chance of major inconvenience if it does fail for reasons relating to the oil, but short of some misunderstanding, the dealer/FCA would be on the hook for the repairs. No doubt someone can correct me if I'm mistaken here though.
 

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Per the most recent owner's manual "We recommend you use 5W-40 synthetic engine oil such as Mopar that meets FCA Material Standard MS-12991 and the API SN engine oil category is required."

Unless the formula for T6 just changed, it is still API CK-4 (per Shell's website) and does not meet Ram's requirements for the Gen 3 Ecodiesel. I've had to fight with my dealership both times I took mine in for a change to have the correct oil installed, they grabbed the T6 each time.
 

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Shell has a 1 800 number for oil questions they have been very helpful to me in the past it's probably worth a call.
 

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Just choose an oil that meets the API SN spec and you are fine, don't get caught up in the you have to use the MOPAR Material Standard spec, that is only recommended by FCA to drive traffic to the dealers service department, if you notice all the manufactures write their owners manual with confusing language such as in the FCA owner manuals where they state:

"We recommend you use 5W-40 synthetic engine oil such as Mopar that meets FCA Material Standard MS-12991 and the API SN engine oil category is required."

Notice how they used the word "and" in that sentence? The only requirement is using an oil that can meet the API "SN" spec, the MOPAR Material Standard MS-12991 is only recommended.

Before Fiat purchased Chrysler the oil supplier to Chrysler was Exxon/Mobil but when Fiat purchased Chrysler they dropped Exxon/Mobil and changed the Chrysler brands over to Shell because Fiat used Shell as their supplier.

When the new FCA company did that overnight Exxon/Mobil oils all of the sudden no longer met the FCA specs to be used in the same vehicles they had been supplying Chrysler with for years. Why? Because FCA made up new Material Standard spec numbers. Even Shell did not list the new Material Standard spec numbers at first.

Keep in mind that any Material Standard Spec can not alter the oils formula from the API spec in this case the SN spec, if the Material Standard spec alters the formula of the SN oil causing it to no longer meet the SN spec then the oil can no longer carry the API "SN" donut on it because it no longer meets the API "SN" spec.

See where I am going with this, FCA says "the API SN engine oil category is required" while the beginning of that sentence says "We recommend you use 5w-40 synthetic engine oil such as MOPAR that meets FCA Material Standard MS-12991".

Even the oil grade is only recommended and not required, "We recommend you use 5w-40 synthetic engine oil". As long as you are using an API "SN" spec oil you are good to go.

People that live in warm climates like in South Florida have no need to run a 5w-40 oil so a 15w-40 oil is fine as long as it meets the API "SN" spec. People in cold climates would benefit from a 5w-40 grade oil.

The reason manufactures now show just one grade like the 5w-40 in the manual is because you get some clown who lives up north where he would need a 5w-40 oil and because the manual listed a 15w-40 for warmer areas that clown used the 15w-40 where he should have used the 5w-40 and ends up damaging the engine. Where I live we have mild winters and I would rather have the 15w-40 grade oil for the film strength to protect the bottom end bearings better.

If FCA required you to use MOPAR oil with the MS-12991 spec they would be required to provide you with the oil free of charge while the vehicle was under warranty per the Maguson-Moss warranty act. The Maguson-Moss warranty act was created because manufactures were voiding warranties if you did not use only their OEM parts and fluids in their cars. The Maguson-Moss warranty act prevents a manufacture from voiding your warranty because you did not use the manufactures OEM parts/fluids and if the manufacture requires you to use their OEM parts/fluids while while under warranty then the manufacture has to provide the parts/fluids free of charge to the customer.
 

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Heck, if that's the case, why don't we just get the Amazon Basics SN+ 5W40 oil delivered to the house for $29 bucks per box? ^^^^
 

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Just choose an oil that meets the API SN spec and you are fine, don't get caught up in the you have to use the MOPAR Material Standard spec, that is only recommended by FCA to drive traffic to the dealers service department, if you notice all the manufactures write their owners manual with confusing language such as in the FCA owner manuals where they state:

"We recommend you use 5W-40 synthetic engine oil such as Mopar that meets FCA Material Standard MS-12991 and the API SN engine oil category is required."

Notice how they used the word "and" in that sentence? The only requirement is using an oil that can meet the API "SN" spec, the MOPAR Material Standard MS-12991 is only recommended.

Before Fiat purchased Chrysler the oil supplier to Chrysler was Exxon/Mobil but when Fiat purchased Chrysler they dropped Exxon/Mobil and changed the Chrysler brands over to Shell because Fiat used Shell as their supplier.

When the new FCA company did that overnight Exxon/Mobil oils all of the sudden no longer met the FCA specs to be used in the same vehicles they had been supplying Chrysler with for years. Why? Because FCA made up new Material Standard spec numbers. Even Shell did not list the new Material Standard spec numbers at first.

Keep in mind that any Material Standard Spec can not alter the oils formula from the API spec in this case the SN spec, if the Material Standard spec alters the formula of the SN oil causing it to no longer meet the SN spec then the oil can no longer carry the API "SN" donut on it because it no longer meets the API "SN" spec.

See where I am going with this, FCA says "the API SN engine oil category is required" while the beginning of that sentence says "We recommend you use 5w-40 synthetic engine oil such as MOPAR that meets FCA Material Standard MS-12991".

Even the oil grade is only recommended and not required, "We recommend you use 5w-40 synthetic engine oil". As long as you are using an API "SN" spec oil you are good to go.

People that live in warm climates like in South Florida have no need to run a 5w-40 oil so a 15w-40 oil is fine as long as it meets the API "SN" spec. People in cold climates would benefit from a 5w-40 grade oil.

The reason manufactures now show just one grade like the 5w-40 in the manual is because you get some clown who lives up north where he would need a 5w-40 oil and because the manual listed a 15w-40 for warmer areas that clown used the 15w-40 where he should have used the 5w-40 and ends up damaging the engine. Where I live we have mild winters and I would rather have the 15w-40 grade oil for the film strength to protect the bottom end bearings better.

If FCA required you to use MOPAR oil with the MS-12991 spec they would be required to provide you with the oil free of charge while the vehicle was under warranty per the Maguson-Moss warranty act. The Maguson-Moss warranty act was created because manufactures were voiding warranties if you did not use only their OEM parts and fluids in their cars. The Maguson-Moss warranty act prevents a manufacture from voiding your warranty because you did not use the manufactures OEM parts/fluids and if the manufacture requires you to use their OEM parts/fluids while while under warranty then the manufacture has to provide the parts/fluids free of charge to the customer.
In school i was taught that "and" meant both, not either or. The ms standard is a more specific list of requirements the SN catagory oil must meet. At least that is my take. No FCA cannot require you to use their own brand of oil but they can require you to use an oil that meets their specs.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
All your replies are very interesting and informative but none address my original point. Why are dealers using Rotella T-6 when doing oil changes on the 3rd. generation Ecodiesel? Did not Shell themselves state that Rotella T-6 did not meet the required specs for this engine? How many of you have had your oil changed by the dealer and found that they have used T-6? Has this oil now been certified by FCA as appropriate? I know that there are tons of approved oils that I could use if I was doing my own change but I chose to have the dealer do this one for convenience and they used T-6 and stated that this was what they had been instructed by FCA to use. Comments??
 

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This is but one reason why I've chosen to DIY oil and filter changes. Dealers seem to be clueless on this matter, and besides that I love Amsoil products, which is what I use.
 

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All your replies are very interesting and informative but none address my original point. Why are dealers using Rotella T-6 when doing oil changes on the 3rd. generation Ecodiesel? Did not Shell themselves state that Rotella T-6 did not meet the required specs for this engine? How many of you have had your oil changed by the dealer and found that they have used T-6? Has this oil now been certified by FCA as appropriate? I know that there are tons of approved oils that I could use if I was doing my own change but I chose to have the dealer do this one for convenience and they used T-6 and stated that this was what they had been instructed by FCA to use. Comments??
Post #6 might help you. "Shell has a 1 800 number for oil questions they have been very helpful to me in the past it's probably worth a call."
 

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All your replies are very interesting and informative but none address my original point. Why are dealers using Rotella T-6 when doing oil changes on the 3rd. generation Ecodiesel? Did not Shell themselves state that Rotella T-6 did not meet the required specs for this engine? How many of you have had your oil changed by the dealer and found that they have used T-6? Has this oil now been certified by FCA as appropriate? I know that there are tons of approved oils that I could use if I was doing my own change but I chose to have the dealer do this one for convenience and they used T-6 and stated that this was what they had been instructed by FCA to use. Comments??
Here's the deal. LOTS of dealers are really bad about communicating with FCA. For example: In 2018 the Jeep Wrangler 3.6L gas engine switched to a new 5-quart oil pan. The owners manuals stated to use 5 quarts of oil. Dealers all over the nation were using 6.5 quarts because for the past 25 years every six-cylinder in a Wrangler used 6.5 quarts. They didn't pay any attention to the new information coming from FCA.

Same thing is going on here. The EcoDiesel used Rotella T6 up through 2019. FCA redesigned 80% of the engine and updated the oil to a completely new spec. Dealerships didn't bother looking at the information. They still think it's the same engine because they are too lazy to verify specs on each model year individually. To answer the question: most of them are not using Rotella T6 because they think it's a better oil. Most are using it because they have no idea that the specification has changed. It's ignorance, not intention. They're operating on old information.

You need to show your dealership the owners manual so they are aware of the switch. And then verify that they used the correct oil by checking part #s on your sales receipt.
 
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I had to tell my dealer when the Gen 2 oil change happened. I had them download the new diesel supplement to verify.
 
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