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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm sure that this has been discussed before, but I'm not finding the thread. I'm also a first time diesel owner (drive 3/4 and 1 ton diesels at work all the time, but don't know much about them), so forgive me.

In the user guide (fourth edition), page 145 under "Diesel Break-In Recommendations" it states that there is no break-in period, and provides some, I would call, precautionary recommendations for normal operation. It then goes on to say that under a note that light duty use (light loads or light/no trailering) will extend the time it takes for the engine to reach full efficiency. So, when is the engine at full efficiency, and wouldn't this be the "break-in period" until it reaches full efficiency?
 

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A new engine wants to be run hard a bit so the rings will fully seat. The "light duty might extend...." reference is there to discourage folks from babying their new truck. People can have funny ideas and some might treat the new engine like a snowflake.

The other issue is work-hardening the drivetrain. Ram asks that you don't leave the dealer lot towing 10k lbs. They'd like you to give the truck a couple hundred miles so the gears in the diff and tranny have a chance to work harden before serious sustained heavy duty work.

So for the first couple hundred miles don't drive it like a snowflake, nor spend the entire time pulling a house.

It is not unusual for engines to gain in efficiency slightly as some 10's of thousands of miles get under their belt. They loosen up a bit internally.
 

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You will also find that the engine needs to be warmed up a bit to run right. Idling does nothing. Run and pull with the truck for a good 8 miles or so. All of a sudden it will feel "right" and start to show good fuel mileage.
 

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The only engine I really know anything about is 80's BMW engines. After we build one and install it, we run it for a moment to ensure nothing crazy is going on, then we take the car to a dyno. Usually on the 2nd dyno pull you can hear the engine note change as the rings "seat" and compression goes up.
 

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It will be interesting as we get miles on these to see if the MPG's go up. I know with the Cummins after about 60-70,000 miles it would really loosen up and you would notice the mpg's going up. Remember these engines are really heavily built. This is a 3.0L engine and it weighs 30 more pounds than the 5.7L Hemi.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Back form work now, weird schedule today (had to go shooting. Yes I get paid to shoot guns).

But before going to work, I finally took our 16' RV trailer out for a spin. It was only about a 20 mile round trip, but I wasn't very comfortable with how the truck ran. That might be due to the fact that it's essentially uphill both ways. The truck accelerated just fine but mostly stayed in 7th, even where the road is flat, and only on the down grades would it shift into 8th. I tried both trailer tow on and off and it didn't seem to make any difference. The trailer only weighs about 2500 lbs dry, but it's a vintage 1969 trailer as well, and the aerodynamics aren't very aerodynamic.The truck has about 1100 miles on it with a 400+ mile round highway round trip. I think I need work it some more as I feel I may have unintentionally babied it.

Thanks for the info guys..
 

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Bet it's normal.

When I towed my toy hauler it never got into 8th, no matter how I messed with the tow-haul mode. My truck just seemed to be dragging and took a lot of pedal all the time, more so out of tow-haul mode.

I have to PAY to shoot, like most. Powder, bullets, primers, hazmat fees, cases, travel, loading equipment etc. Sinclair knows me on a first-name basis. Sounds like you have a good gig going on.
 
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