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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Asking a question now.

I'm used to a manual transmission. The "slush box" transmission in my Ecodiesel Ram is not remotely as responsive as what I'm used to. In reverse it's even worse. Feels like the clutch is slipping more than when it's in "drive". I mean, I have to really increase the throttle to rev the motor way more than I'm used to for the truck to go. Now this is not really true on flat, paved ground as the darn thing will roll backwards and crash if I don't have the brake on. I mean tipped forward on dirt or grass. Even a small hump behind the truck will severely retard movement in reverse.

If mine is slipping in reverse compared to others, it wlll be trouble using the front tow hooks to pull something out in reverse. There would be trouble backing a trailer or load up a hill.

I know there's no real "clutch" to slip. These automatics don't have a traditional clutch but something connects the motor to the drivetrain. Whatever it is, mine's not worth a crap in reverse. What about yours?
 

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Actually all automatic boxes have clutch packs, so in theory, there could be slippage. Most likely not, but...*shrugs*

I recall you mentioning you were concerned about your transmission's health after pulling a stump. Anything ever come of that, or has the truck been fine since then?

Based on owning and driving both types of transmissions, I'd say what you're experiencing is about right - auto boxes tend to be a bit "slower" in reverse, but it's simply a factor of the gearing chosen. Not sure it would actually stop the truck from doing anything, as I doubt RAM forgot to test towing limits in reverse.
 

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i have to say i can relate to what capt is saying .... first few times i put in reverse in the driveway i was a little taken back by how much throttle i had to give to get moving. i have a very very slight incline that i back up on from driveway, i mean its really minimal. but put my 4runner in reverse and it starts to move. put the ED in reverse and it just sat there until i really gave it some throttle. i'm used to it now, but capt here's one random internet guy telling you - i noticed the same thing!
 

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Our VW with the DSG transmission just sits there when put into reverse...until I give it some pedal, it'll sit for a few seconds, blissfully still...

But, breathe on the pedal and it's all full in reverse. ;)

New systems require us to learn - its been that way throughout time - nothing different here.
 

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Experienced this over the weekend just backing into the driveway. Front tires were in the gap between the street and curb (sloped, not the old school squared curbs), gave it some throttle, no movement...1/4 throttle, no change, 1/2, no change, 3/4 still no change.

Put it in drive, pulled forward a bit and into reverse again and just kept going up the curb with the momentum generated. That was incredibly annoying and had me wondering "what if I ever have to back up on an incline? I'm screwed!"
 

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It's been discussed elsewhere about how this automatic is geared high in reverse. That would be the main cause of the extra effort to back up. If I remember right it is geared almost twice as high in reverse as first gear. I'll look for the numbers. Looks like first gear is 4.696 to 1 reverse is 3.3 to 1 second gear is 3.1 to 1 so reverse is almost as high as second gear. Looks like a combination of a fairly loose torque converter and high gearing.
 

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I can relate to this. I tried backing my travel trailer up a slight incline at the storage yard (sand base) and I had a tough time. Like you said, you really have to get into the throttle to get a solid response. Pavement is fine but there I really noticed it. Gearing seems to be the culprit

Sent from my SGH-I747M using Tapatalk
 

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Takes a lot of throttle to back up my driveway. It's 600 feet and a variable incline from 6 0/0 to 8 0/0 plus. My Dakota with 4.7 and 3.92 rear actually takes less throttle it seems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
WOW! Thanks for all the information. It's a revelation to me and surely to others. Never thought of the gear ratio and immediately am thinking of low range in reverse if I have to pull heavy or steep. Pickups
don't do well in reverse without bed weight so 4 wheel drive would be used anyhow. Your information is bad to read if you have a two-wheel-drive pickup. You don't have that low range option. Screwed.

No issues that I know of from pulling that stump out. Forward seems normal in my limited automatic experience.
 

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I just figured this out! It's got nothing to do with gear ratios!

This is a learning transmission, so it being "slow" in reverse is because you're causing it to unlearn everything it's learned to that point! Basically, you're being a bad truck parent!
Lol exactly
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Was a math, science and Reading Specialist. Later in my "career", I ran the Alternative Ed. program. Many were slow. Many more were slow to learn lessons in how to get along with others and make life successful.

Some of that slow learning might have rubbed off.
 

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Captainmal. When you did your stump extraction a few weeks ago, were you using reverse?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
No.

Did back up the toy hauler once but conditions were dry on flat grass with no issues.
 
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