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I know others have already said this, but that dealer is full of it. I'm not sure any dealer can be that ignorant of the history of this engine, and if it were me I would accuse them of fraud.

They know about the AEM, they know it's covered by the warranty, and now by a recall. But they see that you are an uninformed consumer and they are trying to take advantage of you.

It seems likely to me that they would take your $6000, do the warranty paperwork with chrysler and pocket the warranty payment too. "Hey, double payday for us, and the idiot customer doesn't know the difference!"

make sure your FCA customer care rep knows all this, and call out the dealership on it too. Very Loudly, In the middle of their showroom, so all the other customers hear

Edit: I want to clarify from the above that I don't think you're an idiot, and I hope you're not offended by my post. By your own admission you're not mechanically inclined, and don't fully understand what the dealer has explained; but your intuition told you something didn't seem right and you came seeking more experienced advice. That alone puts you head and shoulders above the truly ignorant who will take it in the shorts and walk away smiling.

I only hope the advice and knowledge you find here can help you resolve this and any future issues.
I was thinking the same thing as obviously the dealer gets paid either way whether from customer or FCA however I'm guessing if from FCA its the bare minimum reimbursement so if at all possible a crappy dealer will pass on a repair to a customer?

Bring the AEM paper work in and show them where it states this crap is covered.
 

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Oh I'm worried now. I keep getting codes P2D2D and P200A which I think has to do with the EGR and I've got Chrysler's 100k mile extended warranty
P200A = binding swirl valves , soot build up in intake .
at one point the little plastic gears that operate the swirl valves will break ,
as seen in those images posted by Irongardenexpress,
intake taken apart to see the insides.
When tuned the swirl valves are open and stay like that ,
like the Banks intake that does not have swirl valves ,
they are there only to distribute the hot gases from the EGR so that they
don't heat up the same exact spot , when tuned there are no such
gases entering intake , so no need for swirl valves .




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they are there only to distribute the hot gases from the EGR so that they
don't heat up the same exact spot , when tuned there are no such
gases entering intake , so no need for swirl valves .
Swirl valves are designed to swirl the air at idle and low rpm for better combustion. I don't think it has anything to do with EGR. I know that the VW TDI also has the swirl valves.
 

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wiki- "In a typical implementation the flaps will be closed at idle speed, creating additional turbulence in the intake. As engine speed increases, the flaps are gradually opened until, at around 2,000 rpm, they are parallel to the airflow and present virtually no resistance. Their purpose is to ensure that the air entering the cylinder is sufficiently turbulent for good fuel-air mixing even at low engine speeds."



Swirl flaps

Fig. 1: Swirl flap: swirl in axial direction of the piston
Left: part load, swirl flap closed, strong swirling
Right: full load, swirl flap open, high filling level
T
two channels for each cylinder:
Swirl flaps (highlighted in red) in the Pierburg intake manifold, e.g. in the Opel Astra J 1.7 CDTi


Swirl flaps produce a swirl alongside the cylinder axle. They are used in diesel vehicles to improve the mixing of the fuel-air mixture at low engine speeds. For this purpose, the air is fed to each cylinder through two separate channels in the intake manifold. One of the two channels can be closed with a swirl flap. This creates a swirling of the fresh air. Better mixing reduces fuel consumption and pollutant emission. At higher engine speeds and torques, the swirl flap is opened to achieve a better filling level. The swirl flaps are also opened at starting of the engine and in overrun condition.

Swirl flaps are also called "inlet duct cutoffs". In the Opel Twinport engine, the swirl flap reduces the throttle losses during part-load operation.


Tumble flaps

Tumble flap: swirl vertical to axial direction of the piston,
Left: stratified charge; Right: homogenous operation

Tumble flaps (highlighted in red) in the Pierburg intake manifold, e.g. in the Mercedes E-Class 500

Tumble flaps produce a swirl alongside the cylinder axle. This is achieved by either dividing the air intake channel into two separate channels, of which one channel can be closed by the tumble flap (see image), or by turning one flap sideways into the air flow (see photo).
Tumble flaps are used in vehicles with petrol direct injection (e.g. in FSI engines) to realise a stratified charge. In the stratified charge operation, by means of this specifically produced air flow and a special geometry of the piston, the fuel-air mixture is agglomerated directly around the spark plug, and ignited. Therefore, there is clean air in the marginal areas of the combustion chamber. The clean air serves as insulation during combustion and reduces heat loss. Further reduction of consumption is achieved by dethrottling the engine.

At higher engine speeds and torques, the tumble flap is opened to achieve a better filling level. During this so-called homogenous operation, the engine functions like a conventional fuel injection engine, but with higher efficiency due to the higher compression. This enables a reduction of fuel consumption in the low engine speed range, without sustaining losses of power or torque at higher engine speeds.
Tumble flaps are also called “charge-motion flaps”.
 

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2015 Ecodiesel - 64,000 miles


About 3 weeks ago I was driving home going about 70 on the freeway and out of no where, my truck seemed to lose power. Everything stayed on like normal, but I wasn't able to accelerate. The oil pressure light turned on as I managed to get to the shoulder & turn the truck off. I left it off for a few minutes and tried turning it back on. I turned the key, but it didn't want to turn over. Eventually after a few minutes, it started and the oil pressure light turned off, only to be replaced by a check engine light & a message to service the electronic throttle control. I was able to drive it to the dealership (barely) while it sounded like a humming noise came from the engine.


It was at the dealer for a few days when they called me and told me the air intake was melted on the inside and had to call Chrysler engineering to get a tech out there because they never seen that happen before. About a week later they called me back telling me there was soot build up which melted the air intake, and caused the EGR valve to stay open. (I am not mechanically savvy at all, so I'm not sure what that means). All in all, I was told the intake manifold, fuel filter, air filter, several fuel lines , EGR valve and EGR components would have to be replaced and to expect a $6000 bill.


I'm never the person to try and complain to get something for cheaper or even free, but they were telling me I had to pay it all myself because it wouldn't be covered under warranty. Maybe I'm missing something, but how is something like that not under warranty. They said even though the EGR is under emissions warranty, the soot buildup would be considered negligence and since the EGR wasn't the root of the problem, I would be stuck with the entirety of the bill.


So is there anyone that experienced something similar to this and maybe has more knowledge as to why it wouldn't be covered under warranty. Thanks in advance.
When I was reading your post I thought I was reading my post. My truck had the exact same thing happen back in July with 85K miles. I was told the EGR valve froze in the open position causing a hole to be burned in my intake manifold. I had to have my truck towed to my local dealership. At first, they said they weren't sure if it would be covered under the drivetrain 100K mileage warranty but in the end, they did cover it and I didn't have to pay anything. My dealer that fixed it for free is Jack Powell in Escondido CA if that helps any.
 

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I too just experienced this on 8 Nov 19. 2016 EcoDiesel w/ 58,960 mi. AEM updated Jun 2019. No engine mods. All service by FCA dealership mechanics. EGR Valve stuck open and Intake Manifold had 3 burned holes. Repaired under warranty.
 

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2015 Ecodiesel - 64,000 miles


About 3 weeks ago I was driving home going about 70 on the freeway and out of no where, my truck seemed to lose power. Everything stayed on like normal, but I wasn't able to accelerate. The oil pressure light turned on as I managed to get to the shoulder & turn the truck off. I left it off for a few minutes and tried turning it back on. I turned the key, but it didn't want to turn over. Eventually after a few minutes, it started and the oil pressure light turned off, only to be replaced by a check engine light & a message to service the electronic throttle control. I was able to drive it to the dealership (barely) while it sounded like a humming noise came from the engine.


It was at the dealer for a few days when they called me and told me the air intake was melted on the inside and had to call Chrysler engineering to get a tech out there because they never seen that happen before. About a week later they called me back telling me there was soot build up which melted the air intake, and caused the EGR valve to stay open. (I am not mechanically savvy at all, so I'm not sure what that means). All in all, I was told the intake manifold, fuel filter, air filter, several fuel lines , EGR valve and EGR components would have to be replaced and to expect a $6000 bill.


I'm never the person to try and complain to get something for cheaper or even free, but they were telling me I had to pay it all myself because it wouldn't be covered under warranty. Maybe I'm missing something, but how is something like that not under warranty. They said even though the EGR is under emissions warranty, the soot buildup would be considered negligence and since the EGR wasn't the root of the problem, I would be stuck with the entirety of the bill.


So is there anyone that experienced something similar to this and maybe has more knowledge as to why it wouldn't be covered under warranty. Thanks in advance.
Did you or have you had coolant loss documented? If you have or had a coolant leak, this is this root of your problem, a cause and effect if you will. Coolant leaked into intake, onto accuumulated soot causing the soot to become a concrete like substance. I had a similar situation but caught it before anything detrimental happened(post AEM and under new warranty). At first they claimed they would only replace the EGR components under warranty, but after filing a claim and working with my service manager, FCA footed the bill. Because the EGR failed causing things downstream to fail. You need to have a polite converstion with your service manager, pressing him based on current recalls and possible coolant loss(egr failure) that it caused the other issues, not lack of maintenance. And keep on your case manager, they will "forget " hoping you do too...
 

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RamItEco, have you had this resolved? Wondering specifically about those codes and if you took it to the dealer to document it?

Also, any coolant loss, too?

Oh I'm worried now. I keep getting codes P2D2D and P200A which I think has to do with the EGR and I've got Chrysler's 100k mile extended warranty
 

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I wonder why they are telling me it's NOT covered. Pretty strange. I opened a case with Chrysler, so we will see where it goes from here.
Because warranty work does not pay them as much as non-warranty work. This is a tactic used by many service departments. Take your truck to a different service deparment that will be honest with you.
 

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Did you or have you had coolant loss documented? If you have or had a coolant leak, this is this root of your problem, a cause and effect if you will. Coolant leaked into intake, onto accuumulated soot causing the soot to become a concrete like substance. I had a similar situation but caught it before anything detrimental happened(post AEM and under new warranty). At first they claimed they would only replace the EGR components under warranty, but after filing a claim and working with my service manager, FCA footed the bill. Because the EGR failed causing things downstream to fail. You need to have a polite converstion with your service manager, pressing him based on current recalls and possible coolant loss(egr failure) that it caused the other issues, not lack of maintenance. And keep on your case manager, they will "forget " hoping you do too...
i had the same thing happen to me but now ram has a recall with no fix and i have a useless truck
 

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I wonder why they are telling me it's NOT covered. Pretty strange. I opened a case with Chrysler, so we will see where it goes from here.
My guess is that they are trying to charge you for the repairs AND they will be billing FCA for warranty work. Essentially they are getting paid twice.
It makes my blood boil when I see dealerships try and do crap like this to the uninformed. Wish I was there to back you up, just because I would love to put those guys in their place.

Don't pay a dime for any repairs at this point. With the AEM being completed on your truck, this should be all covered. Knowledge is power. Read up on your extended warranty and ask more questions here.
 

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The sky is falling with emissions so we need the egr.. Every plugged/melted plastic intake is ending up in a dump somewhere and it will never decompose in 1000 years. Kudos epa and FCA...

Oh wait.. But FCA says we have made a self combustible intake manifold so it doesn't cause any negative effects to the environment once your truck goes up in flames...
 

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The sky is falling with emissions so we need the egr.. Every plugged/melted plastic intake is ending up in a dump somewhere and it will never decompose in 1000 years. Kudos epa and FCA...

Oh wait.. But FCA says we have made a self combustible intake manifold so it doesn't cause any negative effects to the environment once your truck goes up in flames...
Yep, I wonder what the carbon footprint is for all the replacement parts associated with ED egr repairs.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
UPDATE

So I denied repairs at the dealership I had originally took my vehicle too, I still had to pay the $190 diagnostic fee though. About a week after, I took my truck to another dealer in the area, this was on Nov 11. I was honest and told them the whole situation; that I had taken it to the dealership the next town over, the diagnostic they had given me, and the soot build up that the previous service department was telling me about. They took the vehicle and a few days later gave me a call.

They said they had contacted Chrysler, and basically told me that Chrysler claims carbon build up to consumer negligence and that's the way they can get out of warranty repairs. Also, the only way that the current dealership I had my vehicle at can confirm if there is any build up, is to get verbal authorization from me to go ahead and tear the motor down. They told me this is how the situation can go: Option 1- I can refuse authorization to tear down motor, I pay the $190 diagnostic fee, and take my vehicle or Option 2- I give the go ahead for the tear down, they can then either confirm or deny any soot build up. If there is build up, I can still deny repairs to fix the problem, but would have to pay a $180 labor fee for the tear down. If there is NO build up, then it would all be covered under warranty.

So I told them, "well either way I'm going to have to pay about $200 whether or not there you tear down the motor (because remember, I would either pay the diagnostic fee or the labor fee), so go ahead with the tear down, but just know that I will not be paying the $6000 repair if it is NOT covered under warranty." A week later the dealer called me & gave me the update. The service rep had told me that the result after tearing the motor down was NO SOOT BUILD UP. The vehicle repairs would be covered 100% and I wouldn't have to pay a penny, some of the parts however were on national backorder so I would be waiting about a month for completion. I went in the next day after that call, and picked up a nice 2019 Grand Cherokee as a loaner, free of charge.

Now what I'm going to say is pure speculation on my part, but I may never know. I think the service rep at that dealer may have helped me out. He knew that I wasn't willing to pay the thousands of dollars for the repair, so he may have told the technician working on my truck to clean the carbon build up (if that's even possible?), to be able send photos to Chrysler to show them there is no build up, so it can be covered under warranty, thus the service department being able to claim a $6000 repair rather then just collecting the $200 from me for the labor fee.

Anyway, I just received my truck actually on 12.20.2019, just over a month of taking my truck to the 2nd dealer on 11.11.19 and over 2 months from when my truck originally broke down on 10.7.19. It's been driving with no problems these couple days, but I am looking to sell it and get away from Chrysler. I love the truck but I'm in the market for more of a family car since our first born is due in less then a month. Thank you to everyone who gave their suggestions, I really appreciate the help!
 

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UPDATE

So I denied repairs at the dealership I had originally took my vehicle too, I still had to pay the $190 diagnostic fee though. About a week after, I took my truck to another dealer in the area, this was on Nov 11. I was honest and told them the whole situation; that I had taken it to the dealership the next town over, the diagnostic they had given me, and the soot build up that the previous service department was telling me about. They took the vehicle and a few days later gave me a call.

They said they had contacted Chrysler, and basically told me that Chrysler claims carbon build up to consumer negligence and that's the way they can get out of warranty repairs. Also, the only way that the current dealership I had my vehicle at can confirm if there is any build up, is to get verbal authorization from me to go ahead and tear the motor down. They told me this is how the situation can go: Option 1- I can refuse authorization to tear down motor, I pay the $190 diagnostic fee, and take my vehicle or Option 2- I give the go ahead for the tear down, they can then either confirm or deny any soot build up. If there is build up, I can still deny repairs to fix the problem, but would have to pay a $180 labor fee for the tear down. If there is NO build up, then it would all be covered under warranty.

So I told them, "well either way I'm going to have to pay about $200 whether or not there you tear down the motor (because remember, I would either pay the diagnostic fee or the labor fee), so go ahead with the tear down, but just know that I will not be paying the $6000 repair if it is NOT covered under warranty." A week later the dealer called me & gave me the update. The service rep had told me that the result after tearing the motor down was NO SOOT BUILD UP. The vehicle repairs would be covered 100% and I wouldn't have to pay a penny, some of the parts however were on national backorder so I would be waiting about a month for completion. I went in the next day after that call, and picked up a nice 2019 Grand Cherokee as a loaner, free of charge.

Now what I'm going to say is pure speculation on my part, but I may never know. I think the service rep at that dealer may have helped me out. He knew that I wasn't willing to pay the thousands of dollars for the repair, so he may have told the technician working on my truck to clean the carbon build up (if that's even possible?), to be able send photos to Chrysler to show them there is no build up, so it can be covered under warranty, thus the service department being able to claim a $6000 repair rather then just collecting the $200 from me for the labor fee.

Anyway, I just received my truck actually on 12.20.2019, just over a month of taking my truck to the 2nd dealer on 11.11.19 and over 2 months from when my truck originally broke down on 10.7.19. It's been driving with no problems these couple days, but I am looking to sell it and get away from Chrysler. I love the truck but I'm in the market for more of a family car since our first born is due in less then a month. Thank you to everyone who gave their suggestions, I really appreciate the help!
Thanks for the update! Glad it all worked out and you got it back without a 6k repair bill. Good luck with your soon to be new baby!
 

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Another thanks for the update. Sure a bunch of bull you went through. The defective design of the EGR system sauses the soot degradation and you are responsible for that????

Hope you enjoy both the new baby and the "new baby" whatever new vehicle you get.
 
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